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Oct 31, 2014
This week's theme
Rhetorical devices

This week's words
antimetabole
zeugma
synecdoche
epanalepsis
hendiadys

This week's comments
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Next week's theme
Well-traveled words
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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

hendiadys

PRONUNCIATION:
(hen-DY-uh-dis)

MEANING:
noun: A figure of speech in which two words joined by a conjunction are used to convey a single idea instead of using a word and its modifier.
Example: "pleasant and warm" instead of "pleasantly warm"

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin hendiadys, from Greek hen dia duoin (one by two). Earliest documented use: 1589.

USAGE:
"'One good student and nice is Julio.'
'I compliment you on the superb hendiadys re: Julio.'"
John Fredrick; The King of Good Intentions; Verse Chorus Press; 2013.

See more usage examples of hendiadys in Vocabulary.com's dictionary.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
There is a budding morrow in midnight. -John Keats, poet (1795-1821)

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