Wordsmith.org: the magic of words

Wordsmith Talk

About Us | What's New | Search | Site Map | Contact Us  

Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Page 4 of 5 1 2 3 4 5
#841 - 08/13/00 05:18 PM Re: Shakespeare's language  
Joined: Apr 2000
Posts: 10,538
tsuwm Offline
Carpal Tunnel
tsuwm  Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Joined: Apr 2000
Posts: 10,538
this too shall pass
considering who he was playing to, it was probably street talk and slang.



#842 - 08/30/00 06:57 PM Re: English as a Global Language  
Joined: Aug 2000
Posts: 46
apples + oranges Offline
newbie
apples + oranges  Offline
newbie

Joined: Aug 2000
Posts: 46
Canada
English is my second language, while Polish is my first. But since I've lived in Canada almost half my life now, I've gotten used to speaking English and am more comfortable with using it rather than Polish. It's also interesting to see the surprise on my people's faces whenever I tell them that I didn't speak English at first.

I don't think that English will become a global language. The only reason it is rising in popularity is because of the numerous countries that use English as their main language, and the popularity of those countries around the world.


#843 - 09/23/00 03:37 AM Re: English as a Global Language  
Joined: Sep 2000
Posts: 29
metameta Offline
newbie
metameta  Offline
newbie

Joined: Sep 2000
Posts: 29
Sonoma County, California
"I don't think that English will become a global language. The only reason it is rising in popularity is because of the numerous countries that use English as their main language, and the popularity of those countries around the world."

But, apples + oranges, you see your argument carries the seeds of it's own destruction!
English will become the global language, but not the English of the English, nor the Dutch, nor the Egyptians nor the French, but I believe it is well on its way to becoming the lingua franca of the world, and in doing so will undergo many transformations.


#844 - 10/04/00 02:24 AM Re: English as a Global Language  
Joined: Sep 2000
Posts: 2,891
belMarduk Offline
Carpal Tunnel
belMarduk  Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Joined: Sep 2000
Posts: 2,891
Hmmmm. All this global language talk reminds me of a language that was being touted as the language of the future in the 70's - Esperanto. Anybody heard of it? I know there is still a restaurant in my city that still bears this name but I do not know if anyone still speaks it.

I do think English is increasingly being accepted as a global language. As an example, Health Canada (akin to the American FDA) has recently introduced some rules about the listing of ingredients on medicinal products (phase one which is already being implemented) and health and beauty products (phase two being implemented over next three years). The ingredient listings are a mixture of Latin (for most chemicals) and English. This has been designed in conjunction with the European community and is considered an <international> description. Far be it from me to disagree with these learned men but I think it is piffle. It does not take into account non English-speaking communities - and who speaks Latin in thier day-to-day lives.


#845 - 10/20/00 03:40 AM Re: English as a Global Language  
Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 4
antonio Offline
stranger
antonio  Offline
stranger

Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 4
Castlegar, BC, Canada
emanuela,

Ho confuso i vocaboli. "Thread" vuol dire filo. Come il filo di tessuto che e' composto di particelle attorcigliate e intrecciate per poi formare una tela, cosi' le parole formano il filo del discorso e del dialogo che e' diverso socondo il soggetto e chi lo trama.

L'inglese sta' attraversando le stesse fasi del Latino; diventa "volgare" a seconda della nazione che lo parla. Sono appena tornato da Trinida e ti assicuro che quell'inglese parlato non ha tanto in comune con l'inglese parlato in Canada.


#846 - 10/20/00 03:55 AM Re: English as a Global Language  
Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 4
antonio Offline
stranger
antonio  Offline
stranger

Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 4
Castlegar, BC, Canada
Let me join the debate in favor of each keeping the language currently in use. Each writer, even English writers, use different vocabulary to express the unique personal view of the universe. How can we then conceive that the universe can be described in one language only. The native Canadian people of the North have some forty different words for what we call "snow". Each language has the power to describe life in a particular environment and the globe is environmental varied. English alone will never do to describe it all. Perhaps in the sterile field of commerce and business English, like Latin in its days, may become the 'lingua franca' (just to make the point) but for the rest of human communications, to each his/her own language.


