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living in infamy [Re: wofahulicodoc] #227649
11/21/17 03:23 PM
11/21/17 03:23 PM
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NOTORIOUS

PRONUNCIATION: (no-TOR-ee-uhs)

MEANING: adjective: Known widely and unfavorably.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin notorius (well-known), from notus (known). Earliest documented use: 1495.
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OTORIOUS - ear-filling; noisy

MOTORIOUS - Detroit-based

NOMORIOUS - foreswearing gambling (or at least losing)

Re: living in infamy [Re: wofahulicodoc] #227656
11/23/17 02:11 AM
11/23/17 02:11 AM
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VIDETTE

PRONUNCIATION: (vuh-DET, vi-)

MEANING: noun:
1. A leading stage or film star.
2. A mounted sentry or a scouting boat posted in an advanced position to observe the movements of an enemy.

ETYMOLOGY: From French vedette (star, as in a film star; speedboat), from Italian vedetta (influenced by vedere: to see), from veletta. Ultimately from the Indo-European root weg- (to be strong or lively), which also gave us vigor, velocity, vegetable, vegete, and velitation. Earliest documented use: sense 1: 1963, sense 2: 1690.
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VIDESTE - Caesar's "Look to the East!"

VIXETTE - a small female fox cub

VIDEO TE - take a moving-picture selfie

CERATE - waxy [Re: wofahulicodoc] #227662
11/23/17 04:23 PM
11/23/17 04:23 PM
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ACERATE

PRONUNCIATION: (AS-uh-rayt)

MEANING: adjective: Needlelike.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin acerosus (full of chaff), erroneously interpreted as derived from acus (needle) or acer (sharp), ultimately from the Indo-European root ak- (sharp), which is also the source of acrid, vinegar, acid, acute, edge, hammer, heaven, eager, oxygen, mediocre, acerbate, acidic, acidulous, acuity, and paragon. Earliest documented use: 1833.
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APERATE - to create an opening or window in

NACERATE - encase in order to streamline

ACERITE - a native of Acer

ACE RAT - Frank Sinatra

7-8-9 [Re: wofahulicodoc] #227663
11/23/17 08:12 PM
11/23/17 08:12 PM
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Racerate- Racer X's teammate

E G REGIONS - areas, for example [Re: may2point0] #227668
11/24/17 08:45 PM
11/24/17 08:45 PM
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EGREGIOUS

PRONUNCIATION:
(i-GREE-juhs, -jee-uhs)

MEANING:
adjective: Remarkable in a bad way; flagrant.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin egregius (outstanding), from ex- (out of) + greg-, stem of grex (flock). Earlier something egregious was one that stood out because it was remarkably good. Over the centuries the word took a 180-degree turn and today it refers to something grossly offensive. Earliest documented use: 1550.
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EGRET IOUs - I beat those birds fair and square, and they didn't have enough cash to pay up...

PEGREGIOUS - really committed to playing Cribbage

EGG-REGIOUS - got a bit carried away with that omelet, didn't you?

and Heffalumps [Re: wofahulicodoc] #227682
11/28/17 01:13 AM
11/28/17 01:13 AM
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FAIENCE

PRONUNCIATION: (fay-AHNS, fy-)

MEANING: noun: Glazed earthenware, especially decorated tin-glazed pottery.

ETYMOLOGY: From French faïence (earthenware), from Faïence, the French name for Faenza, a city in northern Italy known for its glazed earthenware industry. Earliest documented use: 1714.
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FAIERCE - how an Irishman describes lions and tigers and other animals with fangs and sharp claws

SAIENCE - a session with a Medium who lets you communicate with the spirits of the Departed

FADIENCE - how long the bright colors of fireworks will persist (the opposite of "radiance")

It's a thang, y'all [Re: wofahulicodoc] #227685
11/28/17 04:17 AM
11/28/17 04:17 AM
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Ofaience- Southern scorn and vexation

Faiencèé - capricious imagination

Last edited by may2point0; 11/28/17 04:18 AM.
MACONIC - like a city in Feorgia [Re: may2point0] #227686
11/28/17 04:14 PM
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LACONIC

PRONUNCIATION: (luh-KON-ik)

MEANING: adjective: Sparing with words: concise or terse.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin Laconicus, from Greek Lakonikos, from Lakon, Laconian, a resident of Laconia, an ancient country in southern Greece (capital: Sparta). From the reputation of the Laconians for terseness. Earliest documented use: 1601.

NOTES: Two other toponyms are coined after the names of towns in Laconia: helot and spartan, which is coined after Sparta, the capital of Laconia.
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LACONIC = like a city in New Hampshire (or Washington,, or Tennessee, or Indiana, or...)
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L.A.CON, INC - organizes conventions in Los Angeles

ACONIC - a volcano that has blown its top

LACORNIC - typical of the humor delivered by an LACOMIC (you think it's easy getting a laugh out of a bunch of rich and jaded Hollywood stars?)

Jeesh [Re: wofahulicodoc] #227694
11/28/17 08:57 PM
11/28/17 08:57 PM
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Laoconic- lousy attitude

Do I detet a note of sarcasm here? [Re: may2point0] #227699
11/29/17 03:14 PM
11/29/17 03:14 PM
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NEWGATE

PRONUNCIATION: (NOO/NYOO-gayt)

MEANING: verb tr.: To imprison.
noun: A prison or a prison-like place or situation.

ETYMOLOGY: After Newgate, an infamous prison in London, in use since the 13th century, rebuilt many times, and torn down in 1902. The prison is so-named because originally it was located on the site of Newgate (a gate in the Roman London Wall). Earliest documented use: 1592.

NOTES: Some notable guests of the Newgate prison and their serious crimes:
-- William Penn, the founder of the state of Pennsylvania, for criticism of religion. While in prison, given paper to write a retraction, he instead wrote his treatise No Cross, No Crown
-- Daniel Defoe, the author of Robinson Crusoe for his satirical pamphlet about religion The Shortest-Way with the Dissenters
-- John Walter, the founder of The Times for libel on the Duke of York

The prison also had people come in for minor crimes, such as murder. For example, Ben Jonson, playwright and poet, got in for killing a man in a duel, but was released after reciting a Bible verse.

Newgate was a private prison, so inmates had to pay for everything: room, board, getting shackled and getting unshackled, and so on. Often, they were double-billed, but that may have been due to computer errors. Software was not as reliable in the 13th century.

Because running prisons for profit is such a humane thing to do, we have private prisons, even in the 21st century. Check out this report of an undercover investigation of a private prison.
___________________________

NETGATE - a router

NEWGAME - Sony-ese for "Start"

NEWBATE - what you put on the hook after you catch a fish

KEWGATE - how Londoners enter the Gardens

KNEWGATE - entrance for successful Jeopardy contestants

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