Wordsmith.org: the magic of words


A.Word.A.Day

About | Media | Search | Contact  


Home

Today's Word

Yesterday's Word

Archives

FAQ


Feb 24, 2010
This week's theme
Latin terms in English

This week's words
locum
ex cathedra
de jure
ad hominem
caveat

Many ways to read AWAD
o Email
o Web
o Twitter
o RSS feed
o On your own website
Discuss
Feedback
RSS/XML
Bookmark and Share Facebook Twitter Digg MySpace Bookmark and Share
A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

de jure

PRONUNCIATION:
(di JOOR-ee, day JOOR-ay, day YOO-ray, day JYOO-ray)

MEANING:
adverb: By right; by law.
adjective: Rightful.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin de jure (from the law). Ultimately from the Indo-European root yewes- (law) that is also the source of jury, judge, just, injury, perjury, and conjure. The complement of de jure is de facto meaning "in practice".

USAGE:
"Martin Luther King Jr. dedicated his life to fighting for civil rights and justice for America's black victims of de jure and de facto discrimination."
Bill Maxwell; To Honor King, Live Up to Him; St. Petersburg Times (Florida); Jan 17, 2010.

See more usage examples of de jure in Vocabulary.com's dictionary.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
For money you can have everything it is said. No, that is not true. You can buy food, but not appetite; medicine, but not health; soft beds, but not sleep; knowledge but not intelligence; glitter, but not comfort; fun, but not pleasure; acquaintances, but not friendship; servants, but not faithfulness; grey hair, but not honor; quiet days, but not peace. The shell of all things you can get for money. But not the kernel. That cannot be had for money. -Arne Garborg, writer (1851-1924)

We need your help

Help us continue to spread the magic of words to readers everywhere

Donate

Subscriber Services
Awards | Stats | Links | Privacy Policy
Contribute | Advertise

© 1994-2018 Wordsmith