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Mar 29, 2019
This week’s theme
People who became verbs

This week’s words
grandisonize
lynch
galvanize
mesmerize
crusoe

crusoe
Robinson Crusoe
Art: Offterdinger & Zweigle, c. 1880

This week’s comments
AWADmail 874

Next week’s theme
Words that turn into other words when beheaded
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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

Crusoe

PRONUNCIATION:
(KROO-soh)

MEANING:
noun: A castaway; a person who is isolated or without companionship.
verb intr.: To be marooned; to survive or manage through one’s ingenuity without outside help.

ETYMOLOGY:
After the title character of Daniel Defoe’s 1719 novel Robinson Crusoe. Crusoe was a shipwrecked sailor who spent 28 years on a remote desert island. Earliest documented use: 1888. Crusoe’s aide has also become an eponym in the English language: man Friday.

USAGE:
“Your mad heart goes Crusoeing through all the romances ...”
Arthur Rimbaud (Translation: Oliver Bernard); Collected Poems; Penguin; 1962.

“The boy Jim roams the edgelands of the Thames (just as young Stevenson liked to ‘go Crusoeing’ in the wilds of Scotland).”
Ian Thomson; The Old Buccaneers; Financial Times (London, UK); Mar 31, 2012.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Kindness is always fashionable. -Amelia Barr, novelist (29 Mar 1831-1919)

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