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Is there a "babelfish" for Latin?

Posted By: Max Quordlepleen

Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? - 09/17/00 07:18 PM

Is there a site that will translate Latin? I never took Latin, and while I can often get the gist of phrases, it would be nice to have a site that could fill in the gaping holes in my vocabulary. I came across the italicised phrase below, and while I I know that there are many people who post here capable of translating it for me, I have no intention of asking for a translation every time I get stuck. A web-based translator would be a great asset for the semi-literate, it could be said to be "pro utilate hominem."

Vir prudens non contra ventum mingit.

Posted By: Max Quordlepleen

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? Addendum - 09/17/00 07:37 PM

Vir prudens non contra ventum mingit.

As it happens, I found the translation. I was only missing the verb - I had successfully discerned that "a wise man doesn't 'mingit' against the wind", and just needed to have "mingit" translated. That's why a site like babelfish would come in handy, to supply key words that are unfamiliar. If nothing like it exists, would anyone care to rectify that?


Posted By: tsuwm

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? Addendum - 09/17/00 08:54 PM

as long as you bring it up, retromingent is a very odd word derived from Latin.

http://members.aol.com/tsuwm/rst.htm#retromingent
Posted By: Max Quordlepleen

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? Addendum - 09/17/00 09:05 PM

retromingent

How does one do that? And please don't say, "with great difficulty" or "very carefully"

Posted By: Jazzoctopus

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? Addendum - 09/18/00 09:42 PM

a wise man doesn't 'mingit' against the wind",

Having not taken any Latin, but living in a generation where one's peers thrive on unconspicuously crude jokes and quotes, I'm guessing that 'mingit' means urinate.

Posted By: jmh

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? Addendum - 09/20/00 08:10 AM

"mingit"

I wonder if that would help with a current popular Scottish slang word - "minging" - usually pronounced mingin', apparantly means smelly or dirty but applied to anything unpleasant.

The only reference in a dictionary I can find is in Websters which says it means minced which doesn't work at all for current usage.


Posted By: Bridget

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? Addendum - 09/20/00 09:44 AM

>I wonder if that would help with a current popular Scottish slang word - "minging" - usually pronounced mingin', apparantly means smelly or dirty but applied to anything unpleasant<

Do either mingit or mingin relate to mingy? I always assumed that it came from 'mean' and 'stingy' (and that's what Cambridge on-line said - thanks for bringing the listing back up tsuwm!), but now I'm not so sure

Posted By: tsuwm

Re: mingy - 09/20/00 02:47 PM

M-W says "perhaps" a blend of mean and stingy -- so they don't know (or aren't saying ;)


Posted By: RhubarbCommando

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? - 09/25/00 10:08 AM

Is there a site that will translate Latin?


My colleague (who took a first in Classics) has provided me with the following:-
Perseus project at Tufts is the best source - there's a mirror at Oxford: http://perseus.csad.ox.ac.uk/

A version of Lewis & Short is available at http://perseus.csad.ox.ac.uk/cgi-bin/resolveform?lang=Latin

More general lexica and text tools at http://perseus.csad.ox.ac.uk/lexica.html

(the oxford site is sometimes down - to get to the original substitute tufts.edu for csad.ox.ac.uk. There's also a mirror in Berlin http://perseus.mpiwg-berlin.mpg.de)

Happy translating!

(just realised this is my 100th post. I'm really glad that it is an attempt to be constructive and helpful, rather my usual outpouring of pomposity, poor puns and poking fun at others)


Posted By: maverick

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? - 09/25/00 02:11 PM

my 100th post


Congratulations!

(Am I the first to have cent this message?)

Posted By: RhubarbCommando

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? - 09/25/00 03:17 PM

There's not been a scent of any one else - many thanks, boyo

Posted By: maverick

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? - 09/25/00 04:25 PM

not been a scent of any one else

They obviously lack the cents and/or scentsability

Posted By: Max Quordlepleen

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? - 09/25/00 08:50 PM

my sincerest contrafibularities on hitting the tonne, and what a wonderfully helpful way to mark the occasion. Thank you very much for those excellent resources.

Posted By: RhubarbCommando

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? - 09/27/00 08:58 AM

lack the cents and/or scentsability

You're too harsh - if they haven't the scents it is probably because the haven't the Thyme.

Posted By: RhubarbCommando

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? - 09/27/00 09:01 AM

My pleasure.

contrafibularities

This is a new word to me! Why should you wish to set anything against my shin bone?

Posted By: wsieber

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? - 09/27/00 09:06 AM

>contrafibularities This is a new word to me! <
I guess this would be the lawyers term for "withershins" .

Posted By: RhubarbCommando

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? - 09/27/00 09:29 AM

contrafibularities - - - the lawyers term for "withershins

Excellent! Would it also equate to the swashbuckling pirate's phrase. "Shiver me timbers." (thinking of John Silver's wooden leg).

BTW, any idea as to what a "swash" is, and where one would buckle it?

Posted By: maverick

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? - 09/27/00 09:36 AM

Well, guru gives this for swash:

Swagger or bluster.
A swaggering or blustering person

So I guess you place your buckle ostentatiously!

Posted By: jmh

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? Addendum - 09/27/00 10:40 AM

Do either mingit or mingin relate to mingy?

