Wordsmith.org: the magic of words

Wordsmith Talk

About Us | What's New | Search | Site Map | Contact Us  

Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Page 2 of 4 1 2 3 4
Joined: Dec 2000
Posts: 13,803
Carpal Tunnel
Offline
Carpal Tunnel
Joined: Dec 2000
Posts: 13,803
Dive is a weak verb that recently people have been treating like a strong one

AHD4 has some interesting things to say about dive, pointing out that it is a conflation of two OE verbs, dyfan and dufan: http://www.bartleby.com/61/11/D0301100.html

They fail to mention, however, that, while dyfan was weak, dufan was strong. Its ablaut series was u, ea, u, o. Maybe, if I dig around long enough, I'll come up with a MnE verb that comes out of this ablaut series.


Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 247
W
enthusiast
Offline
enthusiast
W
Joined: Oct 2001
Posts: 247
AHD4 has some interesting things to say about dive... Maybe, if I dig around long enough, I'll come up with a MnE verb that comes out of this ablaut series.

Maybe if you dive around long enough, you will amuse me as much as you enlighten me, dear Faldage.

That would be good, too.




#131803 08/20/04 10:33 PM
Joined: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,475
J
veteran
Offline
veteran
J
Joined: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,475
They fail to mention, however, that, while dyfan was weak, dufan was strong.

Yes, indeed, but I think the strong dufan fell out of use first, unless of course some dialect preserved dove. Sleuth on! The Wortschatz is your huitre.


#131804 08/21/04 01:31 AM
Joined: Jan 2001
Posts: 1,816
A
Pooh-Bah
Offline
Pooh-Bah
A
Joined: Jan 2001
Posts: 1,816
My cat's breath smells like catfood... Actually, very interesting thread!


Joined: Mar 2000
Posts: 11,613
Carpal Tunnel
Offline
Carpal Tunnel
Joined: Mar 2000
Posts: 11,613
recently people have been treating like a strong one: dive ~ dived vs dive ~ dove. Wear and spit also were originally weak verbs, but are now strong. Don't tell me that people are now saying...spitted. Please.


Joined: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,475
J
veteran
Offline
veteran
J
Joined: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,475
Don't tell me that people are now saying...spitted. Please.

No, what I was saying is that the past tense of spit used to be closer to spitted (weak) than to spat (strong).


Joined: Mar 2000
Posts: 11,613
Carpal Tunnel
Offline
Carpal Tunnel
Joined: Mar 2000
Posts: 11,613
Ok; thanks.


Joined: Nov 2003
Posts: 81
J
journeyman
Offline
journeyman
J
Joined: Nov 2003
Posts: 81
I always thought "wrought" was from "work", but actually "wreak" looks good too, so I looked it up. "Wreak" and "wreck" are from one root, a rather violent one meaning driving or urging, and related to the Latin "urg-". This isn't the same as the unviolent "work", or if it is it's back in prehistory.


Joined: Mar 2000
Posts: 11,613
Carpal Tunnel
Offline
Carpal Tunnel
Joined: Mar 2000
Posts: 11,613
Gurunet says wrought comes from: [Middle English wroght, from Old English geworht, past participle of wyrcan, to work.]
Is work a weak verb? I have heard people speak of working metal, for ex., or that metal was worked. If I did some work, I worked. To me, wrought has more implication that something was created. Odd--does anyone actually say, today, that they (for ex.) wrought iron? I can only imagine someone saying they made wrought iron (wrought being an adjective here), or worked with wrought iron. Anything except that they wrought iron.


Joined: Dec 2000
Posts: 13,803
Carpal Tunnel
Offline
Carpal Tunnel
Joined: Dec 2000
Posts: 13,803
Yes, work (±wyrcan) was weak in OE.


Page 2 of 4 1 2 3 4

Moderated by  Jackie 

Link Copied to Clipboard
Forum Statistics
Forums16
Topics13,904
Posts228,148
Members9,152
Most Online3,341
Dec 9th, 2011
Newest Members
Tillie, typewriter33, Zekiye, silvercity_becky, gonekrazzzy
9,152 Registered Users
Who's Online Now
0 members (), 69 guests, and 7 robots.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Top Posters(30 Days)
Top Posters
wwh 13,858
Faldage 13,803
Jackie 11,613
tsuwm 10,542
LukeJavan8 9,821
AnnaStrophic 6,511
Wordwind 6,296
of troy 5,400
Disclaimer: Wordsmith.org is not responsible for views expressed on this site. Use of this forum is at your own risk and liability - you agree to hold Wordsmith.org and its associates harmless as a condition of using it.

Home | Today's Word | Yesterday's Word | Subscribe | FAQ | Archives | Search | Feedback
Wordsmith Talk | Wordsmith Chat

© 1994-2022 Wordsmith

Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.5