Wordsmith.org
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Mensopause III - 05/07/14 05:50 PM
...restarting because our alphabetical spammer has posted in Mensopause II, and Moderatrix can't delete if the post has been replied to...
______________________________________________________

SAMSON

PRONUNCIATION: (SAM-suhn)

MEANING: noun: A man of extraordinary physical strength.

ETYMOLOGY: After Samson, a judge in the Old Testament, known for his great strength. From Hebrew Simson (man of sun). Earliest documented use: 1565

-----------------------------------

SANSAN - a tiny piquant-tasting lozenge for freshening the breath of Japanese gentlemen
Posted By: jenny jenny Mensopause III - 05/07/14 08:09 PM

SANSOON - a snide comment (usually whispered) to express the opinion that you think someone will be soon be sent to a loony-bin.

Etymology: a combine of san a pejorative term for a insane asylum and soon indicating...uh...soon.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc SAMSON - 05/07/14 11:58 PM

Quote:

SANSAN - a tiny piquant-tasting lozenge for freshening the breath of Japanese gentlemen

Hey, Wofa, that's TWO changes. You can't do that, it's against the Roooz !

Oops, you're right. I take it back. Try again:

SALMSON - red caviar, hatched and grown-up
Posted By: jenny jenny Re: SAMSON one 'mo time - 05/08/14 02:47 AM

INDIAN GIVER! frown



RAMSON
- a ransom paid in wild garlic (Old World tradition)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Where's that Yoda when you need him? - 05/08/14 03:26 PM

JEREMIAD

PRONUNCIATION: (jer-uh-MY-uhd)

MEANING: noun: A long lamentation, mournful complaint, or a prophecy of doom.

ETYMOLOGY: After Jeremiah, a Hebrew prophet during the seventh and sixth centuries BCE, who prophesied the fall of the kingdom of Judah and whose writings are collected in Lamentations in the Old Testament. Earliest documented use: 1780. Also see jeremiah.

----------------------------

JEDEMIAD - A long lamentation, mournful complaint, or a prophecy of doom, regarding the return of the Empire for three more episodes...with Mark Hamill, Carrie Fisher, and Harrison Ford, plus younger versions of same

VEREMIAD- what the people will be after they spend trillions to keep the sea from rising and it falls instead.
Methuselah

PRONUNCIATION: (meh-THOO-zuh-luh)
MEANING:
noun:
1. An extremely old person.
2. An oversized wine bottle holding approximately six liters.
ETYMOLOGY:
After the biblical figure Methuselah, who is said to have lived 969 years. Earliest documented use: 1390.
-----------------------------------------------------

METHUSER-AH - ah, O Saki, it is said that the meth user will be dead within 969 days. That, O Saki, is a lie. A meth user is dead on the first day.

Posted By: wofahulicodoc 'Atsa toughie - 05/10/14 01:56 AM

Well, there's METH/USE/LAW, but you used that idea already.

Or METH/SELAH - best you pause and think soberly about using that stuff

I think I'll go with
METHOUSELAH - the sixth note of an opera singer's scale (MET HOUSE "LAH")
Posted By: jenny jenny Re: 'Atsa toughie - 05/10/14 04:21 PM
Originally Posted By: wofahulicodoc



I think I'll go with
METHOUSELAH - the sixth note of an opera singer's scale (MET HOUSE "LAH")



Hey, not bad, Codoc.

To my many self-described highbrow friends I will begin describing my many pothead friends as being...
"...higher than a MET House Lah". smile
Posted By: jenny jenny Monday's Word: Two for one. - 05/12/14 05:06 AM
lazaretto

PRONUNCIATION: (laz-uh-RET-o)
MEANING:
noun:
1. A medical facility for people with infectious diseases.
2. A building or ship used for quarantine.
3. On a ship, a space between decks used as storage.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Italian lazzaretto, a blend of lazzaro + Nazareto. Lazzaro is the Italian version of the name Lazarus, the name of a beggar covered in sores as described in the New Testament (Luke 16:20). Nazareto was the nickname of a hospital, after Santa Maria di Nazareth, the name of the Church on the island where it was located. Earliest documented use: 1549.
USAGE:
"The Council House was a frame building, away from the rest, that had been built in the old, wilder days as a lazaretto for surly drunks."
Kurt Vonnegut; Player Piano; Charles Scribner's Sons; 1952.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
I never lose sight of the fact that just being is fun. -Katharine Hepburn, an actress who had fun for 96 years (1907-2003)
________________________________________________________

LAZYRETTO - a mental hospital for purposeless people who don't know that just being alive is fun.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Monday's Word - 05/12/14 01:19 PM

PLAZARETTO - a very small public gathering place, the center of a tiny village

LAMARETTO - a sweet almond-flavored cordial preferred by Buddhist monks
bumptious

PRONUNCIATION: (BUHMP-shuhs)
MEANING:
adjective: Self-assertive in an obnoxious way.
ETYMOLOGY:
Probably a blend of bump + fractious or a blend of bump + presumptuous. Earliest documented use: 1803.
_________________________________________________

BUMTIOUS - the attribute of having a shapely bum.
As in the song:
I can't dance
I can't talk
The only thing about me
Is the way I walk



UMPTIOUS - making wild and arbitrary calls at the plate, throwing people out of the game for no reason - in short, acting like a spoiled and overindulged baseball referee. A combination of "RAMBUNCTIOUS" and ... oh, you get the point.
slimsy

PRONUNCIATION: (SLIM-zee)
MEANING:
adjective: Flimsy; frail.
ETYMOLOGY:
A blend of slim + flimsy. Earliest documented use: 1845.
-----------------------------------------------------

SLIMEY -
1) worse than slimsy
2) like a snake
3) like slime
4) like a politician

SHIMSY - borogoves that twerk
(a combination of shimmy and mimsy, as in "Mimsy were the borogoves." I know it's true, because I read it in Jabbewocky.)

And then there's SLIMSTY, a resort for pigs on a diet



PS: Has anyone proposed that "twerk" is a combination of "Twist" and "Jerk"?
Posted By: jenny jenny A song about Slim in Mississippi - 05/15/14 01:28 PM
A ditty-wah-ditty about Slim and a waterfall in Mississippi

Me and Slimsy were climbing atop a waterfall in Mississippi.
Suddenly Slimsy slipsy and then slidsy and slamsy into the slime pool below. Slimsy can't swimsy but that didn't matter. The highest waterfall in flat Mississippi is measured in inches.

Posted By: wofahulicodoc speak softly and carry a big one - 05/15/14 02:51 PM

STICTION

PRONUNCIATION: (STIK-shuhn)

MEANING: noun: The frictional force that must be overcome to set one object in motion when it is in contact with another.

ETYMOLOGY: A blend of static + friction. Earliest documented use: 1946.

[Lectors note: I would propose it's rather "sticky + friction.")

------------------------------------------

STICKION - a microscopic subatomic Post-It note for labelling atoms
Posted By: jenny jenny Thursday's blendword is STICTION - 05/15/14 03:11 PM
stiction

PRONUNCIATION: (STIK-shuhn)
MEANING:
noun: The frictional force that must be overcome to set one object in motion when it is in contact with another.
ETYMOLOGY:
A blend of static + friction. Earliest documented use: 1946.

USAGE:
"Thom watched the nurse's backside as she left the low gravity and the stiction in her shoes made her suggestive."
R.E. Wilder; Captain Thom and Orions Thunder; Dog Ear Publishing; 2009.
A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
When you re-read a classic, you do not see more in the book than you did before; you see more in yourself than there was before. -Clifton Fadiman, editor and critic (1904-1999)
________________________________________________________

TICTION (TICK-shuhn ) - The frictional force that must be overcome to set one object in motion when it is in contact with another.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Thursday's blendword is STICTION - 05/15/14 03:26 PM

Also -

TICTION - why it's so hard to get that blasted bloated blood-sucking insect off. Today, a biting tick; tomorrow, Lyme disease !!
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Thursday's blendword is STICTION - 05/16/14 06:04 PM

MUZZY

PRONUNCIATION:
(MUHZ-ee)

MEANING: adjective:
1. Mentally confused.
2. Blurred; indistinct.

ETYMOLOGY: Perhaps a blend of muddled + fuzzy. Earliest documented use: 1728.

-------------------------------

MR UZZY - the guy who invented that popular semi-automatic machine pistol

MUZZA - a less popular Greek fast food; found on the menu four lines above PIZZA
Posted By: jenny jenny Who's afraid of Fuzzy Wuzzy? - 05/16/14 06:50 PM
WUZZY - the politically incorrect term "muzzy" in the 1728 folkpoem cited below* was changed to "wuzzy" in 2008 because it was feared that it might offend the world's wild-eyed radical Muslims. Instead the word "wuzzy" offended the wild-eyed radical feminists of the world regardless of their creed, race, color, or lack thereof. crazy

*Fuzzy Wuzzy was a bear
Fuzzy Wuzzy had no hair
Fuzzy Wuzzy wasn't fuzzy was she?
Posted By: jenny jenny Word of Today: OPHELIAN - 05/19/14 01:44 PM
Ophelian

PRONUNCIATION:(o-FEE-lee-uhn)
MEANING:
adjective: Displaying madness, suicidal tendencies, and similar characteristics.
ETYMOLOGY:
After Ophelia, a character in Shakespeare's Hamlet, who is driven to insanity and kills herself. Earliest documented use: 1903.
USAGE:
"She had an Ophelian streak of potential craziness that he had, since day one, deemed wiser to steer clear of."
Jean-Christophe Valtat; Aurorarama; Melville House; 2010.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
The thing that makes you exceptional, if you are at all, is inevitably that which must also make you lonely. -Lorraine Hansberry, playwright and painter (1930-1965)
---------------------------------------------------

OPHELLIAN (adj.) - the L added to emphasize the depths of Ophelia's madness and pain.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc or, The Moor the Merrier - 05/19/14 07:28 PM

OTHELIAN - well-meaning, parent-wise, but ultimately frustrated by the squabblings of his children.


(Oops. Should have been more leery of that one, and looked it up before I posted, not after.)
Posted By: jenny jenny Tuesday's word: BENEDICT - 05/20/14 04:45 PM
benedict

PRONUNCIATION: (BEN-i-dikt)
MEANING:
noun: A newly married man, especially one who was previously thought to be a confirmed bachelor.
ETYMOLOGY:
From alteration of Benedick, character in Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing. Earliest documented use: 1821.
USAGE:
"Columbus Moise, the old bachelor lawyer, who is soon to be a benedict, answered the toast."
Miguel Antonio Otero; My Life on the Frontier, 1882-1897; 1935.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: ****
A person may cause evil to others not only by his actions but by his inaction, and in either case he is justly accountable to them for the injury. -John Stuart Mill, philosopher and economist (1806-1873)

=================================================================

BENEDIT (BIN-et-it) - heavy-handed editing as with an axe.

ETYMOLOGY: Shakespeare's drinking companion, Ben Jonson, edited several of Shakespeare's plays, mostly with spleen and spite.
After reading a yet-unnamed play Ben scrawled in big letters across the cover, THIS IS MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING. The bard set down his drink and said "Rightly so, Ben" Then smiled.

Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Tuesday's word: BENEDICT - 05/20/14 05:19 PM

BENTDICT - afflickted with chordee. See Jack Shaftoe, in Neal Stephenson's Baroque Trilogy, if you need a really long Summer read.

BESEDICT- kiss and tell

BENEDIRT - rich loamy soil
Posted By: jenny jenny Re: Tuesday's word: BENEDICT - 05/21/14 03:44 AM
BENEVICT - a movement to evict Bums, Elves, and Ne'er-do-wells who live their lives in public buildings where government people work...or, uh...don't work.
Posted By: jenny jenny A Word A Wednesday: HAMLET - 05/21/14 02:11 PM
Hamlet

PRONUNCIATION:(HAM-lit)
MEANING:
noun:
1. An apprehensive, indecisive person.
2. A small village.
ETYMOLOGY:
For 1: After Hamlet, the prince of Denmark in Shakespeare's play Hamlet. The opening of Hamlet's soliloquy "To be, or not to be" is among the best-known lines in literature. Earliest documented use: 1903.
For 2: From Old French hamelet, diminutive of hamel (village), which itself is a diminutive of ham (village). Ultimately from the Indo-European root tkei- (to settle or dwell), which also gave us home, haunt, hangar, and site. Earliest documented use: 1330.

NOTES:
The idiom "Hamlet without the Prince" is used to refer to an event or a performance taking place without its main character. USAGE:
"With some he is a Hamlet, a divided man who is always questioning himself."
John S. Dunne; Time And Myth; University of Notre Dame Press; 2012.

"The Baroness was right on one point: he was a Hamlet; his soliloquy might have run, 'To be married or not to be married / That is the question.'"
Herbert Leibowitz; "Something Urgent I Have to Say to You": The Life and Works of William Carlos Williams; Farrar, Straus, and Giroux; 2011.
=======================================================

SHAMLET -
1) a Potemkin Village
2) Hamlet without the Prince

Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: A Word A Wednesday: HAMLET - 05/21/14 05:45 PM

HARMLET - (diminutive) a peccadillo that doesn't hurt anyone very much. Compare "tortle"
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: A Word A Wednesday: HAMLET - 05/22/14 07:16 AM
HARLET – A little joke.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc If y ou say so... - 05/22/14 02:20 PM

BARDOLPHIAN

PRONUNCIATION: (bar-DOL-fee-uhn)

MEANING: adjective: Having a red complexion, especially a red nose.

ETYMOLOGY: After Bardolph, a character in Shakespeare's Henry IV, Henry V, and The Merry Wives of Windsor, who was noted for his red nose. Earliest documented use: 1756. Another character from these plays who has become a word in English is Falstaff.

