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BORA CHIC - high style on Tahiti [Re: wofahulicodoc] #228605
09/06/18 10:21 PM
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BORACIC

PRONUNCIATION: (buh-RAS-ik, bo-)
Also brassic (BRA-sik)

MEANING: adjective: Poor or broke.

ETYMOLOGY: Rhyming slang, boracic lint ⇨ skint. Boracic lint was a type of medical dressing dipped in a solution of boracic/boric acid. See more at skint. Earliest documented use: 1959.
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BORACID - a brand of boric acid (H3BO3)

BORN CIC - ...and some achieve Commander-in-Chief, and some...

BOREACIC - pertaining to the Southern Hemisphere

SCORBY - deficient in Vitamin C [Re: wofahulicodoc] #228613
09/07/18 07:48 PM
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SCOOBY

PRONUNCIATION: (SKOO-bee)

MEANING: noun: Clue.

ETYMOLOGY: Rhyming slang, Scooby-Doo ⇨ clue. Scooby-Doo is a dog in television series and films. Earliest documented use: 1993.
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SCOMBY - sick from eating spoiled fish

SCOO'BOY - what the 2-year-old male Montessori student called himself

'SCOOBA - Havana is the capital of what big Caribbean island 100-odd miles south of Florida?

Last edited by wofahulicodoc; 09/07/18 07:49 PM.
three zany definitions [Re: wofahulicodoc] #228626
09/11/18 01:17 AM
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ZANY

PRONUNCIATION: (ZAY-nee)

MEANING: adjective: Amusingly strange, comical, or clownish.

ETYMOLOGY: From French zani, from Italian zanni, a nickname for Giovanni. The term has its origin in the comedy theater commedia dell’arte popular in 16-18th century Italy. Giovanni, Italian form of the name John, was originally the generic name of the servant, a stock character who tried to mimic his master, himself a clown. Earliest documented use: 1596.
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ZZNY - and you thought the city never sleeps ...so there!

CZANY - Austrian composer of School of Velocity and hundreds of other piano practice pieces, as he was known in Boston

NANY - a funeral song, as in a choral work by Brahms and a poem by Schiller

he's the "Punch" in Punch and Judy [Re: wofahulicodoc] #228629
09/12/18 12:15 AM
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PUNCHINELLO

PRONUNCIATION: (pun-chuh-NEL-o)

MEANING: noun: A grotesque or absurd person.

ETYMOLOGY: From Italian (Naples dialect) polecenella (a short, fat buffoon, principal character in Italian puppet shows), diminutive of pollecena (turkey pullet), ultimately from Latin pullus (young chicken). From the resemblance of punchinello’s nose to a turkey’s beak. Earliest documented use: 1662.
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MUNCHINELLO a fat buffoon who eats all the time (see also PAUNCHINELLO}

PUNCHINJELLO - a gelatin dessert made with fruit punch (caution: if you try to spike it, the alcohol will prevent it from gelling)

PUNCHING 'ELLO - the practice of greeting friends with a knuckle to the upper arm

PUNCHLINE: LLO - (you make up this one)

AMAFON - where to call Organized Medicine [Re: wofahulicodoc] #228630
09/13/18 03:26 AM
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ALAZON

PRONUNCIATION: (AL-uh-zon)

MEANING: noun: A person characterized by arrogance, braggadocio, lack of self awareness, etc.

ETYMOLOGY: After Alazon, a stock character in ancient Greek comedy. Earliest documented use: 1911.
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ALAMON - a square dance maneuver, akin to the Grand Right and Left

ALE-ZON - a new beer hall in Munich

ALARON - a trim tab on the tail of an airplane (usually one of a pair)

EIRO - American architect Saarinen, to his friends [Re: wofahulicodoc] #228632
09/14/18 02:26 AM
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EIRON

PRONUNCIATION: (AY-ron)

MEANING: noun: A person characterized by self-deprecation and awareness of irony.

