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Apr 16, 2014
This week's theme
Words coined after Shakespearean characters

This week's words
dogberry
portia
timon
romeo
prospero

Timon
Timon of Athens
Art: Nathaniel Dance, 1767

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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

Timon

PRONUNCIATION:
(TY-muhn)

MEANING:
noun: One who hates or distrusts humankind.

ETYMOLOGY:
After Timon, the misanthropic hero of Shakespeare's play Timon of Athens. Earliest documented use: 1598.

USAGE:
"My soul was swallowed up in bitterness and hate ... I saw nothing to do but live apart like a Timon."
Upton Sinclair; Prince Hagen; Heinemann; 1903.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
The law, in its majestic equality, forbids the rich as well as the poor to sleep under bridges, to beg in the streets, and to steal bread. -Anatole France, novelist, essayist, Nobel laureate (1844-1924)

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