------------------------------------------

BARDOLPHIN - a lawyer with a white hat (to distinguish itself from the sharks)
Posted By: jenny jenny Word up Thuesday: BARDOLPHIAN. - 05/22/14 05:06 PM

Bardolphian

PRONUNCIATION: (bar-DOL-fee-uhn)
MEANING:
adjective: Having a red complexion, especially a red nose.
ETYMOLOGY:
After Bardolph, a character in Shakespeare's Henry IV, Henry V, and The Merry Wives of Windsor, who was noted for his red nose. Earliest documented use: 1756. Another character from these plays who has become a word in English is Falstaff.
=======================================================

BARDOLPHIN - a man who drinks like a fish
Posted By: wofahulicodoc BARDOLPHINSs of the world, unite!. - 05/22/14 05:23 PM

(Yours is much closer to the spirits of the original!)
Posted By: jenny jenny Re: BARDOLPHINSs of the world, unite!. - 05/22/14 06:00 PM
Originally Posted By: wofahulicodoc

(Yours is much closer to the spirits of the original!)


Ok, continuing the spirit of spirits...

BARDOLLPHIAN - a sexy woman who serves men drinks and teases them for big tips
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: BARDOLPHINSs of the world, unite!. - 05/22/14 09:18 PM
Originally Posted By: jenny jenny
Originally Posted By: wofahulicodoc

(Yours is much closer to the spirits of the original!)


Ok, continuing the spirit of spirits...

BARDOLLPHIAN - a sexy woman who serves men drinks and teases them for big tips


...in the City of Brotherly Love?
Posted By: jenny jenny Re: BARDOLPHINSs of the world, unite!. - 05/23/14 02:31 AM
Originally Posted By: wofahulicodoc
Originally Posted By: jenny jenny
Originally Posted By: wofahulicodoc

(Yours is much closer to the spirits of the original!)


Ok, continuing the spirit of spirits...

BARDOLLPHIAN - a sexy woman who serves men drinks and teases them for big tips


...in the City of Brotherly Love?


Get hip, Wolfman, today Philadelphia is the City of Bro' Love

Polonian

PRONUNCIATION:(po-LO-nee-uhn)
MEANING:
adjective:
1. Abounding in aphoristic expressions.
2. A native or inhabitant of Poland.

ETYMOLOGY:
For 1: After Polonius, a courtier and the father of Ophelia in Shakespeare's play Hamlet, known for his moralistic apothegms. Earliest documented use: 1847.
For 2: From Latin Polonia (Poland). Earliest documented use: 1533.
NOTES:
Some of Shakespeare's best-known quotations come out of Polonius's mouth. As his son Laertes heads for France, Polonius advises:

"Neither a borrower nor a lender be,
For loan oft loses both itself and friend."

"This above all: to thine own self be true,
And it must follow, as the night the day,
Thou canst not then be false to any man."

At another time, he says: "Brevity is the soul of wit."
As happens with quotations, some of his words have become simplified and sharpened with time, such as from the original "For the apparel oft proclaims the man." to "Clothes make the man."
USAGE:
"A few Polonian precepts can do something to indicate whether or not a scientist is cut out for collaboration."
P.B. Medawar; Advice To A Young Scientist; Harper and Row; 1980.
==============================================================

POOLONIAN - a press pool reporter whose reportal wit comes entirely from the book "Zippy Words of Awesome Cliches for the Dull".
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Hollywood rides high - 05/23/14 02:29 PM

POXONIAN- a curse on Magneto and Gandalf and the whole lot of 'em. Maybe Emperor Palpatine too, but that's another story.
Posted By: jenny jenny A word without a living example. - 05/24/14 01:47 AM


SOLONIAN [us] - what none of our current politicians are


shocked
Posted By: jenny jenny .MEMORIAL DAY: reprehend - 05/26/14 01:32 PM

reprehend

PRONUNCIATION (rep-ri-HEND)
MEANING:
verb tr.: To disapprove or to reprimand.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin reprehendere (to hold back, to censure), from re- (intensive) + prehendere (to seize). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ghend-/ghed- (to seize or to take), which is also the source of pry, prey, spree, reprise, surprise, pregnant, osprey, prison, get, impregnable, impresa, and prise. Earliest documented use: 1382.
USAGE:
"The false quotation was therefore one of those flashy worthless attempts at wit that I so much reprehend in others."
Patrick O'Brian; The Truelove; W.W. Norton; 1993.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Never cut what you can untie. -Joseph Joubert, essayist (1754-1824)
===========================================================

REPREHEN - to scold the chicken who ate the corn but didn't lay an egg. Scold her twice before she doesn't lay another egg because some chickens are dim-witted.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc MEMORIAL DAY: reprehend - 05/26/14 02:20 PM

PREPREHEND - the ultimate in Thought Police: scolding you for something before you even think of doing it...

(I'll be AFthisK for the next few days too - it's going to feel a bit strange but I'm sure you'll get along fine without me...)
Posted By: jenny jenny Re: MEMORIAL DAY: reprehend - 05/26/14 04:45 PM
Originally Posted By: wofahulicodoc

PREPREHEND - the ultimate in Thought Police: scolding you for something before you even think of doing it...

(I'll be AFthisK for the next few days too - it's going to feel a bit strange but I'm sure you'll get along fine without me...)


Yessir, WD, Your "PREPREHEND" will be a hard one to match.
And besides, I can amuse myself for a few days by trying to decipher "AFthisK". smile
Posted By: jenny jenny Do words have weight? GRAVITAS - 05/27/14 10:53 PM

gravitas

PRONUNCIATION: (GRAV-i-tas)
MEANING:
noun: Seriousness, dignity, or weightiness.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin gravis (serious). Earliest documented use: 1924.
USAGE:
"To some early critics, Mr. Büsser's playful choice lacked gravitas."
Victoria Gomelsky; Iconic Names for Iconic Watches; The New York Times; Feb 24, 2014.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
I cannot stress often enough that what science is all about is not proving things to be true but proving them to be false. -Lawrence M. Krauss, theoretical physicist (b. 1954)
----------------------------------------------------------

GRAVITASK - a chore of utmost import to mankind's understanding of everything i.e. since no one has ever seen a wave or a particle it is only by faith that we conceptualize the existence of matter.
Posted By: jenny jenny Wednesday: LANGUID - 05/28/14 12:44 PM
languid

PRONUNCIATION:(LANG-gwid)
MEANING:
adjective:
1. Lacking vigor or vitality.
2. Lacking interest.
3. Pleasantly lazy and calm.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin languere (to languish). Earliest documented use: 1595.
USAGE:
"Tahiti today is not the calm South Seas paradise depicted in Paul Gauguin's paintings of languid Polynesian women."
South Sea Bubble; The Economist (London, UK); Nov 11, 2004.

[See more usage examples of languid in Vocabulary.com's dictionary]

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Nothing is so firmly believed as what is least known. -Michel de Montaigne, essayist (1533-1592)
----------------------------------------------------

LANGUILD - a cult of lazy monks
Posted By: jenny jenny Re: Wednesday: LANGUID 2 - 05/28/14 07:31 PM

ELANGUID (ee LAN gwid) - the opposite of being languid
Posted By: jenny jenny Re: Wednesday: LANGUID 3 - 05/28/14 10:28 PM

LANGUIDE - the pleasant Polynesian girl who guides you to all the best bars on the island.
Posted By: jenny jenny Re: Wednesday: LANGUID 4 - 05/28/14 10:48 PM

SLANGUID - the overuse of slang words by a someone who thinks that he is hip, but what he really is, is lazy.
Posted By: jenny jenny Re: Wednesday: LANGUID 5 - 05/29/14 03:31 AM

ANGUID LIZARDS:
1) a small family of useful lizards that only eat slugs and bugs.
2) a human being with the same traits.
Posted By: jenny jenny Thursday's perusal : PERFUSE - 05/29/14 02:11 PM

perfuse

PRONUNCIATION: (puhr-FYOOZ)
MEANING:
verb tr.:
1. To spread over as a liquid, color, light, aroma, etc.
2. To force a liquid, such as blood, through an organ or tissue.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin perfundere (to drench), from per- (through) + fundere (to pour). Ultimately from the Indo-European root gheu- (to pour), which is also the source of funnel, font, fuse, diffuse, gust, gush, geyser, and infundibuliform. Earliest documented use: 1425.
USAGE:
"The heady aroma of strong coffee perfused the cozy kitchen."
Olivia Cunning; Hot Ticket; Sourcebooks; 2013.
__________________________________________________________

SERFUSE - items set aside for use by serfs only.
Examples: hoe, rake, shovel, etc.
Posted By: jenny jenny Re: Thursday's perusal : PERFUSE - 05/30/14 12:23 AM

HERFUSE - to hefuse means "NO"; to herfuse means "maybe".
Or vice versa.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc I'm b-a-a-a-ck!... - 05/30/14 01:57 AM

PELFUSE - how you spend your ill-gotten gains after a nefarious caper
PERFUS - what they'll do if they find us


PEROUSE - an episode of nocturia
Posted By: jenny jenny Re: I'm b-a-a-a-ck!... - 05/30/14 03:32 AM

Isn't that what Jack Nicholson said after axing the door?
Isn't that what Jack Nicholson said after axing the door?
Isn't that what Jack Nicholson said after axing the door?
Isn't that what Jack Nicholson said after axing the door?
Isn't that what Jack Nicholson said after axing the door?
Isn't that what Jack Nicholson said after axing the door?
Isn't that what Jack Nicholson said after axing the door?
Isn't that what Jack Nicholson said after axing the door?
Isn't that what Jack Nicholson said after axing the door?
Isn't that what Jack Nicholson said after axing the door?
Posted By: jenny jenny Good Word Friday: NOESIS - 05/30/14 02:11 PM
noesis

PRONUNCIATION:(no-EE-sis)
MEANING:
noun:
1. Cognition; perception.
2. The exercise of reason.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Greek noesis (thought), from noein (to think, to perceive), from nous (mind). Earliest documented use: 1881.
USAGE:
"The noesis of the fact that tigers roamed these areas since there were no boundaries, nor fences in this forest, didn't jab much at me."
Vishal Gupta; A Bittersweet Nostalgia; Strategic Book Publishing; 2012.
"In an attempt to recollect the former few days, flashes of noesis pervaded my concentration."
Jane E. Hill; So, Here I Stand; AuthorHouse; 2010.

[See more usage examples of noesis in Vocabulary.com's dictionary.]

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Trying to determine what is going on in the world by reading newspapers is like trying to tell the time by watching the second hand of a clock. -Ben Hecht, screenwriter, playwright, novelist, director, and producer.
=======================================================

KNOESIS - the perception that you know something when you don't
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Huis Clos - 05/30/14 07:49 PM

NOEXIS - the theme of a Sartrirical play

NOHESIS - the theme of an entire genre of Japanese play

NOASIS - We're never gonna get out of the desert alive!

NOMESIS - 1. an anti-nausea medicine; 2. my relative in Alaska

NOPESIS - refusing to go along with your sister (see also NOASIS)
Posted By: jenny jenny Huis Clos is cul de sac redux - 06/01/14 01:32 AM
MOESIS - the exercise of reason by The Three Stooges

Examples:

Curly: "I don't see a single cow. I don't even see a married one."

Moe: Let's do the Elevator Dance.
Curly: I don't know how.
Moe: Fathead! There are no steps.[slap]

Curly:(screaming) I CAN'T SEE! I CAN'T SEE!
Moe: Why can't you see, Fathead?
Curly: My eyes are shut.
Moe: [SLAP][SLAP][SLAP]
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Huis Clos is cul de sac redux - 06/01/14 02:13 AM
Nice one!

(I really miss the Like button sometimes)
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: Huis Clos is cul de sac redux - 06/01/14 03:19 AM
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Huis Clos is cul de sac redux - 06/01/14 03:16 PM

:-)
sulfurous or sulphurous

PRONUNCIATION: (SUHL-fuhr-uhs, suhl-FYOOR-uhs)
MEANING:
adjective:
1. Relating to or resembling sulfur.
2. Pale yellow.
3. Fiery; hellish.
4. Hot-tempered.
5. Profane, blasphemous.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin sulfur. Earliest documented use: 1530.
USAGE:
"And like a screeching harpy screaming up from the sulfurous depths of Hell, Kim Kardashian has sensed our happiness and seeks to destroy it..."

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
If Galileo had said in verse that the world moved, the inquisition might have let him alone. -Thomas Hardy, novelist and poet (1840-1928)
=========================================================

SULFURIOUS - to be mad as Hell at folks in Heaven.

SULFUROUT - Get those rotten eggs out of here !
catalyst

PRONUNCIATION: (KAT-uh-list)

MEANING:
noun
1. A substance that speeds up a chemical reaction without changing itself.
2. Someone or something that causes an event or change to happen.
ETYMOLOGY:
Via Latin, from Greek katalusis, from kataluein (to dissolve), from kata- (down) + luein (loosen). Ultimately from the Indo-European root leu- (to loosen, divide), which is also the source of forlorn, lag, loss, solve, analysis, and resolute. Earliest documented use: 1902.
USAGE:
"Doctoroff had seen how the Games served as a growth catalyst for host cities -- Tokyo expanded its subway system, Atlanta transformed its downtown."
Ken Auletta; After Bloomberg; The New Yorker; Aug 26, 2013.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
Follow your inner moonlight; don't hide the madness. -Allen Ginsberg said in his book "Madness Sells". (1926-1997)
--------------------------------------------------------

CAVALYST - a caver who instigates others to go down while he remains on top
Posted By: wofahulicodoc git along, little dogies - 06/04/14 02:13 AM

CATALOST - nobody can find my herd since they stampeded!
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: git along, little dogies - 06/04/14 06:49 PM

FULMINATE

PRONUNCIATION: (FUHL-muh-nayt, FOOL-, -mih-)

MEANING:
noun: An explosive salt of fulminic acid.
verb tr., intr.: 1. To explode or to cause to explode. 2. To issue denunciations.

---------------------------------

FULLINATE - this flower is completely fertilized; no more bees, please!

FULTINATE - the new ruler of Oman has a speech impediment and nobody dares to tell him


FULMINUTE - to fully experence every second of life by dancing barefoot on hot coals for a full minute. ()
Posted By: wofahulicodoc putting a different spin on it: Friday - 06/06/14 01:05 AM

ACIDIC

PRONUNCIATION: (uh-SID-ik)

MEANING: adjective:
1. Relating to or containing acid.
2. Having a sour or sharp taste.
3. Bitter or cutting (e.g. a remark).

