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Dec 17, 2019
This week’s theme
Adverb? Not!

This week’s words
homily
raguly
empanoply
logodaedaly
eutrapely

raguly
Image: Madboy74/Wikimedia

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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

raguly

PRONUNCIATION:
(RAG-yuh-lee)

MEANING:
adjective: Having a row of oblique notches.

ETYMOLOGY:
Probably from Old English ragg. Earliest documented use: 1660.

NOTES:
Why would someone need a word for having a row of oblique notches? Like a row of sawn-off branches or a row of teeth with gaps? If you are into heraldry, you might want to have an edge like that in your coat of arms. As you proudly show visitors your logo and describe its features, remember that the word raguly is used postpositively as shown in the usage example below. If raguly is not your thing, here are other edges for you to consider.

Want to take part in a fun exercise? What would your family’s coat of arms look like? Share it with us at words@wordsmith.org. Hand-drawn images are fine. Take a picture and tell us the features of your coat of arms and why you chose them.

USAGE:
“Two of the front windows as appears by the two crosses raguly, represent me and my son.”
William Lawrence; The Pyramid and the Urn; Iona Sinclair; 1994.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Contentment is, after all, simply refined indolence. -Thomas Chandler Haliburton, author, judge, and politician (17 Dec 1796-1865)

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