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Apr 27, 2020
This week’s theme
Words to describe people

This week’s words
ambivert
hapless
superbious
hoary
precocious

Previous week’s theme
Adverbs

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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

We bump into people as we go on with our lives, at work, as neighbors, in relationships, as aisle-mates on a flight, and more. Some associations are like ships passing in an ocean, lasting for a few moments, others for a lifetime.

Each person is unique, a unique combination of talents, likes, viewpoints, and more. It’s hard to sum up a whole person by a single word, but we are not limited to a single word. In this week’s A.Word.A.Day we give you five words to describe people. Does anyone come to mind who fits one or more of these attributes? Share them below or email us at words@wordsmith.org.

ambivert

PRONUNCIATION:
(AM-bi-vuhrt)

MEANING:
noun: One having the characteristics of both an extrovert and an introvert.

NOTES:
An ambivert is one who can be an extrovert or an introvert depending on the situation. For example, with family or close friends one can be open and outgoing while being reserved in the presence of strangers. Also, an ambivert can refer to someone who falls somewhere between the two extremes and shows some tendencies of each.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin ambi- (both) + -vert (as in introvert/extrovert), from vertere (to turn). Ultimately from the Indo-European root wer- (to turn or bend), which also gave us wring, weird, writhe, worth, revert, universe, animadvert, divers, quaquaversal, obverse, obvert, and verso. Earliest documented use: 1923.

USAGE:
“Being an ambivert, I speak very less or nothing at unknown people and a lot at close ones.”
Sasidhar Kareti; Unconditional Uncommitted; Notion Press; 2018.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
The being cannot be termed rational or virtuous, who obeys any authority, but that of reason. -Mary Wollstonecraft, reformer and writer (27 Apr 1759-1797)

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