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May 21, 2020
This week’s theme
Which came first: the noun or the verb?

This week’s words
transect
surfeit
reconnoiter
traject
interpose

“There is no material with which human beings work which has so much potential energy as words.” ~Earnest Calkins
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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

traject

PRONUNCIATION:
(truh-JEKT)

MEANING:
verb tr.: To transport or transmit.
noun: Transport, transmission, or passage.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin traicere (to throw across), from trans- (across) + jacere (to throw). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ye- (to throw), which also gave us jet, eject, project, reject, object, subject, adjective, joist, jactitation, subjacent, and jaculate. Earliest documented use: for noun: 1552, for verb 1624.

USAGE:
“As her shot trajected toward the hoop, the whole IU bench rose to its feet.”
Dylan Wallace; From Walk-on to Scholarship; Indiana Daily Student (Bloomington, Indiana); Mar 4, 2019.

“During the whole traject I met with no living things save an enormous black eagle.”
Edmund O’Donovan; The Merv Oasis; Smith, Elder & Co.; 1882.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Be thou the first true merit to befriend, his praise is lost who stays till all commend. -Alexander Pope, poet (21 May 1688-1744)

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