Wordsmith.org: the magic of words

Wordsmith Talk

About Us | What's New | Search | Site Map | Contact Us  

Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Page 20 of 26 1 2 18 19 20 21 22 25 26
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 9,903
W
Carpal Tunnel
OP Offline
Carpal Tunnel
W
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 9,903

BEZOAR

PRONUNCIATION: (BEE-zohr)

MEANING: noun: A stone-like mass formed in the stomach or intestines of some animals, formerly believed to be a remedy for poison.

ETYMOLOGY: From Old French bezahar/bezoard, from Arabic bazahr, from Persian padzahr (antidote), from pad- (protector) + zahr (poison). Earliest documented use: 1597.
__________________________

BE SOAR - how you'll feel the day after your first workout in months

BEFOAR - in front of, ahead of

BED OAR - what you row your cot down the stream with

Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 9,903
W
Carpal Tunnel
OP Offline
Carpal Tunnel
W
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 9,903

CAVALCADE

PRONUNCIATION: (kav-uhl-KAYD, KAV-uhl-kayd)

MEANING: noun:
1. A procession of riders on horses, vehicles, etc.
2. A noteworthy series of events.

ETYMOLOGY: From French cavalcade (stampede, cavalcade), from Italian cavalcata (ride, cavalcade), from cavalcare (to ride on horseback), from Latin caballus (horse). Earliest documented use: 1591.
________________________________

CAVALCARE - veterinary insurance for horses

NAVALCADE - the Seventh Fleet traverses the Panama Canal

CABALCADE - a procession of conspiratorial numerologists

Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 9,903
W
Carpal Tunnel
OP Offline
Carpal Tunnel
W
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 9,903

SABER-RATTLING or SABRE-RATTLING

PRONUNCIATION: (SAY-buhr-rat-ling)

MEANING: noun: Threatening words or action, for example, in the form of a flamboyant display of military power.

ETYMOLOGY: From saber/sabre (a heavy cavalry sword with a curved blade), from French sabre, from German dialect Sabel (now Säbel), from Hungarian szablya + rattle (to make a quick succession of sharp noises), probably ultimately of imitative origin. Earliest documented use: 1922.
_______________________________

SABER-TATTLING - Your sword...it's unbated and envenomed! I'm gonna tell on you!

SABRE-GATTLING - six whirling blades to cut down your opponents en masse

SAVER RATTLING - how falling interest rates affect consumers with just a little left over at the end of the month

S.A. BERRA TILING - Yogi's Mexican relatives' mosaic-making company

Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 9,903
W
Carpal Tunnel
OP Offline
Carpal Tunnel
W
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 9,903

CALASH

PRONUNCIATION: (kuh-LASH)

MEANING: noun:
1. A light horse-drawn carriage with a folding top.
2. The folding top of a carriage.
3. A folding bonnet formerly worn by women.

ETYMOLOGY: From French calèche, from German Kalesche, from Czech kolésa (carriage, wheels). Earliest documented use: 1666.
_____________________________________________

ALASH - mumbled by a tipsy Shakespearean actor, addressing the skull of poor Yorick

CA-WASH - where a Bostonian takes his vehicle to remove the dirt and road salt from last winter

CAL'BASH - she to whom you say "Goodnight" at the end of the show, no matter where she is

CALAS - late, lamented soprano star

Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 9,903
W
Carpal Tunnel
OP Offline
Carpal Tunnel
W
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 9,903

INTERDIGITATE

PRONUNCIATION: (in-tuhr-DIJ-i-tayt)

MEANING: verb tr., intr.: To interlock like the fingers of two hands.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin inter- (between, together) + digitus (finger, toe). Ultimately from the Indo-European root deik- (to show, to pronounce solemnly), which also gave us judge, verdict, vendetta, revenge, indicate, dictate, paradigm, diktat, dictatress, dittohead, fatidic, hoosegow, and interdict. Earliest documented use: 1847.

NOTES: To interdigitate is to hold hands together. Also, to hold toes of two feet together. Also, hand and foot. Also, hand and paw. Or foot and paw. Think of other combinations. Show us what you come up with. Write to us at words@wordsmith.org.
____________________________

WINTERDIGITATE - freeze one's fingers; needs mittens

INTER, DIG, IRATE - angry gravedigger describes his day tersely

ENTER DIGIT AT "E" - write in a numeral on the fifth line

Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 9,903
W
Carpal Tunnel
OP Offline
Carpal Tunnel
W
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 9,903

TITULAR

PRONUNCIATION: (TICH-luhr, TIT-uh-luhr)

MEANING: adjective:
1. Of or relating to a title.
2. In the name only: having a title without accompanying responsibilities and powers.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin titulus (title). Earliest documented use: 1540.
_______________________________

TITH LAR - a Klingon Rite of Passage

TIBULAR - involving both bones of the lower leg

TITULAX - brand name of a remedy for heartburn and constipation; contains calcium carbonate and phenolphthalien

TITULAE - teeny weeny titles


Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 9,903
W
Carpal Tunnel
OP Offline
Carpal Tunnel
W
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 9,903

COCKLOFT

PRONUNCIATION: (KOK-loft)

MEANING: noun: A small loft just below the roof.

