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#164875 01/11/07 06:19 AM
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Quote:

So, "It's clear to me" means "I have understood what it means" while "I'm clear on that" means "I have made my points clear (so you should have understood)".

And "I'm clear about that" is ambiguous in meaning for it can mean both "I have made clear what you mean" and "I have made clear what I mean". So I would be recommended to avoid using it.

Am I clear on that? And has it been clear to me?


Callithump




I don't think there's a scintilla of difference between "It's clear to me." and "I'm clear on that."

"Are we clear" is more like "do we understand each other."

#164876 01/11/07 12:46 PM
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Quote:

So, "It's clear to me" means "I have understood what it means" while "I'm clear on that" means "I have made my points clear (so you should have understood)".




What tsuwm said is good advice. But to expand a little, normally one wouldn't claim to be clear in the "you should have understood" sense. You might ask someone if you are clear in this sense but it is a little presumptuous to claim to have been clear implying that the listener is some sort of idiot for not understanding. One might also say something like "I hope I'm clear on this." It's not so presumptive and it gets the point across.

#164877 01/11/07 03:23 PM
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Iím learning English. If you find anywhere I can improve my writing, Please do let me know.

Calli, you're doing just fine. Minor point: "ambiguous in meaning " is redundant


dalehileman
#164878 01/11/07 03:33 PM
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And "I'm clear about that" is ambiguous in meaning for it can mean both "I have made clear what you mean" and "I have made clear what I mean

***Right on, Calli. If you go back over the followups you will see that it can also mean "It's clear to me" and so you should indeed avoid using it

If you find anywhere I can improve my writing, Please do let me know.

***You are doing just fine, perhaps better than I. Minor point: "ambiguous in meaning" is redundant


dalehileman
#164879 01/11/07 07:25 PM
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Quote:

I don't think there's a scintilla of difference between "It's clear to me." and "I'm clear on that."




At least two scintillae, Shirley. "It's clear to me" is unambiguous while "I'm clear on that" leans heavily on the context. It could convey understanding or refer to a criminal charge or be part of an animated transparent tape testimonial.

#164880 01/12/07 12:19 PM
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I think it's not very clear to me again after reading on.

Does "I'm clear on that" mean "I understand that(something you just said) very clear" or "I have said that very clear (so you might have known what I mean)"? The former or the latter?

Thanks,

Callithump


Do inform me if you see any corrections needed in my written English.
#164881 01/12/07 02:45 PM
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The former, Sweetie.

It would be very rare for someone to say "I have made myself clear". Imagine that you are, for example, a teacher or a boss somewhere: no matter how clear YOU think your lesson or instructions have been, it is very likely that at least one person in the group did not understand completely. Therefore, we usually ask, "Have I made myself clear?", rather than announce the "fact" that we have.

#164882 01/12/07 03:40 PM
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calli} Very minor point, but one understands clearly, not clear

English is a tough language and you're still doing ok, don't give up


dalehileman
#164883 01/12/07 07:45 PM
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The phrase "are we clear on that" is one that would typically be used in the context of a power difference. To use a military setting, a general might say to a major, "Listen, we are not going to invade Crete. The discussion is over and I don't want to hear another word about it. Are we clear on that?" Here the general is expressing some irritation and he's "pulling rank" on his inferior. A major would never use the same expression to his superior the general, unless he wanted to risk being written up for insubordination.

On the other hand, to use the expression "it's clear to me" doesn't necessarily carry the same connotation. It would be perfectly polite for the major to say to the general, "Sir, based on my review of the intelligence, it is clear to me that to invade Sparta would be ill-advised." Here the major is using the phrase to mean that, after review of other material, he has arrived at a conclusion that he feels is sound.

#164884 01/13/07 10:26 AM
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Thanks, dale.


Do inform me if you see any corrections needed in my written English.
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