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin acidus (sour), from acere (to be sour). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ak- (sharp), which is also the source of acrid, vinegar, acute, edge, hammer, heaven, eager, oxygen, and mediocre. Earliest documented use: 1868.

-------------------------

ACIDISC - a Frisbee painted with a psychedelic pattern; watching it spin after you throw it will disrupt your thought processes

ACIDICK - what you get when you cross a donkey with a white whale
LACIDIC - a tree imbued with a secretion of the female lac bug which when processed becomes shellac
Posted By: jenny jenny Final word of this week: BRIMSTONE - 06/06/14 11:51 PM
brimstone

PRONUNCIATION:(BRIM-stohn)

MEANING: noun:
1. Sulfur.
2. Fiery rhetoric, especially one filled with references to hell.
3. An ill-tempered, overbearing woman.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Old English brynstan, from brinnen (to burn) + stan (stone). Earliest documented use: 1300.

NOTES:
The Bible has many references to fire and brimstone pointing to burning in hell. Accordingly, the term "fire and brimstone" is used to refer to speech involving strong language, condemnation, damnation, etc., for example: a fire and brimstone preacher.

USAGE:
"One of the things that makes Alan Clark so compelling a writer is the whiff of brimstone that comes off him, what Mr Cornwell describes as his 'potential for evil'."
Old Nick Rides Again; The Economist (London, UK); Oct 1, 2009.

"Under all that fire and brimstone, you're an old softy at heart."
Michael Morpurgo; War Horse; Scholastic; 2010.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
The illusion which exalts us is dearer to us than ten thousand truths. -Aleksandr Pushkin, poet, novelist, playwright (1799-1837)
-----------------------------------------------------------

BRIMSTORE - place to go for the best prices on fire and brim
Posted By: wofahulicodoc better late than - 06/07/14 05:07 PM

BRIESTONE - a hunk of soft cheese that's been left unnoticed so long it turned rock hard
Posted By: jenny jenny Damn that Rimstone! - 06/07/14 11:12 PM


RIMSTONE - Rimstone dams form where there is some gradient, and hence flow, over the edge of a pool. Crystallization begins to occur at the air/water/rock interface. The turbulence caused by flow over the edge of the building dam may contribute to the outgassing or loss of carbon dioxide from water, and result in precipitation of mineral on this edge.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Damn that Rimstone! - 06/08/14 11:27 AM

Gee, I thought a RIMSTONE was the thing that deflected your golf ball just before it could fall into the cup...
Posted By: jenny jenny Re: Damn that Rimstone! - 06/08/14 12:18 PM
Originally Posted By: wofahulicodoc

Gee, I thought a RIMSTONE was the thing that deflected your golf ball just before it could fall into the cup...



smile rolling drum, cymbals clash... RIMSHOT! laugh
Posted By: Bazr Re: Mensopause III - 06/09/14 04:46 AM
ANTELOPE - to run off with your mother’s sister
Posted By: jenny jenny Monday's word to invigorate: DISPOSITIVE - 06/09/14 03:01 PM
dispositive

PRONUNCIATION:(dis-POZ-i-tiv)
MEANING:
adjective: Relating to or bringing about the settlement of a case.
ETYMOLOGY:
From dispose, from Old French disposer, from Latin disponere (to arrange), from dis- (apart) + ponere (to put). Ultimately from the Indo-European root apo- (off or away), which is also the source of pose, apposite, after, off, awkward, post, puny, apposite, and apropos. Earliest documented use: 1483.
USAGE:
"The Justice Department subsequently asked the National Academy of Sciences to re-examine the Dictabelt evidence and it concluded it was not dispositive, which naturally led to years of debate among forensic acoustic experts."
Ron Rosenbaum; Seeing Zapruder; Smithsonian (Washington, DC); Oct 2013.

"Marilyn Yalom supplements her summaries of love in French culture with lively, if hardly dispositive, anecdotes from her own encounters with France and the French.
How the French Invented Love; The New Yorker; Feb 4, 2013.
-------------------------------------------------------------

DISPOSILIVE - to resurrect a contention that was thought to be setttled

DISCPOSITIVE - a round flattened anode

DISPOSITIE - a diminutive used to diminish someone who disses your posit
Posted By: jenny jenny Wed wurd without wit: holograph - 06/10/14 06:02 AM
holograph

PRONUNCIATION: (HOL-uh-graf)
MEANING:
noun: 1. A document handwritten by its author.
adjective: 2 Handwritten by the author.
noun: 3. A hologram: a three-dimensional image created using laser.
ETYMOLOGY:
For 1, 2: Via Latin, from Greek holographos, from holos (whole) + -graphos (written). Earliest documented use: 1623.
For 3: From holography, which was coined from hologram on the pattern of photography, from Greek holos (whole). Earliest documented use: 1968
------------------------------------------------------------

SOLOGRAPH - a selfie taken without a partner
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Wed wurd without wit: holograph - 06/10/14 11:02 AM

HOLDGRAPH - The easel broke; you show the charts for my presentation
Posted By: Bazr starting with "holograph" - 06/10/14 11:25 AM
OLDGRAPH - a selfie taken many years ago.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc starting with "holograph" - 06/10/14 12:54 PM

HOLOGRAPE - the image of the source of fine beverages (makes non-alcoholic wine)
Posted By: Bazr Starting with holograph - 06/10/14 01:22 PM
HULAGRAPE - a fruit grown in Hawaii

HOLYGRAPH - a contrived hockey stick graph that end-of-worlders cite as gospel that seas are rising, Earth is burning, and earthlings can only be saved by buying carbon credits from governments.

***Bull Hockey!
And I have some ocean front property you can buy in Colorado.
***
Posted By: Bazr Start with plutarchy - 06/11/14 11:59 AM
PLUTARCHY

PRONUNCIATION:
(PLOO-tahr-kee)

MEANING:
noun: 1. Rule by the wealthy. 2. A wealthy ruling class.

ETYMOLOGY:
The Greek biographer Plutarch (c. 46-120 CE) has no connection with this word. Rather, it's Ploutos, the god of riches in Greek mythology. The word (and its synonym plutocracy and the word plutolatry) are derived from Greek pluto- (wealth) + archos (ruler), from arkhein (to rule). Earliest documented use: 1643.

USAGE:
"Boston's upper crust made sure that they had an unfair advantage over their less fortunate neighbors, an advantage intended to perpetuate plutarchy and a socially stratified society."
Keith Krawczynski; Daily Life in the Colonial City; Greenwood; 2012.
--------------------------------

PLUTOITCHY - a dog with flees.
Posted By: jenny jenny Re: Start with plutarchy - 06/11/14 02:57 PM

Hey Bazr, the established protocol of the plutoarchy here is to make a single letter change so as to effect another meaning. As in U to O as below...

PLOTARCHY - the plot of the anuarchy here to make this game more challenging and fun. smile

PLUS-ARCHY - government on the misguided principle that More is better


PLUTARCH - a historian, philosopher, poet, and member of the first Republican Tea Party of the First Century AD. (see qoute below)

The real destroyer of the liberties of the people is he who spreads among them bounties, donations and benefits.
--- Plutarch
Posted By: Tromboniator Won't stand for it - 06/11/14 08:51 PM
GLUTARCHY – Government by those who do nothing but sit.
Posted By: Bazr Re: Start with plutarchy - 06/11/14 08:54 PM
Originally Posted By: jenny jenny

Hey Bazr, the established protocol of the plutoarchy here is to make a single letter change so as to effect another meaning. As in U to O as below...

PLOTARCHY - the plot of the anuarchy here to make this game more challenging and fun. smile


Thanks Jenny Jenny. Learning as I go.
Posted By: Bazr Start at reproof - 06/12/14 11:06 AM
reproof

PRONUNCIATION:
(ri-PROOF)

MEANING:
noun: Disapproval; blame.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Old French reprover (to criticize), from Latin reprobare (to disapprove), from re- (opposite) + probare (to approve), from probus (good). Earliest documented use: 1375.

USAGE:
"The nuns have continued to insist on their right to debate and challenge church teaching, which has resulted in the Vatican's reproof."
Laurie Goodstein; Nuns Weigh Response to Scathing Vatican Rebuke; The New York Times; Jul 29, 2012.

-----------------------------------

RIPROOF - when your tent is damaged in a gale.
Posted By: jenny jenny Re: Start at reproof - 06/12/14 12:37 PM


Now Bazro, I don't mean you no reproof. But you'd best move out of that flimsy tent and get you a nice sturdy doublewide. Then when the next gale visits, you won't have to... (drop p)

REROOF - to put up a new roof where your old roof used to stay
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Start at reproof - 06/12/14 01:05 PM

REPROF - Tenure or no tenure, that guy is senile and has to go or there'll be no students at all
Posted By: jenny jenny Re: Start at reproof - 06/12/14 01:38 PM

RE POOF ! - to fail to blow out all the birthday candles on the first try and yet be given another chance
Posted By: Bazr Re: Mensopause III - 06/12/14 09:11 PM
REDROOF - I like that colour. It goes with my bloodshot eyes from watching the World Cup!!
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Mensopause III - 06/13/14 12:21 AM

PREPROOF - what it takes to convict you of preprehension (see 5/26/14, above)
Posted By: jenny jenny Re: Mensopause III - 06/13/14 03:30 AM
Originally Posted By: wofahulicodoc

PREPROOF - what it takes to convict you of preprehension (see 5/26/14, above)


Right on, Mister Wolfdoc, the term PREPROOF is a logical oxymoron; a contrived semantic construction used despairingly by those who practice pseudo science so as to preclude logical thought.

You know, like the Flat Earthers and Global Warmists. smile
Posted By: Bazr Re: Mensopause III - 06/13/14 07:00 AM
votary

PRONUNCIATION:
(VOH-tuh-ree)

MEANING:
noun: 1. One who is devoted to an activity, person, institution, etc.
noun: 2. One who has taken vows to a religion, such as a monk or nun.
adjective: Bound by a vow or relating to a vow.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin votum (vow), from vovere (to vow), which also gave us vow, vote, and devote. Earliest documented use: 1546.

USAGE:
"The issue has been a matter of debate with strong votaries on both sides."
Road to Basel; Financial Express (New Delhi, India); May 4, 2012.

-------------------------

LOTARY - a game of chance where even the word is dodgy.
Posted By: jenny jenny Re: Mensopause III - 06/13/14 05:06 PM

VOLTARY noun

1) Voltaire's private library
2) electric chair
3) eclectic chair
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Mensopause III - 06/13/14 07:32 PM

VOBARY - Spoonerized middle-class French woman with doomed upper-class aspirations, from a novel by Flaubert
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: Mensopause III - 06/13/14 09:00 PM
Surely Blaufert.
Posted By: Bazr Re: Mensopause III - 06/14/14 12:57 AM


YOTARY - a place where you can park your yacht in silence.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Mensopause III - 06/14/14 01:47 AM
Originally Posted By: Tromboniator
Surely Blaufert.

Yes. Him, too.
Posted By: jenny jenny Re: Mensopause III - 06/14/14 04:29 AM

VOTARDY - to stagger out of the bar after the polls are closed
Posted By: Bazr Re: Mensopause III - 06/14/14 07:07 AM
VATARY - a wine cellar
Posted By: Bazr start with camarilla - 06/16/14 09:06 AM
camarilla

PRONUNCIATION:
(kam-uh-RIL-uh, Spanish: kah-mah-REE-yah)

MEANING:
noun: A group of confidential scheming advisers.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Spanish, diminutive of cámara (chamber), from Latin camera (room), from Greek kamara (an object with an arched cover). Earliest documented use: 1839.

USAGE:
"In China ... successions to a bureaucratic collective leadership are managed by a tiny camarilla in a self-declared one-party state."
Simon Sebag Montefiore; In Russia, Power Has No Heirs; The New York Times; Jan 11, 2009.

-----------------------------------------------------

FAMARILLA - A group of family scheming advisers.
Posted By: jenny jenny Re: start with camarilla - 06/16/14 02:40 PM
HAMARILLA - a scheming Southern gorilla armed with a hammer
Posted By: wofahulicodoc a camerilla takes gigapixel photos - 06/16/14 03:49 PM

CAMAROLLA - a sporty powerful compact car soon to be marketed by the new Chevrolet/Toyota conglomerate
Posted By: jenny jenny Re: a camerilla takes gigapixel photos - 06/16/14 10:49 PM
Originally Posted By: wofahulicodoc

CAMAROLLA - a sporty powerful compact car soon to be marketed by the new Chevrolet/Toyota conglomerate


Good one, wofahuli. Copyright the name, could happen. (c) smile

SCAMARILLA - carbon credits
Posted By: Bazr start at fandango - 06/17/14 07:42 AM
fandango

PRONUNCIATION:
(fan-DANG-go)

MEANING:
noun:
1. A lively Spanish dance in triple time.
2. A piece of music for this dance.
3. A foolish or silly behavior, act, or thing.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Spanish, of uncertain origin. Earliest documented use: 1766.

USAGE:
"Going through this ridiculous fandango of chicken and blackmail again is the height of irresponsibility."
Norman Ornstein; Extending Debt Limit Past Elections is Right Path; Roll Call (Washington, DC); Jul 27, 2011.

--------------------------------

MANDANGO - Fugitive on the run (man-DANG-go)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: start at fandango - 06/17/14 01:08 PM

FANDANGLO - Whitey struck out!

