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Mar 11, 2011
This week's theme
Words with hidden animals

This week's words
corniche
cynic
aegis
pedigree
gazette

This week's comments
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Next week's theme
Seventeen-letter words to mark Wordsmith.org's septendecennial


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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

gazette

PRONUNCIATION:
(guh-ZET)

MEANING:
noun:
1. A newspaper (now mostly used in the name of newspapers, for example, the Montreal Gazette).
2. An official journal of an organization, for example, a government journal listing appointments, promotions, etc.

verb tr.:
1. To announce in an official journal.
2. To publish the appointment of someone in an official journal.

ETYMOLOGY:
From French, from Italian gazzetta (news sheet), from Venetian gazeta (a small coin), diminutive of gaza (magpie). The news sheet may have been named so because it sold for a gazeta or its content was compared to the chattering of magpies. The coin may have been named from its marking. Earliest documented use: 1607.

USAGE:
"The printing was completed last night and copies of the gazettes will be sent to the Parliament Secretariat this morning."
Oath in a Day or Two; The Daily Star (Dhaka, Bangladesh); Jan 2, 2009.

See more usage examples of gazette in Vocabulary.com's dictionary.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
At least one way of measuring the freedom of any society is the amount of comedy that is permitted, and clearly a healthy society permits more satirical comment than a repressive, so that if comedy is to function in some way as a safety release then it must obviously deal with these taboo areas. This is part of the responsibility we accord our licensed jesters, that nothing be excused the searching light of comedy. If anything can survive the probe of humour it is clearly of value, and conversely all groups who claim immunity from laughter are claiming special privileges which should not be granted. -Eric Idle, comedian, actor, and author (b. 1943)

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