Wordsmith.org: the magic of words

Wordsmith Talk

About Us | What's New | Search | Site Map | Contact Us  

Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Page 1 of 6 1 2 3 4 5 6
Best words to be heard spoken in a British accent? #20071
02/25/01 06:26 PM
02/25/01 06:26 PM
Joined: Jan 2001
Posts: 1,816
Spam Factory
A
Alex Williams Offline OP
Pooh-Bah
Alex Williams  Offline OP
Pooh-Bah
A
Joined: Jan 2001
Posts: 1,816
Spam Factory
As an American I am all too painfully aware of how unmusical we are on this side of the pond compared with the British, the Irish and the Scots. What are some of your favorite British Isles expressions? Here are some of mine:

"Thanks, luv." (spoken by the female porter on the 19 bus in London)

"Right!" exclamation, sounds like "roit!"

"You're mad!"

"You can't be serious!"

"Oh Jesus!" Irish, sounds like "Oh Jaysus!"

"Good evening, and welcome to 'Masterpiece Theatre.'" Deeply imbedded in my synapses from youth.

"You bastard!" John Cleese as irate chef in restaurant

"Terribly sorry!" mumbled by a banker who has inadvertently stepped on your toe

"Sod this!" don't say it in front of the Queen







Re: Best words to be heard spoken in a British accent? #20072
02/25/01 06:46 PM
02/25/01 06:46 PM
Joined: Sep 2000
Posts: 2,788
Seattle, Washington, USA
Father Steve Offline
Carpal Tunnel
Father Steve  Offline
Carpal Tunnel
Joined: Sep 2000
Posts: 2,788
Seattle, Washington, USA

Respectfully submitted:

"What ho, Jeeves?"
"In the year that King Uzziah died ..."





Re: Best words to be heard spoken in a British accent? #20073
02/25/01 10:05 PM
02/25/01 10:05 PM

A
Anonymous
Unregistered
Anonymous
Unregistered
A


*nothing* beats the sincere, arduously well-pronounced and melodious way the jamaican people say "you are welcome".


Re: Best words to be heard spoken in a British accent? #20074
02/26/01 02:20 AM
02/26/01 02:20 AM
Joined: Nov 2000
Posts: 3,439
New England, USA
W
wow Offline
Carpal Tunnel
wow  Offline
Carpal Tunnel
W
Joined: Nov 2000
Posts: 3,439
New England, USA
As an American I am all too painfully aware of how unmusical we are on this side of the pond

Perhaps in the clarity of pronunciation the Brits we hear on imported radio and TV programs have an edge. But there are parts of England I visited where the English is hard to understand at best and incoherent at its worst.
I found some Scots accents quite sexy but I met just a few Scots at a party.
Irish accent can be musical (Kildare) high pitched (Kerry) broad and flat (Cork) or very hard to understand (Galway.) Barry Fitgerald who played Michaeleen in "The Quiet Man" had a west Ireland accent.
While here in US of A I have heard some delicious Southern accents, rugged western accents and the Indiana accent of my late husband was enough to raise goose bumps!
To my ear, "upper class" British accents, in some cases, lack any vestage of what could be called warmth. For an example send a private, ok?
So, I guess I take a friendly, poking the Borax, kind of umbrage.
wow



Re: Best words to be heard spoken in a British accent? #20075
02/26/01 06:57 AM
02/26/01 06:57 AM
Joined: Nov 2000
Posts: 3,146
Northamptonshire, England
Capital Kiwi Offline
Carpal Tunnel
Capital Kiwi  Offline
Carpal Tunnel
Joined: Nov 2000
Posts: 3,146
Northamptonshire, England
It's totally subjective and hardly worth arguing about!



The idiot also known as Capfka ...
Re: Best words to be heard spoken in a British accent? #20076
02/26/01 10:11 AM
02/26/01 10:11 AM
Joined: Jan 2001
Posts: 1,816
Spam Factory
A
Alex Williams Offline OP
Pooh-Bah
Alex Williams  Offline OP
Pooh-Bah
A
Joined: Jan 2001
Posts: 1,816
Spam Factory
Who's arguing?

