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#43771 - 10/10/01 04:02 PM Re: Bull bars  
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wwh Offline
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To my amazement, "bull bars" can be had in the US. An ad with picture may be seen at:

http://ustruckaccessorieswhse.com/wes-main.html

I can't understand any objection to them as presenting any additional hazard to victims of collision.


#43772 - 10/10/01 04:25 PM Re: re: Bubblers  
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Capital Kiwi Offline
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(May as well get in a spot of Kiwi bashing to make it worthwhile).....Jest another example of NZ not being able to survive without Australia around to prop it up folks.

Oooooo, an invitation, an invitation! Just love 'em!

We don't call them "roo bars" in Zild. They're "bull bars". And because we don't (in common with the rest of the world, note) have that many loose bulls around, it's actually short for "bullsh*t bars". In other words, they're used to ward off errant Striners staggering back to their hotels/motels/doss houses/park benches from the pub any night of the week.

Thanks Stales, I owe you one!



The idiot also known as Capfka ...
#43773 - 10/10/01 04:31 PM Re: Bull bars  
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To my amazement, "bull bars" can be had in the US.

To your amazement? Bill, when SWMBO and I travelled across the States a couple of months ago, we saw the largest, fanciest and most ultimately useless sets of bullbars imaginable to man. And that was on every second damned ute we passed. Complete with longhorn skull and horns in a couple of memorable cases. If I hadn't been driving and had my camera ready, I could have enlightened you even further ....



The idiot also known as Capfka ...
#43774 - 10/10/01 04:41 PM Re: roo bars; bull bars; ped bars  
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they dramatically increased the injuries of a pedestrian involved in a collision with a car with bull bars fitted.

One of the Great Conundrums of Modern Life; by making our vehicles safer we make them more dangerous.


#43775 - 10/11/01 01:37 AM Re: taste/flavor  
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I response to original taste/flavour question... I think the difference may be in the way we use them.

I find I use flavour is most often used in two ways:
1) when describing the quality of what is being eaten. "it has a flavour reminiscent of cloves and thyme."
2) as a verb to signifying to add more taste or to season some food. "flavour a broth with cloves to make it a hearty and rich"

It is usually used in a positive sense. If it has a flavour, it’s good. Taste, on the other hand can be good or bad. Usually if something has a bad flavour we’ll say “this tastes bad.”

I don’t know if this helps you xara. My dictionary doesn’t make it any clearer as both words are used to describe the other.


(also, just to muddy the waters a little bit more, in my business, when we design a foam bath or shampoo, we create flavours instead of scents or aromas – I have NO idea why this is)


#43776 - 10/11/01 02:53 AM Re: taste/flavor  
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plutarch Offline
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In the final analysis, Zara, there is only one difference between "taste" and "flavor" (or "flavour" as those of us outside the U.S. spell it). "Taste" can be used metaphorically, as in: "She has great taste in clothing." "Flavor" does not have the same versatility. One cannot have great "flavor" in clothing, unless, of course, the clothing is woven with cotton candy.


#43777 - 10/11/01 03:27 AM Re: roos  
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xara Offline
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cary, nc, usa
called "bull bars" in the UK. ... they became a little less fashionable when it was shown that they dramatically increased the injuries of a pedestrian involved in a collision with a car with bull bars fitted.

i would call them cattle guards, and i can vouch for that statement about pedestrian collisions from person experience


#43778 - 10/11/01 03:40 AM Re: taste/flavor clothing  
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xara Offline
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cary, nc, usa
plutarch,
i don't know about that. you wouldn't have flavour in your choice of clothing, but you might have flavour in your life if you lead a very interresting one.


#43779 - 10/11/01 04:21 AM Re: taste/flavor clothing  
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plutarch Offline
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Yes, and you can have a flavouring of romance, as well, I concede. Maybe these flavour/taste metaphors, so different from one another, can help us to distinguish their forebears. Interesting, is it not, that words which are interchangeable when employed literally are not interchangeable when employed metaphorically?


#43780 - 10/11/01 10:50 AM Re: taste/flavor  
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Bean Offline
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(also, just to muddy the waters a little bit more, in my business, when we design a foam bath or shampoo, we create flavours instead of scents or aromas – I have NO idea why this is)

I've always used the word flavour to describe scented products. In fact, my husband is terribly allergic to anything scented, so we live in a scent-free household these days. However, when we're at the store and trying to choose between, say, "Sensitive skin Dove" and "Unscented Dove" I will ask him which flavour it is that he uses. Somehow the word fits the situation better. It's not just about the scent, it's the whole product - the texture, consistency, feel of it, as well as the smell. Like a flavour of ice cream, for example - it's not just defined by the smell. So we talk about flavours (or non-flavours, really) of soap and shampoo and deodorant in my house.


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