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Re: Redundantly tautological pleonastic names #29649
10/12/01 11:09 AM
10/12/01 11:09 AM
Joined: Nov 2000
Posts: 866
Perth, Western Australia
stales Offline
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stales  Offline
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Perth, Western Australia
Before I proceed, you need to know that Ozilder's pronounce "Scarborough" as "Scar-bru" (u as in lust)

Anyway, there's a lady geologist called Barbara that used to (may still do) live in Perth. I forget her maiden name but no matter - she married Mr Scarborough.

As if Barbara Scarborough wasn't bad enough, she was known far and wide as Babs Scabs.

Her maiden name must have been bloody awful to want to run with Scarborough!

stales


Re: pronuuciation #29650
10/12/01 11:40 AM
10/12/01 11:40 AM
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Keiva Offline
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My understanding is the name Beryl is ponounced like the semi-precious stone of that name; rhymes Cheryl or sterile. Not a perfect match for "barrel", but closer if "barrel" is being used as a minor, unstressed word in a sentence. Closeness depends in part on the speaker's accent: a brit, for example, would pronouce more broadly the a in "barrel".

There is also the name Barrell (masc., yiddish), never common, but I've never heard of anyone having that name younger than may grandparents' generation.


Re: pronuuciation #29651
10/12/01 01:19 PM
10/12/01 01:19 PM
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Posts: 3,065
Jakarta
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Jakarta
In reply to:

the name Beryl is ponounced like the semi-precious stone of that name; rhymes Cheryl or sterile


With Cheryl maybe, certainly not with sterile.

Bingley



Bingley
Re: pronuuciation #29652
10/12/01 01:43 PM
10/12/01 01:43 PM
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 25
Cheshire, UK
Y
Yoda Offline
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Yoda  Offline
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Cheshire, UK
With Cheryl maybe, certainly not with sterile

Absolutely, old chap . Nor with futile or butyl.


Re: Redundantly tautological pleonastic names #29653
10/12/01 02:03 PM
10/12/01 02:03 PM
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Posts: 11,613
Louisville, Kentucky
Jackie Offline
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Louisville, Kentucky
The difference between beryl and barrel is exactly the same.
Okay, this I don't understand, at all. Unless you pronounce barrel with the same a-sound that's in bar?
I pronounce barrel with the same a-sound that's in bare.
Beryl looks as though it ought to have the same vowel sound as berry. Just like in bare, or air.
And, sterile is STAIR-ill. Or, maybe, STAIR-ull is closer.





Re: Redundantly tautological pleonastic names #29654
10/12/01 02:31 PM
10/12/01 02:31 PM
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Jakarta
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Bingley Offline
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Jakarta
Oh ye gods. I wish this board had sound capacity.

The first syllable of sterile and Beryl has the same vowel as in men or Ben. The ile part of sterile is pronounced the same as in isle/aisle. The yl part of Beryl is pronounced ull.

Bingley


Bingley
Re: regional? #29655
10/12/01 03:25 PM
10/12/01 03:25 PM
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Keiva Offline
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Interesting.
As to Beryl, my region agrees with Jackie and Bingley, with the distincion that the second syllable, unstressed, is probably the schma sound.

As to sterile, Bingley's version would sound completely odd and off here. Could this be the standard "atlantic divide" (geographically teleported, in Bingley's case )? Jackie's version ("stair") would pass here, but would sold faintly foreign. In that I'm assuming, an may well be mistaken, that Jackie would pronounce "stair" the same as a Chicagoan would.

Faldage's usual "bartleby" site give the first syllable of "sterile" per my version (and beryl the same), but the second syllable per Bingley's. Was the word ever spoken in the movie The Sterile Cookoo?


Re: Redundantly tautological pleonastic names #29656
10/12/01 03:46 PM
10/12/01 03:46 PM
Joined: Mar 2000
Posts: 11,613
Louisville, Kentucky
Jackie Offline
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Louisville, Kentucky
The first syllable of sterile and Beryl has the same vowel as in men or Ben.
Yes, I just said that: the e sound in men and Ben is the same as the a-sound in bare or air: BEH-rull, = barrel.
I breathe ehr. I climb the stehr.

The ile part of sterile is pronounced the same as in isle/aisle.
Nope. Ill or ull.




Re: Redundantly tautological pleonastic names #29657
10/12/01 07:40 PM
10/12/01 07:40 PM
Joined: Jul 2000
Posts: 3,467
Marion NC
TEd Remington Offline
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Here's a few that came to me in my sleep last night:

Pat Small
Peter Dwindle
Mike Measure
Pat Cosset
John Throne
John Loo
Carl Peasant
Marsh Moore
Earl Peer
Earl Noble
Marshal Sheriff
Marshal Constable
Marshal Reeve
Carrie Young (not pleonastic but funny to me!)
Van Wayne
Carrie Trust
Ted Scatter
Carol Singer
Chuck Roast
Karen Custody
Margaret Pearl
Wayne Wright
Carrie Winn
Job Post
Barry Intern
Bob Barber
Bill Dunn
Mark Brand
Art Talent
John Customer
Tom Drake
Sue Woo

Perhaps when I'm wide awake I'll think of a few more.

And here's one for the Englishers:

Tom Gibb



TEd
Re: Redundantly tautological pleonastic names #29658
10/13/01 03:04 AM
10/13/01 03:04 AM
Joined: Jul 2000
Posts: 1,094
Cincinnati & Loveland, Ohio, U...
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Jazzoctopus Offline
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Cincinnati & Loveland, Ohio, U...
Yes, I just said that: the e sound in men and Ben is the same as the a-sound in bare or air: BEH-rull, = barrel.

Hold on a sec. This is only a Southern occurance. Y'all down there pronounce the e in men and Ben like a long a with a little more toward the i sound. That makes men and man sound very similar. And that's why Kentucky sounds like Caintuck. I would say that for the rest of us in the US, Ben and bare sound quite different.


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