FANTANGO - a suggestive performance done to the music of a different Spanish dance. It takes two to do it.
Posted By: jenny jenny fandango - 06/17/14 01:36 PM

F and and O - mnemonic for spelling foo; as in egg foo yong
Posted By: jenny jenny PUNGLE me...now! - 06/18/14 04:32 AM

pungle

PRONUNCIATION:(PUNG-uhl)
MEANING:
verb tr.: To make a payment; to shell out.
ETYMOLOGY:
Alteration of Spanish póngale (put it down), from poner (to put), from Latin ponere (to put). Ultimately from the Indo-European root apo- (off or away) that is also the source of after, off, awkward, post, puny, apposite, apropos, and dispositive. Earliest documented use: 1851.
USAGE:
"Congress pungled up $700 billion for a bailout."
Steve Rubenstein; 2008 in Review; San Francisco Chronicle; Dec 30, 2008.
---------------------------------------------------

UNGLE - an ugly uncle
Posted By: Bazr Re: PUNGLE me...now! - 06/18/14 09:00 AM
PUHGLE - a dog that is constipated

PUNGLEE - The Joy of Paranomasia
Posted By: Bazr start at picaroon and go boldly - 06/19/14 07:56 AM
picaroon

PRONUNCIATION:
(pik-uh-ROON)

MEANING:
noun: 1. A rogue, thief, or pirate. 2. A pirate ship.
verb intr.: To act as a pirate.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Spanish picarón (scoundrel), from picaro (rogue). Earliest documented use: 1624.

USAGE:
"I don't like bank stocks or banksters -- especially the big-city picaroons who have less conscience than a fox in a henhouse."
Malcolm Berko; Some OK Banksters and a Primer on Scripophily; Creators Syndicate (Los Angeles); Dec 14, 2011.

--------------------------------------------------

PICAMOON - a Trekker deciding on a destination
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: start at picaroon and go boldly - 06/19/14 11:08 AM

PICARDON - the starship captain's been around for so long they call him a dinosaur
Posted By: Bazr looking for a place to stay - 06/19/14 11:21 AM
PICAROOM - new concept in finding accommodation
Posted By: jenny jenny picaroon BOLDLY - 06/19/14 01:21 PM
PICARTOON - a cartoon based on the kitschy book
The Life of PI
Posted By: Bazr start at arroyo - 06/20/14 11:51 AM
arroyo

PRONUNCIATION:
(uh-ROI-oh)

MEANING:
noun: A narrow, steep-sided watercourse, usually dry except after rain.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Spanish arroyo, from Latin arrugia (mine shaft). Earliest documented use: 1845.

USAGE:
"A wooden bridge took us across an arroyo and into a grassy area."
Gene Sager; In Touch With Nature; Natural Life (Toronto, Canada); Jan/Feb 2014.

-----------------------------------------------

ARBOYO - the opposite to ARGIRLO
Posted By: jenny jenny ARROYO - 06/20/14 08:10 PM

ARROW-O - an arrow designed to circle back to the archer if the target is missed.

Posted By: Bazr Re: ARROYO - 06/21/14 12:08 AM
Originally Posted By: jenny jenny

ARROW-O - an arrow designed to circle back to the archer if the target is missed.



suicide arrows??
Posted By: Bazr Re: ARROYO - 06/21/14 12:19 AM
ARTOYO - the Japanese version of 'Toy Story'
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: ARROYO - 06/21/14 03:24 AM

ARROJO - Redbeard the Pirate, Scourge of the Spanish Main
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: ARROYO - 06/21/14 03:26 AM

Originally Posted By: Bazr
ARTOYO - the Japanese version of 'Toy Story'

...you sure you don't mean the Droid in the Japanese version of 'Star Wars' ?
Posted By: jenny jenny Re: ARROYO - 06/21/14 05:31 AM

AFROYO - a yo for a bro with a afro.
Posted By: Bazr Re: ARROYO - 06/21/14 05:48 AM
Originally Posted By: jenny jenny

AFROYO - a yo for a bro with a afro.


very creative jen
Posted By: Bazr Re: ARROYO - 06/21/14 05:52 AM
BRROYO it's cold out there.....!!!

squirrelly or squirrely

PRONUNCIATION: (SKWUR-uh-lee)

MEANING:
adjective: 1. Restless, jumpy, nervy. 2. Odd or crazy.

ETYMOLOGY:

Why do we consider a squirrel squirrelly? Well, it's either their unpredictable running around or we think they are nutty because of their preference for nuts. The word came to us via French and Latin from Greek skiouros (shadow-tailed), from skia (shadow) + oura (tail). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ors- (buttocks) which also gave us ass, dodo, and cynosure. Earliest documented use: 1925.

USAGE:
"'It's indicative of how squirrelly the market is,' Christopher Dixo said, adding that investors are skittish about any degree of negative news."
Sallie Hofmeister; Diller's Internet Empire Takes a Hit; Los Angeles Times; Jan 7, 2003.

--------------------------------------------------------


SQUIRELY - to act in a manor in the manner of a squire
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Rocky Road - 06/23/14 08:06 PM
(...says Bullwinkle)

SQUIRBELLY - Sancho Panza's tummy

SQUARRELLY - it leads to arguments
Posted By: Bazr a bit tinny - 06/24/14 07:21 AM
canaille

PRONUNCIATION:
(kuh-NAYL, -NY)

MEANING:
noun: The common people; the masses; riffraff.

ETYMOLOGY:
From French canaille (villain, rabble), from Italian canaglia (pack of dogs, rabble), from cane (dog), from Latin canis (dog). Ultimately from the Indo-European root kwon- (dog), which is also the source of canine, chenille (from French chenille: caterpillar, literally, little dog), kennel, canary, hound, dachshund, corgi, cynic, and cynosure. Earliest documented use: 1676.

USAGE:
"The gang in the alley was not canaille; fine gentlemen from the court were raging here."
Isak Dinesen; Last Tales; Random House; 1957.


-----------------------------------------------------

CANVILLE - a town where tin cans live in harmony with each other.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: a bit tinny - 06/24/14 10:49 AM

CANAISLE - where you find the soup

CANALLE - DeutcheBank just fired their entire staff

CANAIDLE - nobody in the Loo just now

CAN'TILLE - the little red engine that couldn't.
Posted By: Bazr tightwad - 06/25/14 08:27 AM
monkeyshine

PRONUNCIATION:
(MUNG-kee-shyn)

MEANING:
noun: A trick, prank, or antic.

ETYMOLOGY:
After monkey + shine (a caper). A similar term is monkey business. Earliest documented use: 1832.

USAGE:
"Senator Fritz Hollings opened in his usual direct fashion: Let's cut out the monkeyshines and get down to business."
Mary McGrory; Amtrak Melodrama; The Washington Post; Jun 30, 2002.

-------------------------------------

MONEYSHINE - when you hold cash in your wallet for too long you get this..
Posted By: jenny jenny A jug of MONKEYSHINE - 06/25/14 01:51 PM


HONKEYSHINE - white lightning
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: A jug of MONKEYSHINE - 06/25/14 04:41 PM

MOONKEYSHINE - what you use to get into the still when it's locked

Posted By: wofahulicodoc not to mention... - 06/25/14 04:43 PM

MONKEYSLINE - what Curious George Flies a Kite with
Posted By: jenny jenny Come. Let us mention... - 06/26/14 04:44 AM

DONKEYSHINE - not often, but occasionally, domesticated donkeys do shine.
Posted By: Bazr movement - 06/26/14 09:51 AM
puce

PRONUNCIATION:
(pyoos)

MEANING:
noun: A dark red or brownish purple color.
adjective: Of this color.

ETYMOLOGY:
From French puce (flea), from Latin pulex (flea). Earliest documented use: 1778. Other terms coined after the flea are flea market, a direct translation of French marché aux puces and ukulele (from Hawaiian, literally leaping flea, perhaps from the rapid motion of the fingers in playing it).

USAGE:
"An increasingly puce Mr Farage complained about Britain's loss of sovereignty."
The Third Man; The Economist (London, UK); Mar 29, 2014.

------------------------------------------------------

PUICE - prune juice

"...The lady who dyes a chemical yellow, or stains her grey hair puce..."
-- (crossthreading to Snippets of Culture)



But back to the matter at hand -

peuce - a very low card (although sometimes wild), afflicted upon dyslexic poker players
Posted By: jenny jenny Let the pun fit the crime.... - 06/26/14 01:31 PM

PUCER - an affectionate affectation for a soccer goaltender who jumps about like a flea

(in Mexico he is called "bean").
Posted By: Bazr shiftworker - 06/27/14 08:20 AM
toady

PRONUNCIATION:
(TOH-dee)

MEANING:
noun: A person who flatters or tries to please someone to gain favor.
verb intr.: To behave as a toady.

ETYMOLOGY:
From shortening of toad-eater. In times past, a quack employed an assistant who ate (or pretended to eat) a poisonous toad and was supposedly cured by the quack's medicine. From there the word extended to a person who would do anything to curry favor. Earliest documented use: 1827.

USAGE:
"Klein and the rest of Mission Control want a bunch of yes men and toadies."
Martin Shoemaker; Murder on the Aldrin Express; Analog Science Fiction & Fact (New York); Sep 2013.

-----------------------------------------------------------

LOADY - someone who packs or unpacks goods.
Posted By: jenny jenny A hot toddy for toadies - 06/27/14 02:51 PM

TODDY -

(1) A mixed drink made of liquor and water with sugar and spices served hot
(2) a hot lady served by sniveling male escorts who are not

TODADY - where my heart belongs

TWOADY - how a lot of pills are taken
Posted By: jenny jenny Sweet Tea - 06/27/14 09:39 PM


TEADY - a tea Party adherent i.e. our last hope against iron fisted rule by ignoble government tyrants. frown
Posted By: Bazr fading away - 06/28/14 02:37 AM
TOFADY - things are starting to get a bit blurry.
Posted By: Bazr watch out !! - 06/30/14 08:49 AM
mossback

PRONUNCIATION:
(MOS-bak)

MEANING:
noun: A very old-fashioned person or one holding extremely conservative views.

ETYMOLOGY:
From the idea that someone is old enough to have moss grow on his back. Old aquatic animals, such as turtles, do develop mosslike growth on their backs. Earliest documented use: 1865.

USAGE:
"Here, Markowitz deals with ... moldy old mossbacks in English departments who won't teach writing by women."
Miriam Markowitz; Here Comes Everybody; The Nation (New York); Dec 9, 2013.

-----------------------------------------------------------

BOSSBACK - workers are on the alert when he returns.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: watch out !! - 06/30/14 12:58 PM

MOSESBACK - what never saw the Promised Land

MOSSBARK - the north side of a tree
Posted By: jenny jenny Ninty-nine percent of Soccer... - 06/30/14 01:59 PM


TOSSBACK - the endless act of passing the ball to another team player because of your inner fear of missing the goal


USA USA USA USA USA USA USA
Posted By: Tromboniator Up against the Wall St. - 07/01/14 05:46 AM
MOSTBACK – an unbeatable investment.
Posted By: Bazr age might matter - 07/01/14 07:49 AM
misanthrope

PRONUNCIATION:
(MIS-uhn-throp, MIZ-)

MEANING:
noun: One who dislikes people in general.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Greek misanthropos, from misos (hatred) + anthropos (man). Earliest documented use: 1683.

USAGE:
"Consider both an avid cocktail party hostess with hundreds of acquaintances and a grumpy misanthrope, who may have one or two friends."
Infectious Personalities; The Economist (London, UK); May 12, 2010.

-----------------------------------------------------

MIDANTHROPE - One who dislikes people who are middle aged.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: age might matter - 07/01/14 12:18 PM

MISCANTHROPE - one who likes all kinds of unspecified people
Posted By: jenny jenny Today's misanthropic uplift - 07/01/14 01:00 PM

MISANTHOPE - having hate for the sin while retaining hope for the sinner
Posted By: Bazr grumpy - 07/02/14 08:06 AM
bon vivant

PRONUNCIATION:
(BAHN vee-VAHNT, BON* vee-VAN*)
[* these syllables are nasal]


MEANING:
noun: One who enjoys good things in life, especially good food and drink.

ETYMOLOGY:
From French, from bon (good) + vivant (a person living), from vivre (to live). Earliest documented use: 1695.

-------------------------------------------------------------

NON VIVANT - one who doesn't enjoy anything.
Posted By: jenny jenny For snob effect use your nasals - 07/02/14 02:44 PM

BON VIVAINT

Pronunciation:

(BAHN vee-VIHNT, BON* vee-VYAN*)
[* these syllables are nasal]

1) a happy non-human
2) a party animal
3) a good human being who is now dead
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: For snob effect use your nasals - 07/02/14 07:01 PM

CON VIVANT - jailhouse slang for a life sentence

AUTODIDACT

PRONUNCIATION:(ah-to-DY-dakt)

MEANING: noun: A self-taught person.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Greek autodidaktos (self-taught), from autos (self) + didaktos (taught). Earliest documented use: 1534.

USAGE:
"Tom didn't do particularly well in school because of problems with attention disorder, hyperactivity, and even a streak of mischievousness. Instead, he became an autodidact, using his intense interest in reading to educate himself."
Sharon Salyer; He Was the Love of Her Life; The Herald (Everett, Washington); May 7, 2014.
_________________________________________________

NUTODIDACT - a nut-o self-taught.

AUTODODECT - a twelve-wheeled car
ALTODIDACT – someone educated in the art of getting high.

AUTODIDDAT - what to tell the cops after your car crashes into a liquor store.
Posted By: Bazr a dog's life - 07/04/14 07:21 AM
magnifico

PRONUNCIATION:
(mag-NIF-i-ko)

MEANING:
noun: A person of high rank or position.

ETYMOLOGY:
Earlier magnifico was an honorary title applied to Venetian noblemen. From Italian magnifico (magnificent), from Latin magnus (great). Ultimately from the Indo-European root meg- (great), which is also the source of magnificent, maharajah, master, mayor, maestro, magnate, magistrate, maximum, magnify, mickle, mahatma, magnanimous, and hermetic. Earliest documented use: 1573.

USAGE:
"All the magnificos emerge looking banally ordinary."
Peter Schjeldahl; Beasts: The Art World; The New Yorker; May 17, 2010.

