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Jul 5, 2011
This week's theme
Contranyms, or words with an opposite set of meanings

This week's words
ravel
adjure
avocation
inure
adumbrate

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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

adjure

PRONUNCIATION:
(uh-JOOR)

MEANING:
verb tr.:
1. To command solemnly.
2. To request earnestly.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin adjurare (to put under oath), from ad- (to) + jurare (to swear), from jus (law). Ultimately from the Indo-European root yewes- (law), which is also the source of jury, judge, just, injury, perjury, conjure, and de jure. Earliest documented use: before 1425.

USAGE:
"If you go to Las Vegas -- and so many do -- please pay mind to the signs in the park. They don't adjure you from feeding the pigeons. They forbid feeding the homeless."
Jacquelyn Mitchard; Please Do Feed the Unsightly Homeless; Journal Sentinel (Milwaukee, Wisconsin); Oct 1, 2006.

"'Use Absolut,' he adjures a waiter at the restaurant." Amanda Vaill; A Story of Reckless Passion and Race; Chicago Tribune; May 25, 2003.

See more usage examples of adjure in Vocabulary.com's dictionary.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
When you want to fool the world, tell the truth. -Otto von Bismarck, statesman (1815-1898)

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