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Jun 27, 2011
This week's theme
Eponyms

This week's words
jeeves
thrasonical
barmecidal
man Friday
micawber

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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

Have you ever read a novel so well-written that the characters came alive? This week's words are about those fictional men and women who have walked off the pages of their books and entered the dictionary. Perhaps it's a testament to the genius of the authors that their imaginary creations are now part of the living language. Let's meet five of these words, also known as eponyms, this week.

Jeeves

PRONUNCIATION:
(jeevz)

MEANING:
noun: A personal servant, especially one who is resourceful and reliable.

ETYMOLOGY:
After Reginald Jeeves, a valet in the stories by P.G. Wodehouse. Jeeves first made his appearance in a short story in 1915. Earliest documented example of the word used allusively: 1952.

USAGE:
"When you've got a billion dollars at your disposal, and a Jeeves to take care of your travel arrangements, nothing untoward is going to happen to you."
Nicholas Barber; The Bucket List; The Independent (London, UK); Feb 17, 2008.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Writing, when properly managed, (as you may be sure I think mine is) is but a different name for conversation. -Laurence Sterne, novelist and clergyman (1713-1768)

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