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Jan 16, 2018
This week’s theme
Words of nautical origins

This week’s words
copper-bottomed
flotsam
leeway
jetsam
groggy

flotsam
Photo: Ludvigem

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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

flotsam

PRONUNCIATION:
(FLOT-suhm)

MEANING:
noun:
1. Goods found floating after a shipwreck.
2. People or things considered useless or unimportant.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Old French floter (to float). Ultimately from the Indo-European root pleu- (to flow), which is also the source of flow, float, flit, fly, flutter, pulmonary, pneumonia, pluvial, and fletcher. Earliest documented use: 1607.

USAGE:
“Lawrence momentarily regretted having damaged the book, but he didn’t bother picking it up. It could join the collection of flotsam on the floor.”
Cat Sebastian; The Lawrence Browne Affair; Avon; 2017.

See more usage examples of flotsam in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Be kind to thy father, for when thou wert young, / Who loved thee so fondly as he? / He caught the first accents that fell from thy tongue, / And joined in thy innocent glee. -Margaret Courtney, poet (1822-1862)

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