Wordsmith.org: the magic of words


A.Word.A.Day

About | Media | Search | Contact  


Home

Today's Word

Subscribe

Archives



Aug 17, 2018
This week’s theme
Words from 1984 that are now a part of the language

This week’s words
newspeak
doublethink
Big Brother
unperson
oldspeak

Make Orwell Fiction Again
Make Orwell Fiction Again
Image: mardienyc

Bookmark and Share Facebook Twitter Digg MySpace Bookmark and Share
A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

oldspeak

PRONUNCIATION:
(OLD-speek)

MEANING:
noun: Normal English usage, as opposed to propagandist, euphemistic, or obfuscatory language.

ETYMOLOGY:
From George Orwell’s 1949 novel 1984. Earliest documented use: 1949.

USAGE:
“It quickly became apparent at the conference, however, that terms like psychedelic and hallucinogen are pretty much oldspeak. The neologism of the moment is entheogen -- meaning ‘the divine within’ -- at least at this conference.”
Richard Gehr; The State of the Stone; The Village Voice (New York); Nov 5, 1996.

See more usage examples of oldspeak in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
I have always supported measures and principles and not men. I have acted fearless and independent and I never will regret my course. I would rather be politically buried than to be hypocritically immortalized. -Davy Crockett, frontiersman, soldier, and politician (17 Aug 1786-1836)

We need your help

Help us continue to spread the magic of words to readers everywhere

Donate

Subscriber Services
Awards | Stats | Links | Privacy Policy
Contribute | Advertise

© 1994-2018 Wordsmith