--------------------------------------------------------------

MAGNIFIDO - A pampered dog.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: a dog's life - 07/04/14 03:32 PM

MAGNIFICIO - Big Labor

NAGNIFICO - Seabiscuit

MUGNIFICO - one handsome dude

and, stepping outsite the Roolz briefly -
MAGNIFIASCO - (plenty of eligibles; you pick it!)
Posted By: jenny jenny Because THEY are THEM and we are wee. - 07/04/14 06:34 PM

MAGNIFICA -

(1) government doublespeak for the " Federal Insurance Contributions Act" which is not a contribution but a tax on all American workers (Federal government employees exempted) .

(2) any scam of a similiar magnitude.
Guaranteed Effective All-Occasion Non-Slanderous Political Smear Speech" from Mad magazine (WebCite). It has gems such as:

"His female relatives put on a constant pose of purity and innocence, and claim they are inscrutable, yet every one of them has taken part in hortatory activities."

Well, election season is coming up and so we give you a fresh set of words to help you write your own non-slanderous smear speech. Even if you don't plan on contesting an election, why not sprinkle these words in your office memos, research reports, or term papers?

This week we'll see five words that sound dirty, but aren't.

hortatory*

PRONUNCIATION:(HOR-tuh-tor-ee)
MEANING: adjective: Strongly urging.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin hortari (to urge). Ultimately from the Indo-European root gher- (to like or want), which also gave us yearn, charisma, greedy, and exhort. Earliest documented use: 1586.

USAGE:"Of course, the book has its morals, just not hortatory ones."
More Than Just a Phunny Phellow; The Economist (London, UK); Apr 15, 2010.

"There are hortatory slogans painted along the architrave."
Will Self; Real Meals; New Statesman (London, UK); Oct 25, 2013.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
It is a truism that almost any sect, cult, or religion will legislate its creed into law if it acquires the political power to do so. -Robert A. Heinlein, science-fiction author (1907-1988)
______________________________________________________

HORTATOR - a whore; nice to visit but chancy to marry.
Posted By: Bazr holiday mode - 07/07/14 07:40 AM
HOTATORY - someplace warm where you get the urge to vacation.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: holiday mode - 07/08/14 01:09 AM

SHORTATORY - a financial strategy based on the conviction that the fortunes of the Conservatives are on the decline

AORATORY - a cherished grade in Public Speaking class (No thanks, no tea today)


Did you see that sign that said

. . . . . . . . . IN THIS LABORATORY
. . . . USE MORE OF THE FIRST FIVE LETTERS
. . . . . . . AND LESS OF THE LAST SEVEN
Posted By: Bazr f troop - 07/08/14 01:39 AM
FORTATORY - a place where the US Army hang out and wait for Indians to attack.
Posted By: Bazr single - 07/08/14 06:12 AM
formicate

PRONUNCIATION:
(FOR-mi-kayt)

MEANING:
verb intr.:
1. To crawl like ants.
2. To swarm with ants.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin formicare (to crawl like ants), from formica (ant). Earliest documented use: 1854.

USAGE:
"Again, again, again, until you reach the inevitable conclusion of sky-rises, nuclear submarines, orbiting satellites, and Homo sapiens formicating the Earth."
Laird Barron; Shiva, Open Your Eye; Fantasy & Science Fiction (Cornwall, Connecticut); Sep 2001.

______________________________________________________

FORMIDATE: - a new website for meeting a new flame.
Posted By: jenny jenny FORMICATE on Tuesday - 07/08/14 01:37 PM

FORMICATER - a person with perverted formical interests e.g. E.O. WILSON
Posted By: wofahulicodoc extravag-ant - 07/08/14 06:29 PM

FORMIHATE - 1040

FORMICASTE - the Buggers (see Ender's Game and its sequels and prequels)

FORMICARE - a new product to clean your kitchen counters
Posted By: jenny jenny Re: extravag-ant - 07/08/14 07:40 PM

DORMICATE - to stash forbidden objects in the college dorm. Examples: beer and chicks, chicks and beer, beer and sheep, etc.
Posted By: Bazr wiggle - 07/08/14 11:00 PM
WORMICATE - to squirm like worms
Posted By: Bazr big voices - 07/09/14 07:31 AM
assonance

PRONUNCIATION:
(AS-uh-nuhns)

MEANING:
noun: The use of words with same or similar vowel sounds but with different end consonants.
Example: The o sounds in Wordsworth's "A host, of golden daffodils."

ETYMOLOGY:
Via French, from Latin ad- (to) + sonare (to sound), from sonus (sound). Ultimately from the Indo-European root swen- (to sound), which also gave us sound, sonic, sonnet, sonata, and unison. Earliest documented use: 1728.

USAGE:
"The passage offers many beauties: the nearly incantatory repetition, the assonance (define and confine, streets and treat, space and faces), the homophones (rains and reins -- but not reigns?), the pun (no sign of motorway)."
Kevin Dettmar; Less Is Morrissey; The Chronicle of Higher Education (Washington, DC); Dec 9, 2013.

__________________________________________________________

BASSONANCE - people who speak very loudly


ASSONUANCE
ASS uh noo on(t)s

1) any word that suggests another meaning (usually vulgar)
2) the use of the word "assonance" in polite society when followed by a giggle.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Sounds good to me - 07/09/14 06:32 PM

ASSODANCE - 1. what the little bubbles do at the surface of a glass of Coca-Cola
2. Freshman college mixer run by Charlie Chan

ASSONANCHE - the entire herd of donkeys lost their footing and fell roly-poly pell-mell tumble-bumble down the mountainside

ASSONACE - What's the highest card in any suit?
Posted By: Bazr start with inspissate - 07/10/14 04:54 AM
inspissate

PRONUNCIATION:
(in-SPIS-ayt)

MEANING:
verb tr., intr.: To thicken or condense.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin inspissare (to thicken), from spissus (thick). Earliest documented use: 1603.

USAGE:
"These are flavors that have been inspissating in some timeless tandoor for hours, days -- decades."
Brad Leithauser; And an Outpost on Rodeo Drive; The New York Times; Mar 5, 1995.

______________________________________________________

GINSPISSATE - an alcoholic drink that makes you go and then you feel hungry.

INSWISSATE - gorged myself at the Lindt/Sprüngli store

INSPISSAUTÉ - first you lant it, then you cook it in a small amount of fat over high heat so it "jumps" above the surface of the pan

INSPISSTATE - piss-poor government

(INSPISSATE is a fairly common word in medicine, btw. Fluids that are inspissated are thick and viscous and generally not a good thing to find or to have. If they're lung secretions, for example, they're hard to cough up, and difficult to penetrate with antibiotics. It's pronounced "IN-spi-sate" in this context.)

KINSPISSATE-family gathering where the more the drink is
grogged, the thicker the tongue becomes

INSPISSTATE - a short state in height but thick in the middle like Tennessee and unlike the three states under it which are narrow states, Georgia, Alabama, and the one that is hard to spell...ISSPPISSATE smile
Posted By: Bazr Re: start with inspissate - 07/10/14 11:49 PM
SINPISSATE - an establishment of drunken debauchery and filth.

debauchery - I love this word, not because of it's meaning, I just love saying it!!!
Posted By: Bazr start with cocker - 07/11/14 09:24 AM
cocker

PRONUNCIATION:
(KAHK-uhr)

MEANING:
verb tr.: To pamper or spoil.
noun: A breed of small spaniel dog.

ETYMOLOGY:
For verb: Of obscure origin. Earliest documented use: 1499.
For noun: From the use of such dogs in hunting of birds such as woodcock. Earliest documented use: 1811.

USAGE:
"Parents, by humouring and cockering them when little, corrupt the principles of nature in their children, and wonder afterwards to taste the bitter waters, when they themselves have poisoned the fountain."
John Locke (1632-1704).

______________________________________________________________

CONKER- impact to the head gives you one.
Posted By: Bazr Re: start with cocker - 07/11/14 10:13 AM
JOCKER - someone who does their morning run in their underpants.

COCKEE- a cocky young man who is not very good at being cocky.
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: start with cocker - 07/11/14 03:54 PM
Originally Posted By: Bazr
JOCKER - someone who does their morning run in their underpants.


CODKER or just a codpiece
Posted By: Bazr Re: start with cocker - 07/11/14 10:42 PM
COPKER - a policeman who monitors the safety of codpieces.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Sweet Molly Malone - 07/12/14 02:21 AM

COCKLER - she sells sea shells by the seashore

In Dublin, no less,
CROCKER - any cheerful, wholesome, rosy-cheeked, full bodied woman who excels in baking cakes, pies, and in pleasing her man in artfull ways... whose first name happens to be "Betty". smile
Posted By: Bazr start with vizard - 07/14/14 05:41 AM
vizard or visard

PRONUNCIATION:
(VIZ-uhrd)

MEANING:
noun: A visor, mask, or disguise.

ETYMOLOGY:
A variant of visor, from Anglo-French viser, from vis (face), from visus (sight), from videre (to see). Ultimately from the Indo-European root weid- (to see), which is also the source of guide, wise, vision, advice, idea, story, history, previse, polyhistor, invidious, hades, eidos, and eidetic. Earliest documented use: 1555.

USAGE:
"The birds wear floor-length costumes, and Princess Victoria actually comes from the Veneto, bearing a vizard (the beaked plague-doctor's mask)."
The ABC of Fabulous Princesses; Kirkus Reviews (New York); Dec 15, 2013.

------------------------------------------------------------

VIZCARD - like a visa but you can swipe it to get in and out of countries.
Posted By: jenny jenny A VIZARD EXPOSED! - 07/14/14 02:23 PM

VIZART - Pop Art disguised and contrived as True Art.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc It's all in how you pronounce it - 07/14/14 10:42 PM

VISAID -
1) snake oil peddled as a way to let you see better without needing glasses
2) additional identification with your picture on it to prove you are the rightful owner of a credit or debit card
3) reply to the question, "What did you say was the Roman numeral for five? I couldn't hear you."
Posted By: jenny jenny GROGRAM respelled again - 07/15/14 08:42 AM
grogram

PRONUNCIATION: (GROG-ruhm)

MEANING:
noun: A coarse fabric of silk, combined with mohair or wool, and often stiffened with gum.
ETYMOLOGY:
From French gros grain (large or coarse grain). Another fabric from the same origin is grosgrain. Earliest documented use: 1562.
USAGE:
"Instead of putting her still-thick, white hair into its usual twist, she'd tied it back at the nape of her neck with a black, grogram ribbon."
Nancy Desrosiers; Stay a Little Longer; Tate Publishing; 2011.
____________________________________________________________

GROGRUM - an iteration expressing good rum-rum
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: GROGRAM respelled again - 07/15/14 10:37 PM

GYROGRAM - a high-tech way (three generations ago, anyway) of ordering a sandwich from the Greek restaurant
Posted By: Bazr shaky business - 07/15/14 11:00 PM
GEOGRAM - a machine that helps map the geography of the earth to establish
faults where volcanic activity and earthquakes may occur.
Posted By: Bazr start with secretory - 07/16/14 09:52 AM
secretory

PRONUNCIATION:
(si-KREE-tuh-ree)

MEANING:
adjective: Relating to the release of a substance from a cell, gland, or an organ.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin secernere (to distinguish), from se- (apart) + cernere (to sift). Ultimately from the Indo-European root krei- (to sift or to discriminate), which also gave us crime, crisis, certain, excrement, secret, critic, garble, hypocrisy, and diacritical. Earliest documented use: 1692.

USAGE:
"The secret behind such organised societies is communication through the use of around 20 pheromones, emitted by ants' secretory organs."
Wisdom of Crowds; The Economist (London, UK); Apr 8, 2009.

________________________________________________________________

SEGRETORY - someone who is isolated from everyone else.
Posted By: jenny jenny SECRETORY BUGMEN - 07/16/14 12:47 PM
SECRESTORY - entomoligists have known for a long time that ants talked in smells but thought it best not to tell anybody.

EXAMPLE:
"The secret behind such organised societies is communication through the use of around 20 pheromones, emitted by ants' secretory organs."
Wisdom of Crowds; The Economist (London, UK); Apr 8, 2009.

Posted By: wofahulicodoc Mon Dieu! - 07/16/14 10:47 PM

SACRETORY - a Conservative French Cardinal
Posted By: wofahulicodoc appropriate for "Mensopause" - 07/17/14 06:53 PM

FACTITIOUS

PRONUNCIATION: (fak-TISH-uhs)

MEANING: adjective:
1. Artificial
2. Sham

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin facticius (artificial), past participle of facere (to do). Earliest documented use: 1646.

-------------------------

FACTRITIOUS - full of objective truths, thereby nourishng the mind

FACETITIOUS - describing a gem cut into many small smooth sides, to enhance internal reflectivity and increase sparkle

-------------------------


Hmm... first inspissated, then secretory, now factitious - could be subtitled "Another thread of Words from Medicine" laugh
Posted By: wofahulicodoc a prose poem - 07/18/14 12:58 PM
PROEM

PRONUNCIATION: (PRO-uhm, -em)

MEANING: noun: An introduction, preface, or preamble.

ETYMOLOGY: From Old French proeme, from Latin prooemium, from Greek prooimion, from pro- (before) + oime (song). Earliest documented use: 1410.

