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indigoferous
indigo. n. dark blue colour and dye; plant yielding it. indigoferous, a. yielding indigo. indigotic, a. From the Hutchinson Encyclopaedia. ...

inexorable8
adj.
5L inexorabilis: see IN32 & EXORABLE6
1 that cannot be moved or influenced by persuasion or entreaty; unrelenting
2 that cannot be altered, checked, etc. !their inexorable fate"
in[ex#o[ra[bil4i[ty
n.
in[ex$o[ra[bly
adv.
inexpugnable
adj.
5LME < MFr < L inexpugnabilis < in3, not + expugnabilis, that can be taken by storm < expugnare, to take by storm < ex3, intens. + pugnare, to fight: see PUGNACIOUS6 that cannot be defeated by force; unconquerable; unyielding
in#ex[pug4na[ble[ness
n.
in#ex[pug4na[bly
adv.
When you can't get out of trouble by either prayer of fighting, all is lost.

infatuate - I learned this word in highschool English class. We were reading "A Tale of Two Cities" which opens with a peasant girl tied down on a bed by a French
nobleman. A wise guy persisted in asking the teacher, why the girl was tied down on the bed. She dared not tell him, and finally blurted "He was infatuated , I guess."

infatuate
vt.
3at#ed, 3at#ing 5< L infatuatus, pp. of infatuare, to make a fool of < in3, intens. + fatuus, foolish: see FATUOUS6
1 to make foolish; cause to lose sound judgment
2 to inspire with foolish or shallow love or affection
adj.
infatuated
n.
a person who is infatuated

infer
vt.
3ferred$, 3fer4ring 5L inferre, to bring or carry in, infer < in3, in + ferre, to carry, BEAR16
1 orig., to bring on or about; cause; induce
2 to conclude or decide from something known or assumed; derive by reasoning; draw as a conclusion
imply
vt.
3plied$, 3ply4ing 5ME implien < OFr emplier < L implicare, to involve, entangle < in3, in + plicare, to fold: see PLY16
1 to have as a necessary part, condition, or effect; contain, include, or involve naturally or necessarily !drama implies conflict"
2 to indicate indirectly or by allusion; hint; suggest; intimate !an attitude implying boredom"
3 [Obs.] to enfold; entangle
-SYN SUGGEST

Sometimes "imply" may be confused with infer. I once saw suggestion "I imply, from which you infer."