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Re: tire that egg #101066
04/16/03 07:34 PM
04/16/03 07:34 PM
Joined: Apr 2000
Posts: 10,538
this too shall pass
tsuwm Offline
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this too shall pass
there are four unique verbish tires (6 nouns), the third of which goes something like this:

1. refl. To put oneself in order to do something; to get ready; also, to get ready to go somewhere; to take one's way, go. Cf. ATTIRE v.1 1, 2; DRESS v. 6, 15. Obs.

2. trans. a. To equip; to fit out with arms, accoutrements, etc.; to arm; = ATTIRE v.1 3a.
b. To attire, clothe duly, dress, adorn; = ATTIRE v.1 3b. Obs.
c. To dress (the hair or head), esp. with a tire or head-dress (TIRE n.1 3); = ATTIRE v.1 3c. arch.

3. To plaster or decorate (a building). Now dial.

4. spec. To prepare or dress (an egg) as food.




Re: Carving terms #101067
04/16/03 08:43 PM
04/16/03 08:43 PM
Joined: Oct 2000
Posts: 5,400
rego park
of troy Offline
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rego park
Re:praps after the shell is removed and it's sliced hard-boiled?

well, eggs now days are so cheap and common, we forget they were once a luxury food...

yes, you can slice them (and before those neat egg slicers, it wasn't easy!) or you can cut them in half long wise,(say for deviled eggs), or in half narrow wise, (and then deftly cut a slice of the bottom, so they will stand up like a little gold filled cup..)
when cooked to perfection, (the yolk should be just set, but still custardy) the egg cup can be set on a leaf (edible, of course) and garnished with toasted seseme seeds to make a very elegant first course for a luncheon.

i have also seen whole (hard boiled) eggs (quail, or other small bird eggs) carved to have swirls that start at the top and end at the bottom (similar spirals are sometimes cut in mushrooms caps)

one dish from tudor times involved stuffing a goose with a capon, the capon with duck, the duck with something, all the way down to a wren...
another dish would stuff a chicken with hard boiled eggs.. and carving the stuffing would be an art..

poached eggs are often trimmed to make them prettier and neater...

and different eggs are different sizes.. (already discussed on an other thread kiwi eggs, etc)

and many different eggs were served. i have only eaten chicken, duck and quail...( i passed when offered turtle eggs) but goose eggs, and pidgeon eggs were also common.

come on Juan... you started this thread... presumibly because you realize how food term (and term relating to food preparation have changed)


Re: tire that egg #101068
04/17/03 01:18 AM
04/17/03 01:18 AM
Joined: Apr 2000
Posts: 3,065
Jakarta
B
Bingley Offline
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Jakarta
Hence tiring woman. I'd always leapt from tiring woman to attire without realising that that tire could mean the same.

Bingley


Bingley
Re: tire that egg #101069
04/17/03 04:43 PM
04/17/03 04:43 PM
Joined: Jun 2002
Posts: 1,624
Utter Placebo, Planet Reebok
Capfka Offline
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Capfka  Offline
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Utter Placebo, Planet Reebok
Anyway, very neatly self-referential, Juan. BTW, 1675 is ever so slightly - like, about 72 years - later than the Tudor period. They'd even finished up the Thirty Years War and had a Civil War of their very own in England by then. Just thought I'd mention it, of course.


Re: tire that egg #101070
04/17/03 05:26 PM
04/17/03 05:26 PM
Joined: Mar 2001
Posts: 4,189
Rio Grande, Cape May County, N...
WhitmanO'Neill Offline OP
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WhitmanO'Neill  Offline OP
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Yes, Cap, the Tudor period ended in 1603, but those carving words were coined during that period. Their carrying over a mere 72 years is a drop-in-the-bucket, linguistically. And it was the only decent refernce I could find after extensive searching. If you can produce a more "timely" and comprehensive list of these terms, please do. I'd really like to see it...along with that original Art of Carving text.


Re: Carving #101071
04/17/03 05:36 PM
04/17/03 05:36 PM
Joined: Jun 2002
Posts: 7,210
Vermont
Buffalo Shrdlu Offline
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Art of Carving

well, now yer talking about downhill skiing...



formerly known as etaoin...
OK, who made the thread go wide? #101072
04/18/03 12:28 PM
04/18/03 12:28 PM
Joined: Mar 2000
Posts: 6,511
lower upstate New York
AnnaStrophic Offline
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I'd like to read through this, but.


Re: OK, who made the thread go wide? #101073
04/18/03 02:35 PM
04/18/03 02:35 PM
Joined: Mar 2001
Posts: 4,189
Rio Grande, Cape May County, N...
WhitmanO'Neill Offline OP
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WhitmanO'Neill  Offline OP
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Rio Grande, Cape May County, N...
Wide, AnnaS? All the links are short enough or made shorter, and the thread's framed normal size for me? I'll try to shorten the initial link, maybe the Mac screen is expanding to that. Otherwise, I dunno. (edit: made the first two links short, see it that does it).


Yep, thanks, Juan! #101074
04/18/03 03:51 PM
04/18/03 03:51 PM
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Posts: 6,511
lower upstate New York
AnnaStrophic Offline
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I'm not sure which link it was, but whatever you did fixed the not-Mac-but-rather-small-screen-related problem.


Re: Tudor Food Words #101075
04/19/03 08:10 PM
04/19/03 08:10 PM
Joined: Mar 2001
Posts: 4,189
Rio Grande, Cape May County, N...
WhitmanO'Neill Offline OP
Carpal Tunnel
WhitmanO'Neill  Offline OP
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Joined: Mar 2001
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Rio Grande, Cape May County, N...
potato correction

Saw the show again today and I was slightly off about the potato, as Helen pointed out. More specifically, potatoes weren't introduced until the reign of Elizabeth I and then didn't become popular until the 1800s.


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