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#98877 - 03/16/03 09:15 AM Information site
wwh Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 01/18/01
Posts: 13858
This site has a lot of information worth browsing.
http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0197622.html



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#98878 - 03/16/03 10:15 AM Re: Information site
Wordwind Offline
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Registered: 09/30/01
Posts: 6296
Loc: Piedmont Region of Virginia, U...
Good site for abbreviated Greek/Roman mythology.


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#98879 - 03/16/03 11:55 AM Re: Information site
wwh Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 01/18/01
Posts: 13858
"But wait! There's more"
Almanacs, Atlas, Dictionary, Encyclopedia e.g.:
Plutarch , A.D. 46?c. A.D. 120, Greek essayist and biographer, b. Chaeronea, Boeotia. He traveled in Egypt and Italy, visited Rome (where he lectured on philosophy) and Athens, and finally returned to his native Boeotia, where he became a priest of the temple of Delphi. His great work is The Parallel Lives comprising 46 surviving biographies arranged in pairs (one Greek life with one comparable Roman) and four single biographies; some 19 short comparisons affixed to the lives are of doubtful authenticity. The English translation by Sir Thomas North had a profound effect upon English literature; it supplied, for example, the material for Shakespeare's Coriolanus, Julius Caesar, Antony and Cleopatra, and Timon of Athens. A translation by John Dryden was revised by A. H. Clough in 1864. Although Plutarch displays evident pride in the culture and greatness of the men of Greece, he is nevertheless fair and honest in his treatment of the Romans. As a biographer Plutarch is almost peerless, although his facts are not always accurate. Since his purpose was to portray character and reveal its moral implications, his technique included the use of much anecdotal material. Less known, but also of great charm and interest, are Plutarch's Moralia (tr. by F. C. Babbitt et al., 14 vol., 192776). They consist of dialogues and essays on ethical, literary, and historical subjects, such as The Late Vengeance of the Deity, On Superstition, The Right Way of Hearing Poetry, and Advice to Married Couples. Plutarch's quotations (frequent and long) from the old dramatists are often our only record of such writings.

See biography by R. H. Barrow (1967, repr. 1979); studies by C. J. Gianakaris (1970), C. P. Jones (1971), D. A. Russell (1973), and A. Wardman (1974).




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#98880 - 03/16/03 12:01 PM Re: Information site
wwh Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 01/18/01
Posts: 13858
Wanna watch an eclipse?

Eclipses of the Sun and Moon, 2003

Note: The day of an eclipse is given in Universal Time (U.T.) and may start a day earlier or later depending on your time zone. (See Phenomena, 2003, to find time of eclipse.)

* May 16. Total eclipse of the Moon. The beginning of the umbral phase visible in Europe, southern Greenland, eastern North America, Central America, South America, most of Antarctica, Africa, western Middle East, the Atlantic Ocean, the southeast Pacific Ocean, and the western Indian Ocean; the end visible in the southern tip of Greenland, North America except the extreme northwest, Central America, South America, part of New Zealand, most of Antarctica, western Africa, western Iberian Peninsula, the Atlantic Ocean except the extreme northeast, and the eastern Pacific Ocean.
* May 31. Annular eclipse of the Sun. Visible in northeast Africa, Europe except Iberia (including the British Isles), northern Asia, northern Greenland, northern Canada, and Alaska.
* Nov. 89. Total eclipse of the Moon. The beginning of the umbral phase visible in Africa, Europe, western and central Asia, Greenland, the Arctic region, eastern North America, Central America, South America except the southern tip, coastal Queen Maud Land of Antarctica, the western Indian Ocean, and the Atlantic Ocean; the end visible in Europe, northwest Asia, the Arctic region, Greenland, North America, Central America, South America, Antarctic Peninsula, Africa except extreme eastern part, western Middle East, the Atlantic Ocean, and the eastern Pacific Ocean.
* Nov. 2324. Total eclipse of the Sun. Visible in Australia, New Zealand, Antarctica, the South Pacific Ocean, and the southern tip of South America.


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#98881 - 03/16/03 12:21 PM Re: Information site
wwh Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 01/18/01
Posts: 13858
As a bit of trivia, I remember about Abraham Lincoln winning a case by proving that a witness had lied when he said he had seen the defendant by the light of the moon in the act of committing a crime. Lincoln quoted from an Almanac which said there was no moonlight on the night in q;uestion.


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