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Jun 11, 2021
This week’s theme
Words from nursery rhymes

This week’s words
Humpty Dumpty
tuffet
Mother Hubbard
sukey
Simple Simon

Simple Simon
Simple Simon asking the pieman for a tasting
Illustration: E. Boyd Smith
The Boyd Smith Mother Goose, 1920

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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

Simple Simon

PRONUNCIATION:
(SIM-puhl SY-muhn)

MEANING:
noun: A simpleton.

ETYMOLOGY:
After Simple Simon, a foolish boy in a nursery rhyme. Earliest documented use: 1673.

NOTES:
The first stanza of the nursery rhyme goes:
Simple Simon met a pieman
Going to the fair;
Said Simple Simon to the pieman,
“Let me taste your ware.”
In the rest of the poem, he fishes for a whale in a bucket, tries to roast a snowball, looks for plums on a thistle plant, and has other adventures.

USAGE:
“The bespectacled, plump, Roshu came across as earnest and tentative, a Simple Simon.”
Shefalee Vasudev; The Powder Room; Random House; 2012.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
When it comes to having a central nervous system, and the ability to feel pain, hunger, and thirst, a rat is a pig is a dog is a boy. -Ingrid Newkirk, animal rights activist (b. 11 Jun 1949)

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