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May 3, 2019
This week’s theme
People who became verbs

This week’s words
haussmannize
MacGyver
pasteurize
disneyfy
macadamize

macadamize
John Loudon McAdam (detail), 1830
Artist unknown

This week’s comments
AWADmail 879

Next week’s theme
Words from singer-songwriter Roy Zimmerman’s songs
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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

macadamize

PRONUNCIATION:
(muh-KAD-uh-myz)

MEANING:
verb tr.: To construct or pave a road with small, broken stones bound with asphalt or tar.

ETYMOLOGY:
After John Loudon McAdam (1756-1836), civil engineer, who pioneered this method of building a road. Earliest documented use: 1823. McAdam also appears in the word tarmac. The word was originally a trademark, coined by combining tar + McAdam.

USAGE:
“[Mark] Twain himself was an early advocate for bicycle transport; for example, he’s quoted in an 1895 edition of Portland’s Oregonian suggesting the city macadamize its streets, purchase bicycles, and rent them out to citizens.”
Fletcher Moore Twain’s Bike Lessons; Poets & Writers (New York); Sep/Oct 2011.

See more usage examples of macadamize in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
The first method for estimating the intelligence of a ruler is to look at the men he has around him. -Niccolo Machiavelli, political philosopher and author (3 May 1469-1527)

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