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Oct 15, 2020
This week’s theme
Words about words and language

This week’s words
endonym
basilect
metonymy
homeoteleuton
heterophemy

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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

homeoteleuton

PRONUNCIATION:
(ho-mee-o-TEL-yuh-ton)

MEANING:
noun: A repetition of the same or similar endings in a sequence of words.

ETYMOLOGY:
From homeo- (similar) from Greek homoio + -teleutos, from teleute (end). Earliest documented use: 1592.

NOTES:
The word also refers to a form of scribal error where a copyist’s eye skips to a word with the same ending one or more lines below where they were.

USAGE:
“Fittingly, the poem rhymes abab, although the ‘b’ rhyme in the first stanza is more homeoteleuton than true rhyme.”
Al Benthall; Worlds of Eye and Ear in the Poems of William Harmon; The Mississippi Quarterly; Jan 2004.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
One will rarely err if extreme actions be ascribed to vanity, ordinary actions to habit, and mean actions to fear. -Friedrich Nietzsche, philosopher (15 Oct 1844-1900)

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