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May 20, 2014
This week's theme
Words coined after Shakespearean characters

This week's words
ophelian
benedict
hamlet
bardolphian
polonian

Benedict
David Garrick as Benedick
Art: Jean Louis Fesch, 1770

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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

benedict

PRONUNCIATION:
(BEN-i-dikt)

MEANING:
noun: A newly married man, especially one who was previously thought to be a confirmed bachelor.

ETYMOLOGY:
From alteration of Benedick, character in Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing. Earliest documented use: 1821.

USAGE:
"Columbus Moise, the old bachelor lawyer, who is soon to be a benedict, answered the toast."
Miguel Antonio Otero; My Life on the Frontier, 1882-1897; 1935.

See more usage examples of benedict in Vocabulary.com's dictionary.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
A person may cause evil to others not only by his actions but by his inaction, and in either case he is justly accountable to them for the injury. -John Stuart Mill, philosopher and economist (1806-1873)

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