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speaking of funny dishes, what about #142584
05/04/05 02:35 AM
05/04/05 02:35 AM
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rego park
of troy Offline OP
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of troy  Offline OP
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rego park
mugs, or drinking vessels?

on a recent Antiques Roadshow (US/PBS version--oregon)--some one showed up with a copper and silver trophy--it was a large hammered copper vessel, with ornate silver scrollwork at the base, and three handles--made from stags horns.

the expert appraiser said it was a sort of tyg

Onelook has only one listing for the word tyg... and that listing defines a tyg as a 12 handled vessel.

so... has anyone here (hi tsuwm!) ever heard of a tyg? anyone have a dictionary that list a tyg? and why a tyg? any other words with tyg as part of the word?

(any care besides me? its a good scrabble word for sure!)


Re: speaking of funny dishes, what about #142585
05/04/05 04:28 AM
05/04/05 04:28 AM
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Seattle, Washington, USA
Father Steve Offline
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I picture such a vessel in the hands of a Viking and the word looks Nordic, as well.


Re: speaking of funny dishes, what about #142586
05/04/05 09:38 AM
05/04/05 09:38 AM
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Faldage Offline
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Brick & Mortar OED has it:

A name said to have been formerly given in the Staffordshire potteries to a porringer; now applied by antiquaries and collectors to a drinking-cup with two or more handles, attributed to the 17th and 18th c.

Now, let's look up porringer:

A small basin or similar vessel of metal, earthenware, or wood, from which soup, broth, porridge, children's food, etc., is eaten.


Re: speaking of funny dishes, what about #142587
05/04/05 12:44 PM
05/04/05 12:44 PM
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Seattle, Washington, USA
Father Steve Offline
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There were a lot of Vikings in Staffordshire, right?



Re: speaking of funny dishes, what about #142588
05/04/05 07:00 PM
05/04/05 07:00 PM
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Posts: 17
Finland
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Miia Offline
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Finland
After consulting several swedish and multilingual dictionaries, I found only one meaning for the word tyg: cloth, fabric. In Norwegian, the verb tygge also means to chew, but this is the only reference to eating and drinking that I could find with my rather poor Swedish skills. However, I did find a picture from an English website which was similar to your description:
http://www.metmuseum.org/explore/Tiffany/metal02_larger.html
Kinda puzzling, I'd say. Hope someone has an access to something that could explain where the word tyg has come to English...


Re: speaking of funny dishes, what about #142589
05/04/05 10:28 PM
05/04/05 10:28 PM
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British Columbia, Canada
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Zed Offline
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British Columbia, Canada
How does one drink out of a 12 handled mug? For that matter, why does one drink out of a 12 handled mug?
(Fill it too often and you'd see 24.)


Re: speaking of funny dishes, what about #142590
05/04/05 11:18 PM
05/04/05 11:18 PM
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Posts: 48
Central Ohio
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Saranita Offline
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Saranita  Offline
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Central Ohio
*laughing at Zed's post*

Filling it just often enough, I'd say.


Re: speaking of funny dishes, what about #142591
05/05/05 11:24 AM
05/05/05 11:24 AM
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Posts: 1,692
UK
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dxb Offline
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UK
Hope someone has an access to something that could explain where the word tyg has come to English... ~ Miia


The twelve-handled mug was originally used in jury rooms. It was grasped by each of the jurors to demonstrate their agreement on a verdict. By custom it was filled with strong mead to help the jurors to relax and, by each taking a drink in turn, heal any wounded feelings resulting from the arguments necessary to reaching the verdict. After the twelfth man had drained the last of the mead they could depart in peace and camaraderie. Tyg is an acronym for twelve yeoman’s gill, a gill being a fluid measure in some districts reckoned as a quarter pint and in others as a half pint.


Re: speaking of funny dishes, what about #142592
05/05/05 11:25 AM
05/05/05 11:25 AM
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Posts: 500
Northern Ontario, Canada
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Elizabeth Creith Offline
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I was actually thinking the word looked Welsh - dunno why that should cross my mind.


Re: speaking of funny dishes, what about #142593
05/05/05 11:50 AM
05/05/05 11:50 AM
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Posts: 5,400
rego park
of troy Offline OP
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rego park
gill is a 1/4 pint (4 oz)--or it has been all my life-- a half gill is 2 oz, (or a large 'shot') In US a shot (of whiskey) is defined as 1.5 ounces..
(pint,-16 oz, half pint-8oz., gill-4 oz., , half gill-2 oz.)

well the tyg on the show, wasn't a 24 oz (12 X 2) mug! --in fact, it was a trophy for the best in show Spanniel at a dog show.


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