Wordsmith.org: the magic of words


A.Word.A.Day

About | Media | Search | Contact  


Home

Today's Word

Subscribe

Archives



May 7, 2019
This week’s theme
Words from singer-songwriter Roy Zimmerman’s songs

This week’s words
legionnaire
moribund
carny
nanny state
inveigle

On your calendar
Get A.Word.A.Day on your calendar

Bookmark and Share Facebook Twitter Digg MySpace Bookmark and Share
A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

moribund

PRONUNCIATION:
(MOR-uh-buhnd)

MEANING:
adjective:
1. Nearing death.
2. Stagnant; lacking vigor or vitality.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin moribundus (dying), from mori (to die). Ultimately from the Indo-European root mer- (to rub away or to harm), which also gave us morse, mordant, amaranth, morbid, mortal, mortgage, nightmare, premorse, morbidezza, ambrosia, and amaranthine. Earliest documented use: 1721.

USAGE:
“But even as all things are dying, one event can steer
The moribund toward more abundant cheer.”
Roy Zimmerman; Christma-Hanu-Rama-Ka-Dona-Kwanzaa; 2006.
(lyrics; video, 2.5 min)

See more usage examples of moribund in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
When old words die out on the tongue, new melodies break forth from the heart; and where the old tracks are lost, new country is revealed with its wonders. -Rabindranath Tagore, poet, philosopher, author, songwriter, painter, educator, composer, Nobel laureate (7 May 1861-1941)

We need your help

Help us continue to spread the magic of words to readers everywhere

Donate

Subscriber Services
Awards | Stats | Links | Privacy Policy
Contribute | Advertise

© 1994-2019 Wordsmith