--------------------------------

PROLEM - what an alcoholic has (see VOTARDY, above)

PROXEM - singular of PROXI

BROEM - a Dutch besom

PRO-REM - that new sleeping medicine
Posted By: jenny jenny A PROEM for a POEM - 07/18/14 09:22 PM

PHOEM (FOE-em ) -
1) a home phone not a cell phone
2) anything archaic
Posted By: wofahulicodoc put the oar in the thole - 07/19/14 01:47 AM

ROEM - what you do to shells, sculls, and wherries
Posted By: Bazr yoga - 07/19/14 07:05 AM
PREOM - what you do before you start meditating.
Posted By: jenny jenny The last word - 07/19/14 09:56 PM


P-ROOM - a private room
Posted By: wofahulicodoc quoth the urologist - 07/20/14 02:07 AM

Originally Posted By: jenny jenny
P-ROOM - a private room

...that would be a private bathroom ?
Posted By: jenny jenny Re: quoth the urologist - 07/20/14 12:31 PM
Maybe. But it also was supposed to be THE LAST WORD frown
Posted By: wofahulicodoc post-proximate word - 07/21/14 11:22 AM

Quote without comment:
From Anu's weekly newsletter -
[qupte] From: Peirce Hammond (peirceiii yahoo.com)
Subject: Proem

There is a little known category of words that get confused with the words that get confused with well known words. So today's word, proem is readily confused with poem. But consider the word preom,[E.A.] easily taken to be a typo when one surely intended to write proem. That, however, would be an error when one was referring to the technique of rapid free association to clear one's mind just prior to meditation -- preom.
Peirce Hammond, Bethesda, Maryland [/quote]
Bohemian

PRONUNCIATION: (bo-HEE-mee-uhn)

MEANING:
adjective:
1. Relating to Bohemia, its people, or languages.
2. Living an unconventional life.
3. Leading a wandering life.

noun:
1. A person (such as a writer or an artist) who lives an unconventional life.
2. A vagabond or wanderer.
3. A native or inhabitant of Bohemia.
4. The Czech dialects spoken in Bohemia.

ETYMOLOGY:
From French bohémien (Gypsy, vagabond), because Gypsies were believed to come from Bohemia or entered through Bohemia. Bohemia is a region in central Europe, now a part of the Czech Republic. Earliest documented use: 1579.
--------------------------------------------------------

BOHERMIAN - a hippie chick

BOHEMAN – A rugged guy named Derek.
Posted By: Bazr crowd control - 07/21/14 11:42 PM
BOHEMANIA - when everybody goes crazy over Derek.
Posted By: jenny jenny crowd control/ self control - 07/22/14 01:59 AM
BOTHEMIAN - a bazr who plays two word games and occasionally transposes the rules of both smile
Posted By: wofahulicodoc The Wanderer's Song - 07/22/14 02:14 AM

BOHEMIANU - Wordsmith the Gypsy
Posted By: jenny jenny The Wanderer's Sound and Song - 07/22/14 03:18 AM

BOPEMIAN - a discordant style jazz played by latter-day bohemians
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: The Wanderer's Sound and Song - 07/22/14 08:32 PM

DAMSON

PRONUNCIATION: (DAM-zuhn, -suhn)

MEANING: noun:
1. A variety of small plum (Prunus insititia) or its fruit.
2. A dark purple color.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin Prunum Damascenum (plum of Damascus), perhaps because it was first cultivated in Damascus or because it was introduced into Europe from Syria. Two other words coined after Damascus are damask and damascene. Earliest documented use: 1398.
______________________________

DRAMSON - a little something you ask your friendly barkeeper to pour

JAMSON - let's BOOGIE !

DAMSOX - the expected September fold came in July this year
Posted By: jenny jenny MONSOON MAXIMA - 07/23/14 01:07 PM

DAMSOON - the horrific deluge after the dam breaks
Posted By: jenny jenny GRETNA GREEN - 07/23/14 01:34 PM

Gretna Green

PRONUNCIATION: (GRET-nuh green)

MEANING:
noun:
1. A place where couples elope to to get married.
2. Such a wedding.

ETYMOLOGY:
After Gretna Green, a village in Scotland on the English border. English couples who had not reached the age of majority eloped to Gretna Green where such a wedding was permitted. A wedding was typically performed by a blacksmith in his shop. Earliest documented use: 1813.
_____________________________________________

GRETNA GREED - a fishhouse just ouside the Union County line in Mississippi where calculating young ladies can marry rich old men without being designated "gold diggers".
Posted By: wofahulicodoc phonetic replacement - 07/23/14 10:44 PM

AETNA GREEN - insurance company scrip
Posted By: Bazr the place to be?? - 07/24/14 12:52 AM
CRETNA GREEN - A place where couples go to get divorced and have a wild time.
Posted By: jenny jenny Is this the place to be? - 07/24/14 02:46 AM

GREATNAOGREEN - thegreensatnao.com

Whitehall

PRONUNCIATION: (HWYT-hawl)

MEANING:
noun: The British government or the British Civil Service.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Whitehall, a street in London, on which many government offices are located. The street gets its name from the Palace of Whitehall. Earliest documented use: 1827.
_________________________________________________________

WHITEHAIL - Nazi salute crazy

SHITEHALL - "Whitehall" as termed by guest fanatics. crazy
Posted By: Bazr Re: Is this the speak that we need? WHITEHALL - 07/25/14 12:21 AM
WHITEWALL - the perfect spot for graffiti.

WHITHEHALL - an obsolete expostulation, generally rendered in our enlightened time as "WTF"

WHITEBALL - Ping-Pong

WHITEHALF - Yin (Blackhalf is Yang)
Posted By: Bazr Re: Is this the speak that we need? WHITEHALL - 07/25/14 12:51 AM
WHITECALL - a Caucasian lost in the wild and desperate to get out.
Posted By: jenny jenny rounceval or rouncival - 07/25/14 03:37 PM
rounceval or rouncival

PRONUNCIATION: (ROUN-si-vuhl)

MEANING:
adjective: Big or strong.
noun: Someone or something that is large.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Roncesvalles, a town at the foot of the Pyrenees. It was the site of the Battle of Roncevaux Pass in 778 in which Roland, a commander of Charlemagne's army, was defeated by the Basques. Over time the story turned into a legend and giant bones of prehistoric animals discovered there were claimed to be those of heroes slain at the battle. Earliest documented use: 1570.
_________________________________________________


rouncivil - behaving civil in a rounabout way
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: rounceval or rouncival - 07/25/14 09:54 PM

ROUNDEVAL - what the players do at the Duplicate Bridge tournament while waiting for the next board to arrive at the table
Posted By: Bazr Re: rounceval or rouncival - 07/27/14 11:10 PM
BOUNCEVAL - a rounceval that is really excited.
Posted By: jenny jenny A harbinger of things gone - 07/28/14 05:05 AM
harbinger

PRONUNCIATION: (HAHR-bin-juhr)

MEANING:
noun: One that foreshadows the approach of something.
verb tr.: To signal the arrival of something.

ETYMOLOGY:
Originally, a harbinger was a host, a person who provided lodging. With time the sense changed to a person sent in advance to find lodging for an army. From Old French herbergier (to provide lodging for), from herberge (lodging). Ultimately from the Indo-European root koro- (war, host, army) which also gave us harbor, herald, harness, hurry, harangue, and harry. Earliest documented use: 1175.

USAGE:
"It is hard to elude the suspicion that it is a harbinger of further things to come."
Colby Cosh; Trigger Warnings are Easy to Ridicule; Maclean's (Toronto, Canada); Jun 2, 2014.
---------------------------------------------------------

HARBINDER - a harbinger past that binds future thinking
(see below)

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
We are social creatures to the inmost centre of our being. The notion that one can begin anything at all from scratch, free from the past, or unindebted to others, could not conceivably be more wrong. -Karl Popper, philosopher and a professor (1902-1994)
Posted By: Bazr Re: A harbinger of things gone - 07/28/14 06:16 AM
HARBUNGER - the war cry of the Koomananga tribe.
Posted By: jenny jenny To be or not to be: OBSEQUIOUS - 07/29/14 02:17 PM
obsequious

PRONUNCIATION: (ob-SEE-kwee-uhs, uhb-)

MEANING:
adjective: Behaving in an ingratiating or servile manner.

ETYMOLOGY:
Earlier the word meant obedient or dutiful, with no connotations of fawning. Over time it has taken a negative turn. From Latin obsequiosus (compliant), from obsequi (to comply), from ob- (to) + sequi (follow), which also gave us obsequy. Earliest documented use: 1447.

------------------------------------------------------------

OBSEXQUIOUS - adjective: Behaving in an ingratiating sexual manner with no accompanying connotations of fawning.

restive

PRONUNCIATION: (RES-tiv)

MEANING: adjective: Restless, uneasy.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Middle French rester (to remain), from Latin restare (to remain standing). Ultimately from the Indo-European root sta- (to stand), which is also the source of stay, stage, stable, instant, establish, static, system, stet and nihil obstat. Earliest documented use: 1549.

NOTES:
Earlier the word meant refusing to go forward, as in a restive horse. Over time the word shifted in meaning and now it means the opposite. Instead of "unable to advance", now it means "unable to remain still".
------------------------------------------------------

FESTIVE - today's "restive".
Posted By: jenny jenny GARBLE x rated - 07/31/14 04:26 AM

garble

PRONUNCIATION: (GAHR-buhl)
MEANING:
verb tr.: To distort a message, document, transmission, etc.
noun: An instance of garbling.

ETYMOLOGY:
Originally the word meant to sift, for example to remove refuse from spices. With time its meaning became distorted to what it is now. From Old Italian garbellare (to sift), from Arabic gharbala (to select). Earliest documented use: 1483.
===========================================================

GARBILE - angry words so vile they are unintelligible
Posted By: jenny jenny PABULUM and transfiguration - 08/01/14 03:19 PM

pabulum

PRONUNCIATION: (PAB-yuh-luhm)
MEANING:
noun: Bland intellectual fare: insipid or simplistic ideas, entertainment, writing, etc.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin pabulum (food, fuel, fodder), from pascere (to feed). Ultimately from the Indo-European root pa- (to protect or feed), which also gave us food, foster, fodder, forage, pasture, pantry, and companion. Earliest documented use: 1661.

NOTES:
Originally pabulum was something that nourished. During the 1920s, three Canadian pediatricians developed a bland, soft infant formula that was later marketed under the brand name Pablum and eventually the words pabulum/pablum came to refer to things simplistic or banal.

-------------------------------------------------------

PABALUME - a seemingly bland thought that under closer examination reveals great illumination
Posted By: Bazr your shout..... - 08/03/14 11:07 AM
PUBULUM - a few beers and you will call a pub anything.
stalagmite

PRONUNCIATION: (stuh-LAG-myt, STAL-uhg-myt)

MEANING:
noun: A conical column on the floor of a cave, formed by minerals in dripping water.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Greek stalaktos (dripping), from stalassein (to drip). Earliest documented use: 1681.

NOTES:
A similar tapering structure hanging from the roof of a cave is called a stalactite. It's easy to remember which is which. Ground: stalaGmite; Ceiling: stalaCtite.
----------------------------------------------------

STALAGMIT9 - a special underground Hell where the National Spleological Society sends careless people who break off stalagmites and stalactites.

* Been there, done that. frown

Posted By: wofahulicodoc seventeenth summer - 08/05/14 01:33 AM

STALAGMINE - my personal rat race
stroppy
PRONUNCIATION: STROP-ee)
MEANING:
adjective: Bad-tempered, belligerent, or touchy.


ETYMOLOGY:
Possibly from shortening of obstreperous. Earliest documented use: 1951.
--------------------------------------------------------

ASTROPPY - the theory that all the dark matter in the Universe has entropyzed. Some say that this assumption is self-evident because our inability to detect dark matter proves that all of it is gone.

STROPHY - an ancient Greek athletic honor, sung by the losing contestants as they move from right to left

STOPPY - wail of despair uttered by a three-year-old as he watches his little red wagon plunge down the hill unattended
Posted By: jenny jenny Did the Fuggers Originate Pettifogging? - 08/06/14 12:53 PM

pettifogger

PRONUNCIATION: (PET-ee-fog-uhr)
MEANING:
noun:
1. A petty, unscrupulous lawyer.
2. One who quibbles over trivial matters.

ETYMOLOGY:
From petty (small) + fogger, perhaps after Fuggers, a Bavarian family of merchants in the 15th and 16th centuries. Earliest documented use: 1564.
-------------------------------------------------------

PETRIFOGGER - a student who manipulates the findings found in a Petri Dish simply to gain favor with his biology teacher who is a jerk.

PETTIFOLGER - a very small Latte (var. PETITFOLGER)

PETTIFORGER - a counterfeit crinoline

PESTIFOGGER - sprayer for mosquito control

PETTIFLOGGER - is what I am.
Wofahulicdoc is the master flogger and he's back so don't turn your back.

PETTILOGGER - a lumberjack with a flat tire and no jack.

PETTILAGER - heavy beer misbrewed

PHILADELPHIA LAYWER

PRONUNCIATION: ((fil-uh-DEL-fee-uh LOI-yuhr)

MEANING: noun: A shrewd lawyer, one who is adept at exploiting legal technicalities.

ETYMOLOGY: The term is said to have been inspired by Philadelphia-based Andrew Hamilton's successful defense of the New York printer John Peter Zenger from libel charges. This decision helped establish the idea that truth is a defense in a libel accusation and affirmed the freedom of the press in America. Though the incident took place in 1735, the earliest documented use unearthed so far is from 1788.

. . .

THOUGHT FOR TODAY: No amount of belief makes something a fact.
- James Randi, magician and skeptic (b. 1928)

------------------------------

PHILASELPHIA LAWYER - an egotistical attorney
PHILADELPHIA LAYWEAR - what you wear in when stuck in Philadelphia.

W.C.Fields: "I spent a year in Philadelphia once...yes, I'll never forget it...it was on a Sunday".



PHILABELPHIA LAYWER - the philadelphia lawyer who cracked the bell.
PHILADELPHIA LAYER – A hen that produces cracked eggs.
Posted By: jenny jenny Bailiwick Trick - 08/08/14 12:38 PM

bailiwick

PRONUNCIATION: (BAY-luh-wik, -lee-)

MEANING:
noun: A person's area of expertise or interest.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Middle English bailliwik, from bailie (bailiff), from bail (custody), from Latin baiulare (to serve as porter) + Middle English wick (dairy farm or village), from Old English wic (house or village), from Latin vicus (neighborhood). Ultimately from the Indo-European root weik- (clan), which is also the forebear of vicinity, village, villa, and villain (originally, a villain was a farm servant, one who lived in a villa or a country house), ecumenical, and ecesis. Earliest documented use: 1460.

