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Oct 14, 2016
This week’s theme
Verbs

This week’s words
confute
propine
flocculate
absolve
objurgate

This week’s comments
AWADmail 746

Next week’s theme
Words that appear to be coined after someone (but aren’t)
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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

objurgate

PRONUNCIATION:
(OB-juhr-gayt)

MEANING:
verb tr.: To scold severely.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin objurgare (to scold), from ob- (against) + jurgare/jurigare (to quarrel, to scold). Ultimately from the Indo-European root yewes- (law), which is also the source of jury, judge, just, injury, perjury, conjure, adjure and de jure. Earliest documented use: 1616.

USAGE:
“Occasionally he objurgated Mr. Ledbetter’s clumsiness, and urged him to hurry.”
H.G. Wells; Mr. Ledbetter’s Vacation; The Strand Magazine (London, UK); Jul-Dec 1898.

See more usage examples of objurgate in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
To read fast is as bad as to eat in a hurry. -Vilhelm Ekelund, poet (14 Oct 1880-1949)

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