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#141828 04/08/05 01:01 PM
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One that may be peculiar to my region, and I don't hear white people say it. Using the word "until" where others would use "that". For example: "He was so busy until he didn't have time to eat." I've heard it several times. And "landed up" instead of "wound up", i.e. "I landed up taking the other bus when my regular one didn't show up."


#141829 04/08/05 01:53 PM
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I've never heard that use of until; it sounds very strange to me. But with the second phrase, I'm wondering if you might have misheard "landed up" and it was actually "ended up" - which I have frequently heard in that construction.


#141830 04/08/05 02:08 PM
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"Landed up to be" is the way *some old radio show* used it.


#141831 04/08/05 02:25 PM
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I've never heard the first one, birdfeed - interesting! The second didn't strike my ears as too unusual, though perhaps this is an Americanism I picked up years ago: a UK-limited google on "landed up" only hits 859 in the UK against 28,900 hits worldwide.


#141832 04/08/05 03:45 PM
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"I'm wondering if you might have misheard "landed up" and it was actually "ended up" - which I have frequently heard in that construction."

I thought I was mishearing it, too, so I listened carefully and that's what it was every time she said it. This person was a pretty odd specimen in many ways, and a good source for rural Georgia usage. She used some words I couldn't spell. "Stawb" is the best I can do for one of them. It seemed to indicate a large pole or stanchion that would tear off the door of your car should you strike it wrong. Which apparently she had.



#141833 04/08/05 04:34 PM
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birdfeed, is Dr Pedersen still around? Or is there a copy of the Lingusitic Atlas of the Gulf States there at the liberry?


#141834 04/08/05 04:34 PM
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Betcha the 'stawb' is the "stub" of a tree... you know, the part left when the tree has been cut down.


#141835 04/08/05 05:24 PM
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"birdfeed, is Dr Pedersen still around? Or is there a copy of the Lingusitic Atlas of the Gulf States there at the liberry?"

Possumbly. I think he's retired but still periodically haunts the place, just like my father. And I think that very opus is here in the library. I'll have to check. Right at the moment I have to do some, er, work.


#141836 04/12/05 10:38 PM
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I think I may have heard this before, long long ago. Or just possibly something my father talked about as a local (Shropshire) usage of 'when' where you are getting 'until'. Too many dead brain cells ago for me to be sure.

I think this is related to other sentence constructions trying to get the same or a very similar message across.
- He was busy to the point that he didn't have time to eat.
- He got busier and busier until he didn't have time to eat.
You might want to check with Bel but I think it works in French as well:
- 'Il était pressé jusqu'au point où il n'avait pas le temps pour manger.'

And possibly Latin, but I know I can't remember enough of that even to try and construct the sentence!


#141837 04/14/05 11:12 AM
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In "Cold Mountain" - the book, not the movie, haven't seen the movie, whole other rant - there is a character who has acquired the sobriquet of "Stobrod" because he was beaten with a piece of wood, so I think the "stub of a tree" thing is right on.
A couple of Irishisms are "the way that" and "how be". My dad would say "how be we go for a drive..." or whatever. It was, of course "how would it be if". "the way that" would be used as we would say "so that" - eg "I went yesterday, the way that I wouldn't meet him there today".



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