USAGE:
"Ms. Sarah Palin took the extraordinary step Tuesday of filing an ethics complaint against herself, making the matter fall within the bailiwick of the personnel board. Her lawyer Mr. Van Flein then asked the Legislature to drop its inquiry."
Peter S. Goodman and Michael Moss; Alaska Lawmakers to Seek Subpoenas in Palin Inquiry; The New York Times; Sep 6, 2008.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
Pick a flower on earth and you move the farthest star. -Paul Dirac, theoretical physicist (1902-1984)
------------------------------------------------------

JAILIWICK - city jail for malapropists
Posted By: wofahulicodoc It's a googly ! - 08/08/14 10:46 PM

BALLIWICK - the Game of Cricket, after Madison Avenue gets done with it

BRAILIWICK - a kerosene lantern for use by the blind

BASILIWICK - where to get information about a fantastic snakelike monster with venomous fangs and a petrifying stare
Posted By: jenny jenny INVEIGLE Women VEIGLE Men - 08/11/14 04:38 AM

inveigle

PRONUNCIATION: (in-VAY-guhl, -VEE-)
MEANING:
verb tr.: To get something or to persuade someone to do something by deception or flattery.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Old French aveugle (blind), from Latin ab- (away from) + oculus (eye). Earliest documented use: 1513.
----------------------------------------------------------

SINVEIGLE - to get someone to do your will by taking off your clothes.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc New York style - 08/12/14 01:30 AM

INBEIGLE
- (in-BAY-guhl) - where you put the cream cheese and lox
- (in-BEE-guhl) - where they go if Snoopy gets them first

emancipate

PRONUNCIATION: (i-MAN-suh-payt)

MEANING:
verb tr.: To set free.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin emancipare (to set free), from ex- (out) + mancipium (slave), from manus (hand) + capere (to take). Earliest documented use: 1605.

USAGE:
"But the larger picture is to urgently emancipate women from the clutches of poor self-esteem. The more they are encouraged to view violence against them as unacceptable, the more they can contribute to ending this social scourge."
Violence Against Women Posts Disturbing Numbers; Gulf News (Dubai); May 20, 2014.


A THOUGHT FOR TODAY
It has always seemed strange to me that in our endless discussions about education so little stress is laid on the pleasure of becoming an educated person, the enormous interest it adds to life. To be able to be caught up into the world of thought -- that is to be educated.
-Edith Hamilton, educator and writer (1867-1963)
----------------------------------------------------

REMANCIPATE - to purge your thoughts of vogue words that seem to relate to a reality - but don't.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc only if you proclaim it so - 08/13/14 01:13 AM
EO-MANCIPATE -- to set free at dawn

EMACI-PATÉ - chopped liver that makes you so sick you can't eat

EMANCIPLATE - a walk with the bases full that scores a free run
Posted By: Tromboniator Go on without me. - 08/13/14 10:52 AM
EMANCIMATE - To set free one's spouse; divorce
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Heads you win - 08/13/14 04:04 PM

CAPITULATE

PRONUNCIATION: (kuh-PICH-uh-layt)

MEANING: verb intr.: To cease resisting; surrender.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin capitulare (to draw up under headings [the articles of agreement]), from capitulum (little head, chapter), from caput (head). Ultimately from the Indo-European root kaput- (head), also the origin of head, captain, chef, chapter, cadet, cattle, chattel, achieve, biceps, mischief, and occiput, (but not of kaput). Earliest documented use: 1537.

--------------------------------

MAPITULATE - Apple and Google are still arguing about whose App to use to find places, but Google had a head start

CAVITULATE - you REALLY need to have the dentist take care of this

CAPITOLATE - the Senate session lasted until 11 PM, then they all had dinner

CAPITULATTE - OK, I give up, now gimme my coffee!
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: Heads you win - 08/13/14 09:07 PM
GAPITULATE – All right, your clothes ARE trendier than mine.

CAPNTULATE – You're the boss!

CAPITULANE – Where to go to let other drivers pass.

CAPITULAKE – I'm never gonna find that leak.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Heads you win - 08/13/14 10:53 PM

Like 'em all! But...you're sure CAPITULANE isn't the Dean of that University in N'Awlins??
Posted By: jenny jenny Heads I win Tails you lose! - 08/13/14 11:33 PM

CAPITULATER - BREAKING NEWS: President Obama just announced he is sending boots and bombs to Iraq immediately and he will capitulate later.

RAPITULATE - to rap jive to someone until they capitulate.

CAPITULANE - short for Kappi Phi Kappi at Tulane University.

COPITULATE - a police male/female team on patrol duty.


CAPITUFATE - resigned to a life of capitulation.
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: Heads you win - 08/14/14 08:02 PM
Originally Posted By: wofahulicodoc

Like 'em all! But...you're sure CAPITULANE isn't the Dean of that University in N'Awlins??


CAPITULAZE – I just don't have the energy to argue with you.
Posted By: jenny jenny INCULCATING Junior. - 08/14/14 11:54 PM
inculcate

PRONUNCIATION:
(in-KUHL-kayt, IN-kuhl-)

MEANING:
verb tr.: To instill something into the mind of a person by repetition.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin inculcare (to tread on), from in- (in) + calcare (to tread), from calx (heel). Earliest documented use: 1559.


USAGE:
"The Hong Leong Foundation also hopes to inculcate an appreciation of the arts within the group and its employees."
Long Service Awards; The Business Times (Singapore); Jul 17, 2014.

See more usage examples of inculcate in Vocabulary.com's dictionary.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
The beginnings and endings of all human undertakings are untidy. -John Galsworthy, author, Nobelist (1867-1933)
---------------------------------------------------------

KINCULCATE - to teach a hardheaded kid that the beginnings and endings of all human undertakings are untidy.
Did you hear me? I said that the beginnings and endings of all human undertakings are untidy. Don't make me get a stick...I said: The beginnings and endings of all human undertakings are untidy.

Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: INCULCATING Junior. - 08/15/14 01:02 AM

INCULCASTE - to teach a system of rigid class structure; related to HIGHERARCHY
Posted By: jenny jenny Re: INCULCATING Junior. - 08/15/14 03:25 AM


INCULTATE - to inject a dogmatic cult mindset into a cultural structure that allows free thought.
Posted By: jenny jenny RUMINATE. - 08/15/14 01:44 PM
ruminate

PRONUNCIATION: (ROO-mi-nayt)

MEANING:
verb tr., intr.:
1. To think deeply upon.
2. To chew the cud.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin ruminare (to chew the cud), from rumen (throat). Earliest documented use: 1533.
USAGE:
"It's like having little wormholes to slip into and ruminate humanity before being slapped out by the sharp turns of the plot."
Human/Being; Tehelka (New Delhi, India); Jun 18, 2012.

See more usage examples of ruminate in Vocabulary.com's dictionary.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
The willow which bends to the tempest, often escapes better than the oak which resists it; and so in great calamities, it sometimes happens that light and frivolous spirits recover their elasticity and presence of mind sooner than those of a loftier character. -Walter Scott, novelist and poet (1771-1832)
----------------------------------------------------------

DRUMINATE - to drum the Party's shibboleth into the lowinfo voter's little mind until he marches in step with the right drummer.
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: RUMINATE. - 08/15/14 03:30 PM
RUMIPATE- roommate's head
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: RUMINATE. - 08/16/14 02:44 AM

RUPINATE - to convert one's dollars to Indian currency

RUINATE - to destroy a reputation utterly. usage - "He'll be the ruination of us, just you wait'n see..."
Posted By: jenny jenny Re: RUMINATE. - 08/17/14 03:44 PM

HUMINATE - the act of humming snippets of old show tunes when composing for a new musical today.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc it's a good feeling - 08/18/14 10:45 AM

PRESENTIMENT

PRONUNCIATION: (pri-ZEN-tuh-ment)

MEANING: noun: A sense that something is going to happen, especially something bad.

ETYMOLOGY: From French pressentiment (premonition), from pressentir (to have a premonition), from Latin pre- (before) + sentire (to feel). Ultimately from the Indo-European root sent- (to head for or to go), that is also the source for send, scent, sense, sentence, assent, consent, and ressentiment. Earliest documented use: 1663.

------------------------------

PROSENTIMENT - I'm all for it !
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: it's a panicky feeling - 08/18/14 12:14 PM
PRESENDIMENT – The feeling, just a nanosecond before the finger descends upon the mouse button to release an email, and too late to stop it, that it's a really, really bad idea.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc curiously strong - 08/18/14 03:01 PM

PRESENTIMINT - the gift of Altoids
Posted By: jenny jenny It's an honest feeling - 08/18/14 03:04 PM


RESENTIMENT - the feeling that the two posts above yours are better, brighter, and funnier than your post so you go get a beer and turn on the TV.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: It's an honest feeling - 08/18/14 03:09 PM

Don't sell yourself short, Kiddo

Actually this is a great word, fraught with possibilities. Unlike many of last week's words, which were limited and constricting. (When's the last time you saw "fraught" used in a conversation? smile )
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: It's an honest feeling - 08/19/14 01:09 AM

PRESENTIENT - I just haven't thought of it yet...
Posted By: jenny jenny A FUNGIBLE FRIEND - 08/19/14 05:12 AM
fungible

PRONUNCIATION: (FUHN-juh-buhl)
MEANING: adjective: Interchangeable.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin fungi (to perform in place). Earliest documented use: 1765.
NOTES:
When you lend someone a dollar bill, you don't care if he returns the same bill or a different one because money is fungible. Same with things such as gold, a cup of sugar, etc. However, if you lend someone your cell phone, you wouldn't be pleased if he returned a different phone even if it's exactly the same model. That would be an example of something nonfungible.

USAGE:
"Forbidden to own land for most of our two millennia of exile, we gradually became experts in accumulating capital, which is portable, easily inheritable, fungible, and expandable."
Ellen Frankel; Taking Stock; The Jerusalem Report (Israel); May 19, 2014.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
There is only one way to achieve happiness on this terrestrial ball, and that is to have either a clear conscience or none at all. -Ogden Nash, poet (1902-1971)
===========================================================

JUNGIBLE - hippies, Eastern mystics, and Carl Jung
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: A FUNGIBLE FRIEND - 08/19/14 04:44 PM

FUNGICLE - an iced summer treat-on-a-stick, made of tofu
Posted By: jenny jenny PLANGENTERY - 08/20/14 04:35 AM

plangent

PRONUNCIATION: (PLAN-juhnt)
MEANING:
adjective:
1. Loud and resounding.
2. Sad or mournful.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin plangere (to beat the br- east, lament). Ultimately from the Indo-European root plak- (to strike), which also gave us plague, plankton, fling, and complain. Earliest documented use: 1666.

USAGE:
"When the two horns answered each other's plangent calls from opposite sides of the vast auditorium the effect was electrifying."
A Majestic Canon; The Economist (London, UK); Sep 4, 2003.

"Enthrallingly told, beautifully written, and so emotionally plangent that some passages bring tears."
Amanda Vaill; A Luminous Novel of Children in War ("All the Light We Cannot See"); The Washington Post; May 6, 2014.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Creative minds are uneven, and the best of fabrics have their dull spots. -HP Lovecraft, short-story writer and novelist (1890-1937)
-------------------------------------------------------------

PLANGVENT - to vent grief by resounding moaning
Posted By: wofahulicodoc PLANGENT - 08/20/14 05:08 PM
FLANGENT - the chef who specializes in custard desserts

PLANTGENT - the toff is a farmer

PLANGENU - what the orthopedist does before your knee surgery*

PLANGEST - they just don't come any planger than that!


*("genu* being what a doctor calls a knee. As in "genuflect.")
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Carry on - 08/21/14 04:08 PM

DEPORTMENT

PRONUNCIATION: (di-PORT-ment)

MEANING: noun: The manner in which one conducts oneself in public.

ETYMOLOGY: From French déportement, from Latin deportare, from de- (away) + portare (carry). Ultimately from the Indo-European root per- (to lead, pass over), which also gave us support, comport, petroleum, sport, passport, colporteur (a peddler of religious books), rapporteur, Norwegian fjord (bay), and Sanskrit parvat (mountain). Earliest documented use: 1601.

------------------------------------

DETORTMENT - clearing of civil wrongdoing

DEPOSTMENT - closing postoffices to save money, and the public convenience be damned

DEFORTMENT - you get the idea

DEEPORTMENT - building an offshore shiploading facility over the Marianas Trench
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Carry on - 08/22/14 10:29 AM

DEPORTMEN - the INS
Posted By: wofahulicodoc there's no escaping it - 08/22/14 12:48 PM

PUISSANCE

PRONUNCIATION: (PWIS-uhns, PYOO-i-suhns)

MEANING: noun: Power or strength.

ETYMOLOGY: From Old French puissance (power), from Latin posse (to be able). Ultimately from the Indo-European root poti- (powerful, lord) which also gave us possess, power, possible, posse, potent, plenipotentiary, Italian podesta, and Turkish pasha (via Persian). Earliest documented use: 1420

--------------------------

P.U. -ISTANCE - the event "scent horizon" around a black skunk. (If you get any closer you're doomed!)

Posted By: wofahulicodoc speaking of Old French... - 08/23/14 11:45 AM

there's also

NUISSANCE - always making a pest of oneself

and

OUI-SSANCE - saying "yes" to everything
Posted By: wofahulicodoc heads up, again - 08/25/14 09:27 PM

RECAPITULATE

PRONUNCIATION: ree-kuh-PICH-uh-layt)

MEANING: verb tr., intr.: To recap or to repeat.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin recapitulare (to sum up), re- (again) + capitulare (to draw up under headings), from capitulum (little head, chapter), from caput (head). Ultimately from the Indo-European root kaput- (head), also the origin of head, captain, chef, chapter, cadet, cattle, chattel, achieve, biceps, mischief, and occiput. Earliest documented use: 1551.

---------------------------------------

PRECAPITULATE - the fix is in

RECAPITULANTE - throw good money after bad; keep playing Poker when you're deep on the hole

REDCAPITULATE - the Baggage-Handlers' Union has agreed to a new contract
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: heads up, again - 08/27/14 12:31 AM

DEGUST

PRONUNCIATION: (di-GUHST)

MEANING: verb tr.: To taste or savor appreciatively.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin degustare (to taste), from de- (completely) + gustare (to taste). Ultimately from the Indo-European root geus- (to taste or choose), which also gave us choice, choose, gusto, ragout, and disgust. Earliest documented use: 1623.

