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#164079 - 12/06/06 03:29 PM Re: Active in the morning  
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AnnaStrophic Offline
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Quote:

matinal ... and vespertine Named for the church services, or were the church services named for the time of day? (In other words, which came first?)






Latin was around before The Church, fwiw.

#164080 - 12/06/06 03:31 PM Re: Active in the morning  
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this too shall pass
Quote:

denoting animals active in the morning (dawn) and evening (dusk) - conclusion: matinal is more specific for morning (of course this will not be the last word ).




of course. we should consider the poor animals which are active at both times. know any zo-ologists?

edit: "[A] well known crepuscular animal is the moose, which often comes out in early morning hours or late evening hours." - Wikipedia

Last edited by tsuwm; 12/06/06 04:01 PM.
#164081 - 12/06/06 04:48 PM Re: Active in the morning  
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Well known matinal animal is the bird and he catches the worm too.
But there are birds that are early as well as late ,like the blackbird. He always takes a second round of the garden at and right after sundown. He sings, both at dawn and nightfall.I guess there are so many animals that are active both at crepuscule and at dawn. But matinal active or the right word for that, is that decided yet?

Last edited by BranShea; 12/06/06 06:11 PM.
#164082 - 12/06/06 04:58 PM Re: mourning activates  
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R'lyeh
Does the Evening Star have the same sense as the Morning Star?

For what it's worth, the earlier meaning of twilight is for the period of inbetween light of both morning and evening. And what of dusk and gloaming?


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
#164083 - 12/06/06 07:25 PM Re: mourning language becomes no one  
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Quote:

And what of dusk and gloaming?




And then there's penumbra...

Maybe we should consider that English, pretty bastard that she is, might have more than one word to denote the same thing?

#164084 - 12/07/06 10:35 AM Re: mourning language becomes no one  
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Quote:

And then there's penumbra...





A nice word too, penumbra , penombre, doesn't that rather mean half shadow?
So not directly attached to dawn or dusk ?
So at noon men and animals can hide from the sun in the penumbra , the half shadows.

#164085 - 12/07/06 02:41 PM Re: mourning language  
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R'lyeh
Latin paene 'almost': peninsula, penultimate, etc.


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
#164086 - 12/07/06 04:55 PM Re: mourning language  
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Quick definitions (penumbra)
noun: a fringe region of partial shadow around an umbra

Etymology: New Latin, from Latin paene almost + umbra shadow -- more at UMBRAGE
1 a : a space of partial illumination (as in an eclipse) between the perfect shadow on all sides and the full light b : a shaded region surrounding the dark central portion of a sunspot


2 : a surrounding or adjoining region in which something exists in a lesser degree : FRINGE
3 : a body of rights held to be guaranteed by implication in a civil constitution
4 : something that covers, surrounds, or obscures : SHROUD <a penumbra of secrecy> <a penumbra of somber dignity has descended over his reputation -- James Atlas>
- pen·um·bral /-br&l/ adjective

#181839 - 01/18/09 11:55 AM Re: Active in the morning [Re: wsieber]  
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Amicose Offline
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Does anone know a term specific to the afternoon? There are a few desert reptiles principally active after desert sun passes its peak, heat, so there's certainly a use for it.

Matitudinal also occurs as a form of matutinal.

Last edited by Amicose; 01/18/09 11:56 AM.
#181842 - 01/18/09 02:10 PM Re: Active in the morning [Re: Amicose]  
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R'lyeh
Does anone know a term specific to the afternoon?

I couldn't find one, but as matutinal < Latin matutinalis < matutinus < Matuta 'goddess of the dawn', vespertine < vesper 'evening', diurnal < diurnalis < dies 'day', nocturnal < nocturnalis < nox, noctis, 'night', crepuscular < crepusculum 'dusk, twilight' < creper 'dusky, dark'. The Latin word for afternoon is pomeridianus or postmeridianus. So, how about pomeridianalar? (Also, the Latin word for afternoon meal is merenda. Maybe that could be used.)


Ceci n'est pas un seing.
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