The idea of mean and stingy sounds reasonable for mingy.

Mingin' has a hard "g" like singing so I've never thought of it as being realted to stingy with its soft "g".

Posted By: jmh

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? - 09/27/00 10:43 AM

>contrafibularities

This could be something to do with pulling the other leg so Long John Silver maybe on the right track.

Posted By: TEd Remington

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? Addendum - 09/27/00 02:09 PM

>Having not taken any Latin, but living in a generation where one's peers thrive on unconspicuously crude jokes and quotes, I'm guessing that 'mingit' means urinate.

And your guess would be exactly right. Something about the Latin verb mingo rang a tiny bell in the back of my mind. In it's major parts it is mingo, mingere, micti, mictus, I suspect, an etymological echo of the verb fingo, fingere, ficti, fictus, which is the one I do remember from my two years of Latin MANY years ago. (Fingere means to form.) I looked up micturate, which means urinate, and the dictionary obligingly reported that the word comes from micturire, to want to urinate, from mingere, to urinate.



Posted By: RhubarbCommando

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? Addendum - 09/27/00 02:56 PM

micturate, which means urinate

I have for many years wondered if "micturate" is the word that is shortened in "Taking the Mick" - not least because of the less polite form in which that sentiment is sometimes expressed.

or am I micturating up the wrong tree?

Posted By: TEd Remington

Taking the Mick??? - 09/27/00 03:30 PM

What, pray tell, is "taking the Mick?"

Posted By: jmh

Re: Taking the Mick??? - 09/27/00 07:45 PM

Taking the mickey = poking fun, often Irish
sometimes referred to as "extracting the Michael"
never known who Michael was though!


Posted By: Max Quordlepleen

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? - 09/27/00 07:57 PM

contrafibularities

Sorry! That word is a reference to a very funny episode of the British comedy series "Blackadder." The episode involves Dr. Samuel Johnson and his dictionary. There is a scene in which Johnson boasts that his dictionary includes every word in the English language. Blackadder extends his "contrafibularities" as part of a ninety second monologue full of made up words - it's very funny, at least I found it to be so.


Posted By: tsuwm

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? - 09/27/00 08:22 PM

EBlackadder: "Contrafibularities, sir. It is a common word down our way."

SJohnson: "Damn!"

EB: "Oh, I'm sorry, sir. I'm anaspeptic, frasmotic, even compunctuous to have caused you such pericumbobulation."
.
.
EB: "Of course, sir. I shall return...interfrastically."
.
.
KingGeorge : "Look, Doctor Johnson, I may be as thick as a whale omelette, but even *I* know a book's got to have a plot."


Posted By: Max Quordlepleen

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? - 09/27/00 08:35 PM

You are a prince!

Thanks for that, I shall dig up my old tapes now and watch it again. One of my favourites was the definition offered for the letter "C": "Big blue wobbly thing what mermaids live in."

Posted By: Marty

Re: Taking the Mick...and micturate - 09/27/00 08:37 PM

Certainly in Australia, "taking the piss" is a well-known expression, although Olympic drug-testing officialdom has imparted a more literal meaning to the phrase.

Posted By: AnnaStrophic

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? - 09/27/00 11:55 PM

Looks like Max has still to find a "babelfish" for Latin....

sic transit gloria ciber(sic)-mundi

Posted By: Bridget

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? - 09/28/00 04:08 PM

>the definition offered for the letter "C": "Big blue wobbly thing what mermaids live in." <

Moving the subject on again entirely, can anyone assist me with the missing parts of the following alphabet. I never knew and my father has forgotten...

'Ay for 'orses
Beef or mutton
Sea for ships
Dee for salmon
'Eave a brick
Effervescent
G?
H?
Ivor Novello
J?
K?
'Ell for leather
Emphasis
N?
Over the Rainbow
P?
Queue for buses
'Arf a mo
Esther Rantzen
Tea for two
You for me
V?
Double you for quits
X?
Wife o' mine
Z?



Posted By: tsuwm

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? - 09/28/00 04:17 PM

well, I was bafflefished as to "Esther Rantzen" and so I googled this marvel[l]ous ref:

http://www.geocities.com/TelevisionCity/Stage/5786/britcult.html

Posted By: tsuwm

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? - 09/28/00 04:22 PM

oh, and lest I forget here's the link to the Cockney Alphabet:
http://www.phespirit.demon.co.uk/ck_alpha.htm

Posted By: jmh

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? - 09/28/00 08:19 PM

Love the link twu

Ah dear Esther, not sure she's be pleased to be so close to Enoch Powell but then that's life.

Posted By: Marty

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? - 09/28/00 09:08 PM

I had no idea there were so many alternatives. Just too many witty people in the world, I guess. The alternatives on my list that haven't been covered by Bridget or by tsuwm's Cockney website reference are:

E for Adam (Eve or Adam)
K for Ancis (Kaye Francis)
N for a Dig ("infra dig", beneath one's dignity)
S for Williams (Esther Williams)
U for Mism (euphemism)
Y for Heaven's Sake

Posted By: Bridget

Re: Is there a "babelfish" for Latin? - 10/01/00 09:54 AM

Thank you tsuwm and Marty!

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