ETYMOLOGY: From cock (rooster), from Old English cocc, of imitative origin + Old English loft (sky). Apparently roosters love to roost up high and this is the highest place, indoors, in the house. Earliest documented use: 1580.
_________________________________

BOCKLOFT - the high you get from some beers

CORKLOFT - storage for bottle stoppers; a good use for that "wasted space" just below the roof peak in an old winery

COCKLIFT - rooster thumbs a ride

Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 9,903
W
Carpal Tunnel
OP Offline
Carpal Tunnel
W
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 9,903

CUNTLINE (or CONTLINE or CANTLINE)

PRONUNCIATION: (KUHNT-lyn)

MEANING: noun:
1. The spiraling groove between two strands of a rope.
2. The space between bilges (the widest part) of two casks stowed side by side.

ETYMOLOGY: From cant (slope), from French from Latin cantus (corner), from canthus (rim). Earliest documented use: 1848.
_____________________________

AUNTLINE - inheritance via your mother's sister

COUNTLINE - sheep passing under the Shepherd's staff

CULT LINE - "Join us! Salvation awaits!"

Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 9,903
W
Carpal Tunnel
OP Offline
Carpal Tunnel
W
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 9,903

CUMMINGTONITE

PRONUNCIATION: (KUHM-ing-tuh-nyt)

MEANING: noun: A mineral, otherwise known as magnesium iron silicate hydroxide.

ETYMOLOGY: Named after Cummington, Massachusetts, where it was discovered. Earliest documented use: 1824.

NOTES: Cummingtonite is named after Cummington, MA, and the town of Cummington itself is named after Colonel John Cumings who got things started in the township. If cummingtonite is not enough for you, there’s also fukalite, named after Fuka mines in the Fuka region of Japan. Then there is carnalite, named after mining engineer Rudolf von Carnall.

Not much is known about cummingtonite’s applications. An unscientific survey shows it’s commonly used in the making of T-shirts [as a leering nerdy pun - Wofa].
_____________________________________

CUMMIN TONITE - smells like curry for dinner!

CHUMMING TONITE - that'll be good bait for fishing tomorrow

CUMM INTO NITE - newly-discovered Eugene O'Neill play

CUMMING TO NICE - Riviera, next stop!

Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 9,903
W
Carpal Tunnel
OP Offline
Carpal Tunnel
W
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 9,903

FAFF

PRONUNCIATION: (faf)

MEANING:\. verb intr.: To waste time without accomplishing much.
noun: Fuss; activity perceived as a waste of time.

ETYMOLOGY: Of imitative origin, to describe something flapping in the wind. Earliest documented use: 1874.
____________________________

FAPF - all you can utter when you're stupefied beyond speaking [homage to Major Hoople]

FA𝒇𝒇 - the fourth note of the scale, played very loudly

F.A.C.F. - Fellow of the American College of Fellows

Page 20 of 26 1 2 18 19 20 21 22 25 26

Moderated by  Jackie 

Link Copied to Clipboard
Forum Statistics
Forums16
Topics13,907
Posts228,374
Members9,161
Most Online3,341
Dec 9th, 2011
Newest Members
Silverfox, Red_Canoe, Merchant7, crusoe66, TheFilthyOre
9,161 Registered Users
Who's Online Now
0 members (), 81 guests, and 3 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Top Posters(30 Days)
Top Posters
wwh 13,858
Faldage 13,803
Jackie 11,613
tsuwm 10,542
LukeJavan8 9,854
AnnaStrophic 6,511
Wordwind 6,296
of troy 5,400
Disclaimer: Wordsmith.org is not responsible for views expressed on this site. Use of this forum is at your own risk and liability - you agree to hold Wordsmith.org and its associates harmless as a condition of using it.

Home | Today's Word | Yesterday's Word | Subscribe | FAQ | Archives | Search | Feedback
Wordsmith Talk | Wordsmith Chat

© 1994-2022 Wordsmith

Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5