#847 - 10/21/00 01:25 PM Re: English as a Global Language  
Joined: Apr 2000
Posts: 10,538
tsuwm Offline
Carpal Tunnel
tsuwm  Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Joined: Apr 2000
Posts: 10,538
this too shall pass
antonio, you make some good points; but you'd do better by losing the '40 words for snow' example. it's an urban legend. I've seen the list and half the words relate to ice, and the rest can be attributed to a language that forsakes adjectives.

http://www.arctic.ca/LUS/Snow&Ice.html


#848 - 10/23/00 01:34 PM Re: English as a Global Language  
Joined: Mar 2000
Posts: 1,004
shanks Offline
old hand
shanks  Offline
old hand

Joined: Mar 2000
Posts: 1,004
London, UK
Thou speakest sooth, oh tsuwm.

I have jeard tell that, if we include phrases (as compound words), then English and Inuit have a comparably long list of words for water in the frozen state.

cheer

the sunshine warrior

ps. We must also somehow quash the base canard that some native American languages had no verb tenses, and their people, therefore, had no notion of time. Like the Margaret Mead issue, it was a result of an unnecessary leap taken by a researcher whose research was, in the first place, sketchy, to say the least. Stephen Pinker (The Language Instinct) is very good at puncturing such inflated apocrypha...


#849 - 10/30/00 02:20 AM Re: English as a Global Language  
Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 1
VerboTex Offline
stranger
VerboTex  Offline
stranger

Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 1
Chicago area
I was fortunate to spend 1997 in Québec City. I spoke no French when I arrived. I reminded me that in Texas the influx of Spanish speakers and their language now nearly precludes any attempt at "English as an Official Language" in the United States just as it can't be done in Canada. My fear is that the discrimination I felt as an English speaker in Québec is probably similar to that felt by Hispanic immigrants here.

Another, and possibly more important aspect of the spread of Spanish in North American (I include Toronto, at the very least) is that the language is changing rapidly as we adopt Spanish words into English at least as readily as our British ancestors did with French. This will inevitably widen the gaps between our language and that of our English-speaking counterparts in Europe, South Africa, and Australia/New Zealand.

As for Esperanto, I read recently that the language has a new generation of devotees who are again trying to get it adopted worldwide. Has anyone else seen such indication?


#850 - 10/30/00 03:39 AM Re: English as a Global Language  
Joined: Mar 2000
Posts: 11,613
Jackie Offline
Jackie  Offline

Carpal Tunnel

Joined: Mar 2000
Posts: 11,613
Louisville, Kentucky
Whoa! VerboTex, have you submitted your e-mail address to Anu's address-of-the-month contest? It'd get my vote, and welcome to you.

I agree--Spanish is becoming more and more evident here.


Page 4 of 5 1 2 3 4 5

Moderated by  Jackie 

Forum Statistics
Forums16
Topics13,879
Posts224,007
Members9,024
Most Online3,341
Dec 9th, 2011
Newest Members
TFED1, mark18, PureTech, Dilys, Abishek
9024 Registered Users
Who's Online Now
0 registered members (), 56 guests, and 2 spiders.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Top Posters(30 Days)
mark18 1
Dilys 1
Top Posters(All Time)
wwh 13,858
Faldage 13,803
Jackie 11,613
tsuwm 10,538
LukeJavan8 9,007
AnnaStrophic 6,511
Wordwind 6,296
of troy 5,400
Disclaimer: Wordsmith.org is not responsible for views expressed on this site. Use of this forum is at your own risk and liability - you agree to hold Wordsmith.org and its associates harmless as a condition of using it.

Home | Today's Word | Yesterday's Word | Subscribe | FAQ | Archives | Search | Feedback
Wordsmith Talk | Wordsmith Chat

© 1994-2017 Wordsmith

Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.6.0
Page Time: 0.014s Queries: 13 (0.003s) Memory: 2.7329 MB (Peak: 2.8677 MB) Zlib disabled. Server Time: 2017-10-22 21:09:23 UTC