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Jul 7, 2011
This week's theme
Contranyms, or words with an opposite set of meanings

This week's words
ravel
adjure
avocation
inure
adumbrate
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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

inure

PRONUNCIATION:
(in-YOOR, i-NOOR)

MEANING:
verb tr.: To accustom to something unpleasant.
verb intr.: 1. To become beneficial. 2. To take effect.

ETYMOLOGY:
From the phrase in/en ure (in use, customary), from French oeuvre (work), from Latin opera, plural of opus (work). Ultimately from the Indo-European root op- (to work, produce) that is also the ancestor of words such as opera, opulent, optimum, operose, maneuver, and manure. Earliest documented use: 1489.

NOTES:
The intransitive form of the word is usually used in legal contexts and also spelled as enure.

USAGE:
"We were never able to tell our daughter that things would get better. No amount of repetition can inure you to these things."
Aleksandar Hemon; The Aquarium; The New Yorker; Jun 13, 2011.

"'Jody Henderson voted on measures which he knew would inure to the special private gain of a business associate,' the commission stated."
Tom McLaughlin; Trustee Will Likely be Fined for Voting Conflict; The Walton Sun (Santa Rosa Beach, Florida); May 27, 2011.

See more usage examples of inure in Vocabulary.com's dictionary.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
A cult is a religion with no political power. -Tom Wolfe, author and journalist (b. 1931)

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