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Sep 18, 2019
This week’s theme
Shakespearean insults

This week’s words
dotard
sodden-witted
scullion
knotty-pated
gorbellied

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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

scullion

PRONUNCIATION:
(SKUL-yen)

MEANING:
noun:
1. A servant who does menial work in a kitchen, such as washing dishes.
2. A lowly or contemptible person.

ETYMOLOGY:
Of uncertain origin, probably from Old French escouvillon (dishcloth, mop), diminutive of escouve (broom), from Latin scopa (broom) or from scullery (a small kitchen), from Old French escuele (dish), from Latin scutella, diminutive of scutra (pan). Earliest documented use: 1483.

USAGE:
“The exiled ex-monarch was attended by a huge number of maids, valets, gardeners, and scullions.”
Nazi Skeletons in Coco’s Closet; The Daily Telegraph (London, UK); Jul 13, 2019.

Falstaff: Away, you scullion! You rampallion! You fustilarian! I’ll tickle your catastrophe.”
William Shakespeare; Henry IV, Part 2; 1599.

See more usage examples of scullion in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
A decent provision for the poor is the true test of civilization. -Samuel Johnson, lexicographer (18 Sep 1709-1784)

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