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May #222134 09/08/15 05:41 PM
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QUIXOTE

PRONUNCIATION: (kee-HO-tee, -tay, KWIK-suht)

MEANING: noun: Someone who is unrealistic, naive, chivalrous, idealistic, etc. to an absurd degree.

ETYMOLOGY: After Don Quixote, hero of the eponymous novel by Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616). Earliest documented use: 1644. The adjectival form is quixotic.
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QUIKOTE - new fast-drying paint

QUIQUOTE - the Faster Bartlett

QUIXOSE - an enzyme that digests QUIX (whatever that is)

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SANCHO PANZA

PRONUNCIATION: (SAN-cho)

MEANING: noun: A companion or sidekick, especially one who joins another in an adventure.

ETYMOLOGY: From Sancho Panza, the squire of Don Quixote. Sancho’s common sense contrasts with Don Quixote’s idealism. Earliest documented use: 1870.
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Did you know that Sancho sang a lot during his adventures with Don Quixote?
SANCHO LANZA

No, no, not the tenor, the basso of that Enchanted Evening.
SANCHO PINZA

And he became very pious and holy after the Don passed away -
SANCTO PANZA

Years later he was reincarnated as the sidekick of the son of that Computer Network equipment magnate -- you know, the Cisco kid.
PANCHO

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DUIXOTE where driving under the influence....


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DULCINEA

PRONUNCIATION: (duhl-SIN-ee-uh)

MEANING: noun: A ladylove or sweetheart.

ETYMOLOGY: From Dulcinea del Toboso, the mistress of Don Quixote. The name is derived from Spanish dulce (sweet) from Latin dulce (sweet) which also gave us dulcimer (a musical instrument), billet-doux (love letter), and dolce (softly, as in music direction). Earliest documented use: 1748.

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DUNCINEA - stupid emphasis added

SULCINEA - grooves in the National Endowment for the Arts

DULCIKEA - sweet furniture (some assembly required)

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P.S. Dulcinea was never a sweetheart or mistress, more the unattainable ideal that inspired Don Q to do Noble and Valiant and Worthy Deeds. Plenty of unilateral declaration of unswerving loyalty and devotion, but no mutual interaction.



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DULLCINEA-that inevitable person on the plane in the seat next
to you.

BULCINEA-Person on a cell phone and everyone can hear for
miles around, bull horn-like

CULCINEAThe ideal that one has to weed out idiots.

Last edited by LukeJavan8; 09/09/15 03:46 PM.

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DULCINEMA For me any film with Tom Cruise


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Dul-cinema- (Aromanian English) movie usher

Dul-cinema- (Scottish Gaelic English)
The Surprising Adventures of Baron Munchausen

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Slothario- a fictional character in the adaptation of against idleness and mischief, written by the devil

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LOTHARIO

PRONUNCIATION: (lo-THAR-ee-o)

MEANING: noun: A man who indiscriminately seduces women.

ETYMOLOGY: While the word was popularized after Lothario, a character in the play The Fair Penitent (1703), it first appeared in Don Quixote in which nobleman Anselmo tests his wife’s fidelity by recruiting his friend Lothario to seduce her. Earliest documented use: 1756.
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NOTHARIO - a would-be Don Juan who's lost his touch

LOTSARIO - what you get at Carnival time

OTHARIO - Horatio got all mixed up

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Rasinante- the grapes of wrath (post hoc ergo propter hoc)

P.S. Cool! I read Grapes of Wrath over 25 years ago in high school. I had no idea rocinante had any connection to Steinbeck. I was playing with raisin, grape and latin.

Love the learning. Thanks AWAD.

Last edited by May; 09/11/15 04:12 PM.
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