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#3234 - 06/09/00 05:29 PM Re: spickets and figs  
Joined: Mar 2000
Posts: 1,981
jmh Offline
Pooh-Bah
jmh  Offline
Pooh-Bah

Joined: Mar 2000
Posts: 1,981
Syrup of figs helps you go when you just can't.


#3235 - 06/10/00 11:07 AM Re: spickets and figs  
Joined: Mar 2000
Posts: 11,613
Jackie Offline
Jackie  Offline

Carpal Tunnel

Joined: Mar 2000
Posts: 11,613
Louisville, Kentucky
>>Syrup of figs helps you go when you just can't.<<

I guess the brevity of this post is what led me to note the
proximity (applicability??) of enthusiast!
Sorry, Jo!



#3236 - 06/10/00 06:44 PM Re: spickets and figs  
Joined: May 2000
Posts: 112
David108 Offline
member
David108  Offline
member

Joined: May 2000
Posts: 112
Auckland, New Zealand
>>Syrup of figs helps you go when you just can't.<<

Jackie -

I seem to remember that Jo's line is a quotation verbatim from the advert for the product, circa 1950!

If it wasn't, it should be! And, incidentally, the brand name that I remember is "California Syrup of Figs".

Go figger!




#3237 - 06/12/00 07:31 AM Re: gringo/yankee  
Joined: May 2000
Posts: 679
Rubrick Offline
addict
Rubrick  Offline
addict

Joined: May 2000
Posts: 679
Somewhere outside New York
> I think the reason Anna used that term is that she lives in
"Dixieland". (Technically, I do too, but Kentucky was neutral during the American Civil War, and is not the "Deep South"
geographically.)

I did not know this! This is presumably why Lincoln was in such a quandry during the war. He was a Kentuckian (despite his affiliations with the Hoosier state) and members of his family fought on both sides - though up until now I never knew why. If you can, read his autobiography which, next to that of Ulysses Grant, is one of the greatest works of factual literature to come out of the US.


#3238 - 06/14/00 01:41 AM Re: gringo/yankee  
Joined: May 2000
Posts: 28
Lucy Offline
newbie
Lucy  Offline
newbie

Joined: May 2000
Posts: 28
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Jackie,

Don't mind at all. Am Down Under - Melbourne, where the Olympic Games aren't.




#3239 - 06/15/00 04:53 PM Re: American terms  
Joined: Jun 2000
Posts: 4
hpr Offline
stranger
hpr  Offline
stranger

Joined: Jun 2000
Posts: 4
Nebraska, USA
Hold on--I thought I just read something recently that "dixie" came from the French word for ten,"dix". This is a vague memory, but it had something to do with the money they were using...? Sound familiar, anyone?


#3240 - 06/15/00 05:13 PM Re: dixie  
Joined: Apr 2000
Posts: 10,538
tsuwm Offline
Carpal Tunnel
tsuwm  Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Joined: Apr 2000
Posts: 10,538
this too shall pass
try doing a 'google' search on the phrase "dixie origin", without the quotes -- the first couple of hits should give you the whole magilla of possible etymologies...

http://google.com


#3241 - 06/15/00 08:40 PM Re: dixie  
Joined: Jun 2000
Posts: 4
hpr Offline
stranger
hpr  Offline
stranger

Joined: Jun 2000
Posts: 4
Nebraska, USA
Thanks, Michael!
The Google search was new to me. The dix note was the French currency in use by New Orleans banks during the war. However, there are several other explanations for the word's origin.
If I'm going to be reading this forum I'm going to need a new dictionary. Mine does not include the word "magilla". I assume, from context, it means a whole boat-load?



#3242 - 06/15/00 08:58 PM Re: American terms  
Joined: Jun 2000
Posts: 1
carita Offline
stranger
carita  Offline
stranger

Joined: Jun 2000
Posts: 1
According to my Colombian in-laws, the word gringo is derived from when the military came into the latin countries. The locals would reference their coloured clothing and tell them - "green go".




#3243 - 06/16/00 06:23 PM Re: dixie  
Joined: May 2000
Posts: 112
David108 Offline
member
David108  Offline
member

Joined: May 2000
Posts: 112
Auckland, New Zealand
>>Mine does not include the word "magilla". I assume, from context, it means a whole boat-load?<<

There was a thread discussing Yiddish terms that have become common usage in English - look under Miscellany > Translations, for more.

Magilla, (or more correctly, "Megillah", means a long involved story or account <the whole megillah> (Webster)









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