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SHERO

PRONUNCIATION: (SHEE-roh)

MEANING: noun: A woman admired for her courage, achievements, or noble qualities.

ETYMOLOGY: A blend of she + hero, from Latin heros (a demigod or man with heroic qualities; [plural: heroes]), from Greek heros. Ultimately from the Indo-European root ser- (to protect), which also gave us conserve, observe, preserve, and reserve. Earliest documented use: 1836.
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SHEERO - brand name of particularly suggestive women's nightwear

SH ERGO - here's my reasoning, but don't tell anybody

SHERLO - Mrs. Holmes' affectionate name for the detective

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PRISSY

Pronunciation; (PRI-see)

MEANING: adjective: Overly prim and preciseso as to appear prudish or finicky.

ETYMOLOGY: Perhaps a blend of prim + sissy. Earliest documented use: 1894
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PLISSY - opponent of Firguson in court

PRIMSY - a whimsical flower, combination of Mimsy and Primrose

PRISMY - scattering light into rainbows

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AMUSE-GUEULE

PRONUNCIATION: (uh-mooz-GUHL)

MEANING: noun: A small item of food served as an appetizer.

ETYMOLOGY: From French amuse-gueule (literally, amuses the mouth), from amuser (to amuse) + gueule (mouth). A synonym, another tosspot word from French, is amuse-bouche. Earliest documented use: 1963.
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MUSE-GUEULE - that would be Erato, in charge of Sacred Poetry

ABUSE-GUEULE - a tongue-lashing

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SKITTERBROOK

PRONUNCIATION: (SKIT-uhr-brook)

MEANING: noun: A coward.

ETYMOLOGY: From Dutch schijtebroek (literally, shits his pants), from schijten (to shit) + broek (pants). Earliest documented use: 1652.
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SKITTERBROOM - used to sweep the ice in curling, so the stones will go where you want them to

SKITTERBOOK - Where can I find information about skittering?

SKITTERBORO OK? - Should we go to Titusville or Skitterboro?

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CACHE-SEXE

PRONUNCIATION: (KASH-seks)

MEANING: noun: A small garment to cover the genitals.

ETYMOLOGY: From French cache-sexe (literally, hides sex), from cacher (to hide) + sexe (genitals, sex). Earliest documented use: 1926.
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CACHE-SEE - a children's game (also called hide-and-go-seek)

CACHET-SEXE - a VERY high-class call girl (see also CASHE-SEXE)

ACHE-SEXE - hung-up; stimulated but not released

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SCALDOBANCO

PRONUNCIATION: (skal-duh-BAHNG-koh)

MEANING: noun: A fiery speaker, especially a preacher.

ETYMOLOGY: From obsolete Italian scaldabanco (literally, heats the bench), from scaldare (to heat) + banco (bench). Earliest documented use: 1670.
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SCOLDOBANCO - where you sit in the office of the Assistant Principal in charge of Discipline

SCALDOBIANCO - heated white-hot

SCALDOBARCO - pour boiling water over the trunk of a tree (or boat)

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GAINPAIN

PRONUNCIATION: (GAYN-payn)

MEANING: noun:
1. A long thick glove: gauntlet.
2. A hired soldier: mercenary.

ETYMOLOGY: From Old French gaignepain (literally, wins the bread), from gagner (to win or earn) + pain (bread). Earliest documented use: 1430.
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GAINSPAIN - conquer Iberia

GAINPAIR - adopt twins

GAISPAIN - joli, in France

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SABOTAGE

PRONUNCIATION: (SAB-uh-tazh)

MEANING: verb tr.: To disrupt, damage, or destroy, especially in an underhanded manner.
noun: An instance of such subversion.

ETYMOLOGY: From French saboter (to walk noisily, to botch), from sabot (wooden shoe). Earliest documented use: 1910.

NOTES: The popular story of disgruntled workers throwing their sabots into the machinery to jam it is not supported by evidence. Rather, it’s that the workers typically wore sabots.
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SABOTANGE - an angel in wooden shoes

SAABOTAGE - short-circuiting the assembly line while working under cover for General Motors

JABOTAGE - frilly lace bibs for women's blouses

SABOTAGUE - Louis XVI's feet hurt parce que his shoes were too tight

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ROUGHSHOD

PRONUNCIATION: (RUF-shod)

MEANING:\ . adjective: 1. Domineering; bullying; brutal.
2. Having horseshoes with projecting nails or calks to prevent slipping.
adverb: In a domineering or harsh manner.

ETYMOLOGY: From rough + shod (wearing shoes), past participle of shoe. Earliest documented use: 1688.
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ROUGHS HOP - a prom for thugs

ROUGHS OD - I don't care how macho you are, overdosing is no picnic

ROUGH SHOP - where you buy rasps and files and sandpaper

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OLD SHOE

PRONUNCIATION: (old shoo)

MEANING: noun: Something or someone comfortably familiar, especially in an unpretentious manner.

ETYMOLOGY: Alluding to the familiar comfort of an old pair of shoes. Earliest documented use: 1386.

NOTES: The idiom “old shoe” has traveled around the block in the English language a few times. In the beginning it meant something worthless. Then there was this superstition of throwing shoes after a person leaving on a trip. This developed into the idiom old shoe meaning good luck. Finally, there’s something to be said about the comfort of stepping into an old pair of shoes (compared to breaking in a new pair) that resulted in the current meaning of the term
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OLD SHMOE - an elderly bumbler

OLD SHOW - The $64,000 Question, say

OLDISH O.E. - I found a copy of the Oxford English Dictionary from the 1950s!

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