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rhopalic
periphrastic
epanorthosis
monepic
ploce
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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

epanorthosis

PRONUNCIATION:
(ep-uh-nor-THO-sis)

MEANING:
noun: The immediate rephrasing of something said in order to correct it or to make it stronger. Usually indicated by: no, nay, rather, I mean, etc.
Example: I've warned you a thousand, no, a million times.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Greek epanorthosis (correction, revision), from epi- (upon) + ana- (again) + orthosis (making straight), from ortho (straight).

MORE EXAMPLES:
God bless the King, -- I mean the faith's defender!
God bless -- no harm in blessing -- the Pretender!
(John Byrom)

No, let the monarch's bags and others hold
The flattering, mighty, nay, al-mighty gold.
(John Wolcot)

USAGE:
"But rather, simply the two most beautiful words in the language (let's face it, epanorthosis is my million-dollar baby)."
Michael Brodsky; We Can Report Them; Thunder's Mouth Press; 1999.

See more usage examples of epanorthosis in Vocabulary.com's dictionary.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
He felt justified to kill birds for a museum where they would be preserved forever, as some feel justified to eat fish, chicken, or other meat that is digested in hours. Which is more justified? And even if necessary, how do you justify? Those who are familiar with ancient folklore, or are up above the rest of us a moral notch or two, kill "respectfully" by offering prayers or apologies, in the hope that animals will "offer themselves" up to be voluntarily killed. However, it is a sad fact that no animal cares if those who might eat them invent reasons to justify their acts (to make themselves feel good). -Bernd Heinrich, biology professor and author (b. 1940)

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