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#147618 - 09/08/05 05:28 PM Re: Deacon Blue  
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Buffalo Shrdlu Offline
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Vermont
I'm not going to pick sides in this one...



formerly known as etaoin...
#147619 - 09/08/05 08:12 PM considerate  
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tsuwm Offline
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this too shall pass
according to Festus, derived from s{imac}dus, s{imac}der- star, constellation. The vb. might thus be originally a term of astrology or augury, but such a use is not known in the Lat. writers.



note to Faldo: ī <> {imac}


#147620 - 09/08/05 09:30 PM Re: considerate  
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note to Faldo:  <> {imac}

Hey! I'm reading this on an iMac. You think I can't see imac?

An I still wanna know what fsigma is.


#147621 - 09/08/05 10:17 PM Re: fsigma  
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this too shall pass
The overall rule on final versus non-final sigma is simply that, where the sigma terminates what may be understood to be a distinct word of Greek, it is final, otherwise, it is non-final.

hth.


#147622 - 09/08/05 10:47 PM Siderated: "Ill-fated" or "blasted" ?  
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ullrich Offline
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So when used to mean "struck with lightning" it is synonymous with "unlucky" in the sense of being "star-crossed" or merely "blasted" as if by a constellation? Perhaps in the same sense that the root of "disaster" in "astrum" records a former belief in astrology.



#147623 - 09/09/05 05:37 AM Re: predate, schredate  
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wsieber Offline
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Switzerland
I'm astsuming the root is the tsame. It's that assumption which is at the root of the trouble:
The latin sidus (-eris), star, is apparently not directly related to greek sideros, iron.


#147624 - 09/09/05 06:44 AM I don't get it.  
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ullrich Offline
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And yet as a combining form, "sidero-" means both (iron and star). An orthographical coincidence of Greek and Latin etymologies?

[Rhetorical aside to self: Why are extraneous t's being inserted into certain words on this board? An in-joke originating with tswum?]


#147625 - 09/09/05 09:32 AM Re: I don't get it.  
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>Why are extraneous t's being inserted into certain words on this board? An in-joke originating with tswum?]

You tsure tsummed that up tsuperbly.

And a belated welcome to our board. Sorry for the little glitches that happened previously, but we've hopefully done what needs to be done to minimize further damage.



TEd
#147626 - 09/09/05 09:36 AM Re: Siderated.  
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This siderated word is all a proofreader's error. He was setting the following sentence: The proctors at the school decided that my side rated another star.

Unfortunately, an en-space disappeared between side and rated, and google picked up siderated and the next thing you know there were fifty thousand googlits. A star (word) is born.



TEd
#147627 - 09/09/05 12:37 PM Re: I don't get it.  
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[Rhetorical aside to self: Why are extraneous t's being inserted into certain words on this board? An in-joke originating with tswum?]

I guess some of us like to play with language as much as discuss it. No in-joke. Just a rhetorical device.


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