ETYMOLOGY: After Eiron, a stock character in ancient Greek comedy. It’s from Greek eiron (dissembler), which also gave us the word irony. Eiron is the opposite of Alazon. He uses self-deprecation and feigned ignorance to triumph over Alazon. Earliest documented use: 1872.
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E-ICON - small image on a desktop or hand-held electronic device representing a program or file

ERRON - the subatomic particle from which all sins ultimately arise

ELIRON - a trim tab on the tail of an airplane (usually one of a pair) - see also ALARON, above

CAFITANO - Starbucks' latest, a bold Italian roast [Re: wofahulicodoc] #228633
09/14/18 04:38 PM
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CAPITANO

PRONUNCIATION: (kap-uh-TAH-no)

MEANING: noun: A swaggering, cowardly person, especially a soldier, policeman, etc.

ETYMOLOGY: After Capitano, a stock character in commedia dell’arte, from Italian capitano (captain), from Latin caput (head). Earliest documented use: 1594.
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CARPITANO - a painful syndrome that is frequently the result of repetitive strain injury to the wrist

CAPRITANO - skin pigmentation due to sunbathing on an island off Italy (unless you spend too much time in the Blue Grotto)

CAPITALO - an upper-case letter frequently confused with a zero

COLUMBONE - connected to the roofbone [Re: wofahulicodoc] #228642
09/18/18 02:06 AM
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COLUMBINE

PRONUNCIATION: (KOL-uhm-byn)

MEANING: noun: 1. A servant girl.
2. A saucy sweetheart.
3. Any of various plants of the genus Aquilegia.
adjective: Of or relating to a dove, in innocence, gentleness, color, etc.

ETYMOLOGY: For noun 1, 2: After Colombina, a stock character in commedia dell’arte, the mistress of Harlequin. From Italian colombina (small dove, a guileless woman). Earliest documented use: 1723.
For noun 3: From the resemblance of an inverted flower to five doves. Earliest documented use: 1325.
For adjective: From Latin columba (dove, pigeon). Earliest documented use: 1656.
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COLUMNINE - comes just before the tenth vertical row (see also COLUMEINE, the first vertical row in Berlin)

COLUMBIANE - a woman from Bogotá

COLUMBRINE - what you use to make pickled colums


RAD ILE - where weird Parisiens live in the Seine [Re: wofahulicodoc] #228643
09/18/18 06:47 PM
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RADDLE

PRONUNCIATION: (RAD-l)

MEANING: noun: Red ocher, used for marking animals, coloring, etc.
verb tr.: 1. To mark or paint with red ocher.
2. To twist together or interweave.
3. To beat or to cause to have a worn-out appearance.

ETYMOLOGY: noun & verb 1: A variant of ruddle, from rud (red). Ultimately from the Indo-European root reudh- (red), which also gave us red, rouge, ruby, ruddy, rubella, corroborate, robust, rambunctious, roborant, russet, and robustious. Earliest documented use: 1325.
verb 2: From English dialect raddle (stick interwoven with others in a fence). Ultimately from the Indo-European root reidh- (to ride), which also gave us ride, raid, road, ready, and raiment. Earliest documented use: 1470.
verb 3: Origin unknown. Earliest documented use: 1677.
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REDDLE - a red dye popular in the early 19th century. See Diggory Venn, the Reddleman, in Thomas Hardy's Return of the Native

FADDLE - something that enjoys a massive but short-lived popularity

RA:DDE - Eisenhower's very junior position at Columbia before he became President

MIZZLE - a mixture of mist and drizzle [Re: wofahulicodoc] #228645
09/19/18 12:49 PM
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MIZZLE

PRONUNCIATION:
(MIZ-uhl)

MEANING: noun: Fine rain or drizzle.
verb intr.: 1. To rain in fine drops.
2. To leave suddenly.
3. To confuse.

ETYMOLOGY: noun, verb 1: From Middle English misellen (to drizzle). Ultimately from the Indo-European root meigh- (to urinate), which also gave us mist, thrush, mistletoe, and micturate. Earliest documented use: 1439.
verb 2: Of unknown origin. Earliest documented use: 1772.
verb 3: Of unknown origin. Earliest documented use: 1583.
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MIZZLES - a viral infection with skin rash and fever, usually just a nuisance in childhood but potentially serious in adults

MOZZLE - fortune, often with "tov" ("good")

MIZZ-LEZ - what a lazy markzman tries to do

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