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Jun 29, 2018
This week’s theme
Words from politics

This week’s words
malfeasance
nepotism
emolument
collusion
impeach

impeach
This week’s comments
AWADmail 835

Next week’s theme
Verbs
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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

impeach

PRONUNCIATION:
(im-PEECH)

MEANING:
verb tr.:
1. To charge a public official with misconduct in office.
2. To challenge the credibility of someone.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Anglo-Norman empecher (to ensnare), from Latin impedicare (to catch or entangle), from pedica (fetter), from pes/ped (foot). Earliest documented use: 1380.

NOTES:
When someone is impeached, he has his foot caught in the law, literally speaking. From being on a pedestal (literally, foot of a stall) to getting impeached can be a short journey, but sometimes it takes a long time. Let the law do its job! Patience is rewarded.

USAGE:
“That’s why Nixon would have been impeached, convicted, and then thrown out of the office, if he hadn’t cut a deal to save his neck.”
Kerry Bryant; A House Once Stolen; BookBaby; 2015.

“And you had no witness or evidence to impeach this boy’s statement, did you?”
James Patterson; 14th Deadly Sin; Little, Brown and Co.; 2015.

See more usage examples of impeach in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Transport of the mails, transport of the human voice, transport of flickering pictures -- in this century, as in others, our highest accomplishments still have the single aim of bringing men together. -Antoine de Saint-Exupery, author and aviator (29 Jun 1900-1944)

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