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PERNANCY

PRONUNCIATION: (PUHR-nuhn-see)

MEANING: noun: A taking or receiving of rent, profit, etc.

ETYMOLOGY: From Anglo-French pernance, by switching of sounds of prenance (taking), from prendre, from Latin prehendere (to seize). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ghend-/ghed- (to seize or to take), which is also the source of pry, prey, spree, reprise, surprise, osprey, prison, reprehend, impregnable, impresa, and prise. Earliest documented use: 1626.

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PERGNANCY - garvidity

PERRNANCY - the quality that makes one a Spanish dog

PERINANCY - Sluggo and Aunt Fritzi Ritz and those guys

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PENNANCY A flagging tendency.

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GIRN

PRONUNCIATION: (gurn)

MEANING:
verb intr.: To snarl, grimace, or complain.
noun: A grimace or snarl.

ETYMOLOGY: By transposition of the word grin, from Old English grennian (to show teeth). Earliest documented use: 1440.

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GIRVN - a foot soldier in the army oF the Republic of Viet Nam

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ANTIMETABOLE

PRONUNCIATION: (AN-ti-muh-TAB-uh-lee)

MEANING: noun: A repetition of words or an idea in a reverse order.
Example: "To fail to plan is to plan to fail."

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek antimetabole, from anti- (opposite) + metabole (change), from meta- (after, along) + bole (a throw). Earliest documented use: 1589.

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ANTIMETABLE - what the grammatically-challenged child might use to learn multiplication

ANATIMETABOLE - that new Medical School course where you learn not just the parts of the body and their relationships but also their biochemical pathways

ANDIMETABOLE - what else happened after I was screaming down the road on my motorcycle, and lost control, and ran into a tree

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ZEUGMA

PRONUNCIATION: (ZOOG-muh)

MEANING: noun: The use of a word to refer to two or more words, especially in different senses. Examples: "He caught a fish and a cold" or "She lost her ring and her temper."

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin zeugma, from Greek zeugma (a joining). Ultimately from the Indo-European root yeug- (to join), which is also the ancestor of junction, yoke, yoga, adjust, juxtapose, junta, junto, syzygy, jugular, and rejoinder. Earliest documented use: 1589.

NOTES: There's a similar term, syllepsis, but the two are more or less synonymous now. You could say zeugma is joined with syllepsis. Or the distinction between zeugma and syllepsis has lapsed now.

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[I would have pronounced it "TSOYG-ma"]

Other (non-original) examples, 50 years old at least (Thanks, Paul!):
"Are you going to New York or by bus?"
"Is it cooler in October or at the seashore?"

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ZEUGOMA - a German cheekbone

ZEUSMA - Rhea

ZENGMA - the inflexible principle of Enlightenment

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SYNECDOCHE

PRONUNCIATION: (si-NEK-duh-kee)

MEANING: noun: A figure of speech in which a part stands for the whole or vice versa.
Examples: "head count" to refer to the count of people or "the police" to refer to a police officer

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin synekdoche, from Greek synekdokhe, from syn- (together) + ekdokhe (interpretation). Earliest documented use: 1397.

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SKYNECDOCHE - a small city in the Hudson River in New York State, just west of Albany; home to Union College

SYNECLOCHE - a special French churchbell that rings only on New Year's Eve

wofahulicodoc #218983 10/30/14 03:36 PM
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EPANALEPSIS

PRONUNCIATION: (ep-uh-nuh-LEP-sis)

MEANING: noun: A figure of speech in which a word or phrase is repeated after intervening text. Example: "The king is dead, long live the king!"

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek epanalepsis, from epi- (upon) + ana- (back) + lepsis (taking hold). Earliest documented use: 1584.

USAGE: "What's it called if a word that appears at the beginning of a sentence is repeated at its end? Epanalepsis. Think of Brutus's speech at the funeral of Julius Caesar (in Shakespeare's revision, of course): 'Hear me for my cause, and be silent that you may hear: Believe me for mine honor, and have respect to mine honor, that you may believe.'" -- Bryan A. Garner; For the Word Lovers; ABA Journal (Chicago); May 2013.


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IPANALEPSIS - toothpaste used at the beginning of the day and at the end

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EPANALENSIS: What the cinematographer does to capture entire vistas.

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HENDIADYS

PRONUNCIATION: (hen-DY-uh-dis)

MEANING: noun: A figure of speech in which two words joined by a conjunction are used to convey a single idea instead of using a word and its modifier.
Example: "pleasant and warm" instead of "pleasantly warm"

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin hendiadys, from Greek hen dia duoin (one by two). Earliest documented use: 1589.

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HEN DIARYS - what we used to call gossipers' blogs

HENDI ANDYS - Jack-of-All-Trades

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HENDADYS: Rich roosters.

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