I know what wow is talking about with the Socttish accents. Some of them are impossible to decipher. In a pub in northern Scotland, an older man accosted me and kept asking me something that I couldn't understand. I felt embarassed to have to keep saying "What?", and it didn't help matters that the fellow looked rather...irate. Finally his words became clear to me. He was asking "Are ye a German, lad?" To which I replied, "No sir I'm an American." Instantly his face blossomed into a smile and he clapped me on the back and said "Ah, you're a Yank are ye!" I got the impression that a "German lad" wouldn't have been very welcome in that particular pub.

It wasn't the only time I was mistaken for a German. In a train station I was accosted by a pan handler, and I stared at him blankly until he said half to himself "Oh, you're German! You don't understand a word I'm saying!" and walked off.




Veddy good #20077
02/26/01 12:18 PM
02/26/01 12:18 PM
Joined: Mar 2000
Posts: 11,613
Louisville, Kentucky
Jackie Offline
Carpal Tunnel
Jackie  Offline
Carpal Tunnel
Joined: Mar 2000
Posts: 11,613
Louisville, Kentucky
Has anyone else in N. America seen this as a supposed pronunciation of Brit-speak? My British friend had no idea what I was talking about, and says no one there says the word 'very' that way. I believe that, wherever I read it, it was attributed to the upper class.
Hi, Alex.


Re: Veddy good #20078
02/26/01 02:24 PM
02/26/01 02:24 PM
Joined: Mar 2000
Posts: 6,511
lower upstate New York
AnnaStrophic Offline
Carpal Tunnel
AnnaStrophic  Offline
Carpal Tunnel
Joined: Mar 2000
Posts: 6,511
lower upstate New York
Jackie,
I think it's related to the "tara" thang (hi, Jo!): we interpret the Brit flapped R to be either the voiced or unvoiced alveolar plosive (D or T) and hear "ta-ta"


Re: TTFN #20079
02/26/01 02:35 PM
02/26/01 02:35 PM
Joined: Apr 2000
Posts: 3,065
Jakarta
B
Bingley Offline
Carpal Tunnel
Bingley  Offline
Carpal Tunnel
B
Joined: Apr 2000
Posts: 3,065
Jakarta
Ta-ta and tara (pronounced more like turrah) are both used in the UK, although I associate tara mainly with the NE and London. There was a radio programme (I don't rember it myself) called TTFN -- Tata For Now.

Bingley


Bingley
Re: TTFN #20080
02/26/01 02:52 PM
02/26/01 02:52 PM
Joined: Dec 2000
Posts: 1,055
Berlin
B
belligerentyouth Offline
old hand
belligerentyouth  Offline
old hand
B
Joined: Dec 2000
Posts: 1,055
Berlin
there's always 'toodle-loo'

some of my other Brit favourites are
Crikey!
to be knackered
to take the mickey
and the timeless..
Tickity-Boo

(I'm sure the Brits will offer translations on demand)


Page 1 of 6 1 2 3 4 5 6

Moderated by  Jackie 

Forum Statistics
Forums16
Topics13,885
Posts224,998
Members9,064
Most Online3,341
Dec 9th, 2011
Newest Members
Ratharax, LVM, SHOSHOLOZA, kingword, notoftroy
9064 Registered Users
Who's Online Now
1 registered members (1 invisible), 124 guests, and 3 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Top Posters(30 Days)
Top Posters(All Time)
wwh 13,858
Faldage 13,803
Jackie 11,613
tsuwm 10,538
LukeJavan8 9,195
AnnaStrophic 6,511
Wordwind 6,296
of troy 5,400
Disclaimer: Wordsmith.org is not responsible for views expressed on this site. Use of this forum is at your own risk and liability - you agree to hold Wordsmith.org and its associates harmless as a condition of using it.

Home | Today's Word | Yesterday's Word | Subscribe | FAQ | Archives | Search | Feedback
Wordsmith Talk | Wordsmith Chat

© 1994-2018 Wordsmith

Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.6.1.1
(Release build 20180111)
Page Time: 0.034s Queries: 14 (0.007s) Memory: 3.1778 MB (Peak: 3.3585 MB) Zlib disabled. Server Time: 2018-08-20 19:01:46 UTC