Wordsmith.org: the magic of words


A.Word.A.Day

About Us | What's New | Search | Site Map | Contact Us  


Home

Today's Word

Yesterday's Word

Archives

FAQ



Dec 30, 2011
This week's theme
Archaic words

This week's words
mickle
inwit
reechy
aby
mazard

mazard
Maplewood with silver-gilt mounts
Photo: Victoria and Albert Museum, London

This week's comments
AWADmail 496

Next week's theme
"New" words
Discuss
Feedback
RSS/XML
Bookmark and Share Facebook Twitter Digg MySpace Bookmark and Share
A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

mazard

PRONUNCIATION:
(MAZ-uhrd)

MEANING:
noun: Face, head, or skull.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Middle English mazer (a large wooden drinking bowl), from mazer (a hardwood, especially maple). It's not clear how we got from the bowl to the head, perhaps from the shape of the bowl. Earliest documented use: 1584.

USAGE:
"Shakespeare is really clear that the skull is handled roughly. You know, there's a line about being knocked about the mazard."
Barry Edelstein; On London's West End, 'Hamlet' With Human Skull; National Public Radio: All Things Considered (New York); Jun 4, 2009.

See more usage examples of mazard in Vocabulary.com's dictionary.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Wandering in a vast forest at night, I have only a faint light to guide me. A stranger appears and says to me: 'My friend, you should blow out your candle in order to find your way more clearly.' The stranger is a theologian. -Denis Diderot, philosopher (1713-1784)

A.Word.A.Day by email:

Subscribe

"The most welcomed, most enduring piece of daily mass e-mail in cyberspace."

The New York Times

Sponsored by:

Give the Gift of Words

Share the magic of words. Send a gift subscription of A.Word.A.Day.

Anu on Words:
Writer Magazine
Globe & Mail

Interact:

Bulletin board
Wordsmith Talk

Moderated Chat
Wordsmith Chat

Readers' Voice
AWADmail

Subscriber Services
Awards | Stats | Links | Privacy Policy
Contribute | Advertise

© 2014 Wordsmith