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#19483 - 02/18/01 10:54 PM Re: Mangled English for Corporate Identity  
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Geoff Offline
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Geoff  Offline
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Portland,Oregon, USA
I guess QANTAS is easier to paint on the tail of an aeroplane than the full mouthful!

OK, WOW, let us in on the QANTAS acronym. I'm not an Ozzie, and have never been there, but I know it too. I'll start us off with "Queensland And..." Your turn!


#19484 - 02/19/01 09:23 AM Re: Mangled English for Corporate Identity  
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Capital Kiwi Offline
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Northamptonshire, England
QANTAS - flew with them last week. They bought out Ansett NZ a few months ago. I won't spoil your fun about what the name means, but tell me this:

How do you pronounce it? I mean, QUANTAS would be very easy - kwan-tas. But no "u"? A proofreader at the newspaper I used to work for insisted, in a strictly curmudgeonly way of course, on always pronouncing it "kan-tas". Used to drive his copyholders nuts. Or at least ... I think that's why they were nuts! [confused-on-reflection emoticon]



The idiot also known as Capfka ...
#19485 - 02/19/01 09:51 AM Re: Mangled English for Corporate Identity  
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wsieber Offline
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1- You can't trademark an ordinary (correctly spelled) word.
2- You want your brand to be unique, yet easily remembered, so it has to sound half-familiar, half exotic. Who will remember that "Xerox" was derived from greek xeros, dry, for being the first copying process doing away with messy liquids?
3- Corparations want to remain flexible in their expansion of business. So they don't want to be tied to a particular type of article by their brand name. Maybe this is now the unhappy fate of Xerox. Modern names of corporations avoid association with a product, either by using an acronym of their former name (BASF is an early example), or a fully "synthetic" name like e.g. Syngenta ("born" last year).


#19486 - 02/19/01 12:52 PM Re: Mangled English for Corporate Identity  
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Bean Offline
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Here's a confusing one...

In the Canadian provinces of Alberta and British Columbia, the phone company is now called "TELUS" (they used to be BCTel and AGT, Alberta Government Telephones). I think they meant it to sound like "Tell us" but instead, it looks like it's an American telephone company - "Tel US". Which it isn't!


#19487 - 02/19/01 12:54 PM Re: Mangled English for Corporate Identity  
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Geoff Offline
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You want your brand to be unique, yet easily remembered... and Corporations want to remain flexible in their expansion of business. So they don't want to be tied to a particular type of article by their brand name.

Well, I guess that explains why General Electric's logo has been around unchanged for a century! No need for cutesy yuppie-sounding tripe. Most products use electricity, so the name has plenty of latitude. It fits your criteria well, with old-fashioned script. So much for being "modern!"


#19488 - 02/19/01 01:06 PM Re: Mangled English for Corporate Identity  
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Geoff Offline
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Geoff  Offline
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In the Canadian provinces of Alberta and British Columbia, the phone company is now called "TELUS"

Very interesting! You have a phone company named for an ancient Roman goddess of the Earth and of fertility! They left out one "l," but phonetically it's the same. Tell us if you have a population explosion among telephone users in BC and Alberta!


#19489 - 02/19/01 02:15 PM Re: Mangled English for Corporate Identity  
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Solamente, Doug. Offline
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Virginia
Well, I guess that explains why General Electric's logo has been around unchanged for a century! No need for cutesy yuppie-sounding tripe. Most products use electricity, so the name has plenty of latitude. It fits your criteria well, with old-fashioned script. So much for being "modern!"

Geoff:
I've done a tiny bit of corporate branding work for GE, it's interesting to note that most of their business now has nothing at all to do with electricity. Their wonderful logo is based on the shape of a fan's rotor blade to reflect one of their earliest products. Most of their marketing these days is to promote their financial assurance services so they never, ever refer to themselves as General Electric anymore. I'm thrilled though that they've kept their old logo intact.


#19490 - 02/19/01 04:05 PM Re: Mangled English for Corporate Identity  
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wow Offline
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OK, WOW, let us in on the QANTAS acronym. I'm not an Ozzie, and have never been there, but I know it too. I'll start us off with "Queensland And..." Your turn!
Sorry to be so long answering. Although my life seems to be mainly this board other things do intrude.

Queensland And Northern Territories Airways Service.
So there! Thought you'd caught me out? HA!
Now about that discount ... nobody knows?
wow


#19491 - 02/19/01 04:14 PM Re: Mangled English for Corporate Identity  
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wow Offline
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New England, USA
Mumbles heard from afar : "There she is making another post." As she shamelessly works her way toward Old Hand status!
There's an apocryphal story about brand names:
The Japanese had just designed and produced another automobile and it was set to go except for a name. The auto makers decided to call a German auto maker for a suggestion When the situation was explained the German asked when they needed an answer.
"Today!" the Japanese said.
In accented English the German said:
"That soon?"
"Thank you" said the Japanese gentleman
And so that's how Datsun go its name.
(Apologies to our German friends. It's meant as a friendly joke!)
wow


#19492 - 02/19/01 05:42 PM Re: Mangled English for Corporate Identity  
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wwh Offline
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To demonstrate my remarkable command of the obvious, names like "Rite-Aid" arise from the constraints on usage of everyday names or words in a copyright.


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