---------------------------------------

DOGUST (rhymes with August) - the hot sultry days of summer

DEGAUST - removed residual magnetism

DEBUST - 1) post someone's bail; 2) what the Amazons did to themselves so they'd be better archers
Posted By: wofahulicodoc another rule, another exception - 08/27/14 06:38 PM

REPROVE

PRONUNCIATION: (ri-PROOV)

MEANING: verb tr.: To reprimand or censure.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin reprobare (to disapprove), from re- (opposite) + probare (to approve), from probus (good). Earliest documented use: 1330.

----------------------------------

RYEPROVE - verify that your Canadian Club hasn't been diluted

REPLOVE - the endorphin high that makes you happy to continue exercising
Posted By: wofahulicodoc I'm going to declare a recess now - 08/28/14 12:04 PM

PROROGUE

PRONUNCIATION: (pro-ROHG)

MEANING: verb tr.:
1. To discontinue a session of something, for example, a parliament.
2. To defer or to postpone.

ETYMOLOGY: From French proroger (to adjourn), from Latin prorogare (to prolong or defer), from pro- (before) + rogare (to ask). Ultimately from the Indo-European root reg- (to move in a straight line, to lead or rule), which is also the source of regime, direct, rectangle, erect, rectum, alert, source, and surge. Earliest documented use: 1419.

---------------------------------------

PRE-ROGUE - young scamp (cf. PRIOROGUE)

PYRO-ROGUE - arsonist

UPROR-OGUE - that Victoria's Secret sales brochure is so offensive, people everywhere are complaining loudly

Posted By: wofahulicodoc think pastry - 08/28/14 01:00 PM

PEROROGUE - a Pololish dumplumpling

REPOSE

PRONUNCIATION: (ri-POHZ)

MEANING:
noun:
1. A state of rest.
2. Calmness.

verb intr.:
3. To lie down.
4. To lie dead.

verb tr.:
5. To lay at rest.
6. To place confidence in someone or something.
7. To put something somewhere.

ETYMOLOGY:
For 1-5: From Latin repausare (to cause to rest), from re- (intensive prefix) + pausare (to rest), from pausa (rest). Earliest documented use: 1450.
For 6-7: From Latin reponere (to store up), from ponere (to put). Ultimately from the Indo-European root apo- (off or away) that is also the source of after, off, awkward, post, and puny. Earliest documented use: 1440.

-----------------------------

REPOSSE - Saddle up yer hosses one more time, boys, we got to chase down and ketch them varmints agin

REPOSY (ant. of LACKADAISICAL) - replace the missing flower
Posted By: wofahulicodoc and a good Labor Day to you all - 09/01/14 08:47 PM

CONSONANCE

PRONUNCIATION: (KON-suh-nuhns)

MEANING: noun:
1. Agreement or accord.
2. A combination of sounds pleasing to the ear.
3. The repetition of consonant sounds, especially at the ends of words, such as st in the phrase first and last.

ETYMOLOGY:
Via French, from Latin con- (with) + sonare (to sound), from sonus (sound). Ultimately from the Indo-European root swen- (to sound), which also gave us sound, sonic, sonnet, sonata, and unison. Earliest documented use: 1430.

---------------------------

CONSONANCE - all the letters but A E I O and U (the "identity" transformation)

COINSONANCE - random noises that happen to sound nice together

RONSONANCE - the click made by an old cigarette lighter

CONSONACE - that little squeak at the poker table made by a pair of bullets in the hole as you gently open them into view

LEVEE

PRONUNCIATION: (LEV-ee)

MEANING: noun:
1. An embankment made to prevent flooding.
2. An embankment around a field that is to be irrigated.
3. A landing place; a quay.
4. A formal reception.

ETYMOLOGY:
For 1-3: From French levée, past participle of lever (to raise). Earliest documented use: 1718.
For 4: From French levé, variant of lever (rising from bed), from lever (to rise). Originally, a levee was a meeting held on a royal's rising from bed. Earliest documented use: 1700.

-----------------------------------

LEVET - where you bring LE DOG to get LE RABIES-SHOT

ALEVEE - Naproxen For Her


PROW

PRONUNCIATION: (prou)

MEANING: noun:
1. The front of a ship or a boat above the water; the bow.
2. The projecting front part of something, as a building.
adjective:
3. Valiant.

ETYMOLOGY: For 1-2: From Middle French proue, from Old Italian dialect prua, from Latin prora. Ultimately from the Indo-European root per- (forward), which also gave us paramount, prime, proton, Czech prám (raft), German Frau (woman), and Hindi purana (old). Earliest documented use: 1555.
For 3: From Middle French prou, from Old English prud. Earliest documented use: 1350.

-------------------------------------

(since we're talking of words with more than one meaning...)

PHROW
1. a line-up of chemicals arranged in order of their acidity (sometimes written pHROW)
2. a scam email trying to sell you a fake German wife
Quote:
it's called "prowess" when a woman has it

As in: "The guys stood there amazed, ogling her prowess."

Not sure I want to compete on your level, Doc. pHROW=WOW!

MROW
1. The sound projecting from the front part of a cat.
2. Personification of pain, who sometimes accompanies his friend Mean Ol' Mr. Gravity.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc those short little words are tough - 09/05/14 01:46 AM

ROTE

PRONUNCIATION: (roht)

MEANING: noun:
1. A mechanical or unthinking way of doing something.
2. The sound of surf.
3. A medieval stringed instrument or Celtic origin. Also known as crowd or crwth.

ETYMOLOGY:
For 1: Of obscure origin. Earliest documented use: 1325.
For 2: Perhaps of Scandinavian origin. Earliest documented use: 1610.
For 3: From Middle French rote. Earliest documented use: 1330.

------------------------------

ROTEL - first win the crew race, then make sure everybody knows about it
pronunciation: row-TELL

Posted By: wofahulicodoc some of the longer ones are, too - 09/06/14 02:10 AM

LOBLOLLY

PRONUNCIATION: (LOB-lol-ee)

MEANING: noun:
1. A thick gruel.
2. Mire; mudhole.
3. An assistant to a ship's surgeon.
4. A pine tree with long needles and strong wood (Pinus taeda).
5. An evergreen, loblolly-bay (Gordonia lasianthus).

ETYMOLOGY: Apparently from lob (an onomatopoeic word representing the sound of bubbling while boiling) + lolly (an English dialectal word for broth, soup, etc.). The use of the word for mire or a mudhole is from the porridge-like consistency of the contents of mire or mudhole. The word came to be used for a medical assistant because he fed the patients. The trees received this name from their prevalence in swamp lands. Earliest documented use: 1597.

-------------------------

1.
a. LOB/LOWLY - Throw me a slow one so I can hit it out of the infield!
b. LO/BLOWLY - How the boxer was hitting, which got him disqualified and lost him his bout

2.
LOBDOLLY - Toss me my Raggedy Ann, please
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: some of the longer ones are, too - 09/06/14 12:08 PM
LABLOLLY – Not much for finding the right reagents, but oh, you kid!
Posted By: wofahulicodoc not very effective, that - 09/08/14 08:17 PM

DISAFFECT

PRONUNCIATION: (dis-uh-FEKT)

MEANING: verb tr.: To alienate the support or loyalty of someone.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin dis- (away) + affectare (to aim at, to strive after), from ad- (to) + facere (to do). Earliest documented use: 1621.

-----------------------------------

DISAFFLECT - Ben has been removed from the cast of this film

DISHAFFECT - I hate the drying even more than the washing

DISTAFF-E.C.T. - electroshock therapy for the wife
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: not very effective, that - 09/10/14 01:05 AM

VOUCHSAFE

PRONUNCIATION: (vouch-SAYF)

MEANING: verb tr.: To grant or give something as if as a favor.
verb intr.: To condescend.

ETYMOLOGY: Via French, from Latin vocare (to call) + salvus (whole, intact). Earliest documented use: 1303.


------------------------------

VOUCHSALE - My endorsement is available, for a moderate fee

COUCHSAFE - a condom to be used in your living room
Posted By: wofahulicodoc DIS ABUSE will not be tolerated - 09/10/14 04:51 PM

DISABUSE

PRONUNCIATION: (dis-uh-BYOOZ)

MEANING: verb tr.: To free from a mistaken belief or error.

ETYMOLOGY: Via French, from Latin dis- (away) + abusus (misuse, wasting). Earliest documented use: 1611.

---------------------------------

DAISABUSE - The After-Dinner Speaker is going on way too long

DISAMUSE - T'ain't funny, McGee.


PROMULGATE

PRONUNCIATION: (PROM-uhl-gayt, pro-MUHL-)

MEANING: verb tr.:
1. To make a law, rule, etc. known by public declaration.
2. To make publicly known an idea, belief, etc.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin promulgare (to make known), from pro- (forward) + mulgere (to milk, to cause to come out). Earliest documented use: 1526.

-------------------------------------

PROVULGATE - encouraging the widespread adoption of the Late Fourth Century Latin version of the Bible

PROMULGAT - Second Amendment enthusiast

PROMULGAZE - the hooker scans the passersby considering which of them will be her next customer

DISSUADE

PRONUNCIATION: (di-SWAYD)

MEANING: verb tr.: To convince someone not to do something.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin dissuadere (to advise against), from dis- (away) + suadere (to advise), from suavis (sweet). Ultimately from the Indo-European root swad- (sweet, pleasant), which also gave us sweet, suave, hedonism, persuade, Hindi swad (taste), suasion, and incunabulum. Earliest documented use: 1535.

____________________________________


DISQUADE - to make fun of one or more party arrivals (either gender) trying to look cool and sexy (see here)

DISSUEDE - to remove the soft leather from your jacket or shoes; more broadly, to discard any leather products in your possession
Posted By: wofahulicodoc if it should come to pass - 09/16/14 12:37 AM

MAYHAP

PRONUNCIATION: (may-HAP, MAY-hap)

MEANING: adverb: Perhaps.

ETYMOLOGY: From the phrase 'it may hap', from Middle English hap, from Old Norse happ (luck, chance). Earliest documented use: 1533.
___________________________________________


MAYHARP - stringed instrument for use while dancing around a pole

MATHAP - it does adding and multiplying and algebra and calculus on your telephone
Posted By: wofahulicodoc just another aphorism - 09/16/14 10:51 PM

A FORTIORI

PRONUNCIATION: (ah fort-tee-OR-ee, ay-for-shee-OR-eye)

MEANING: adverb: For an even stronger reason; even more so.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin, literally, from the stronger. Earliest documented use: 1569.

_________________________________

A. FORTISORI - coming from the pen of a former Supreme Court Justice
Posted By: wofahulicodoc career, v. - 09/18/14 02:17 AM

VERILY

PRONUNCIATION: (VER-uh-lee)

MEANING: adverb: In truth, indeed, truly, certainly.

ETYMOLOGY: From Middle English verraily, from verrai/verray (very), from Old French verai (true), from vulgar Latin veracus, from Latin verax (truthful). Earliest documented use: 1303.

______________________________

VEERILY - how a drunk drives
Posted By: wofahulicodoc perchance: tendency to roosr ? - 09/18/14 10:58 AM

PERCHANCE

PRONUNCIATION: (puhr-CHANS)

MEANING: adverb: Perhaps; maybe.

ETYMOLOGY: From Old French par cheance (by chance), from Latin per (by, through) + cadentia (fall), from cadere (to fall). Ultimately from the Indo-European root kad- (to fall), which is also the source of cadence, cascade, casualty, cadaver, chance, chute, accident, occident, decay, recidivism, and casuistry. Earliest documented use: 1350.

--------------------

PURCHANCE - buying power

PEERCHANCE - the American jury system
Posted By: May Re: perchance: tendency to roosr ? - 09/18/14 04:04 PM
Purrchance- ambiguous message from your cat.

Pierchance- "To take a walk and forget where you started from." (A walking cliché that ends with a preposition.)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc perchance: tendency to roost ? - 09/18/14 08:35 PM

Hi, May, and welcome!

To all - forgive my sloppily typed heading - it's supposed to be "PERCH-ANCE: tendency to roost"

blush (that means "My face is red")
Posted By: May Re: perchance: tendency to roost ? - 09/19/14 09:02 PM
Thank you. smile
Mayhappenstance // I was curious, yet didn't make the connection.(Chanticleer, ;))

Best wishes
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: perchance: tendency to roost ? - 09/20/14 01:21 AM

LIEF

PRONUNCIATION: (leef)

MEANING:
adverb: Willingly; gladly; readily.
adjective: 1. Dear, beloved. 2. Willing.

ETYMOLOGY: From Old English leof (dear). Ultimately from the Indo-European root leubh- (to love or to care), which also gave us love, belief, and leave (permission). Earliest documented use: 897.

________________________________

IIEF - Institute of Industrial Electronics Engineering [IIEE], The Next Generation

LIEA - my dyslexic Star Wars heroine (not to be confused with my dyslexic spouse, or WIEF)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: perchance: tendency to roost ? - 09/22/14 05:25 PM

FISSIPAROUS

PRONUNCIATION: (fi-SIP-uh-ruhs)

MEANING: adjective:
1. Tending to break into parts.
2. Reproducing by biological fission.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin fissi- (cleft) + -parous (bearing, producing). Earliest documented use: 1835.
_______________________________________

MISSIPAROUS - giving rise to a great river

FISHIPAROUS - Latin for "icthyogenetic"

FISSIPOROUS - full of cracks, and water goes right through it, too

TELEOLOGY

PRONUNCIATION: (tel-ee-OL-uh-jee)

MEANING: noun:
1. The belief or the study of design or purpose in nature.
2. Such design or purpose.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek tele- (far, end) + -logy (study). Earliest documented use: 1742.
________________________________________


TEEOLOGY - (golf) how to pick just the right ball support for your drive

TELEPOLOGY - an expression of regret offered after you're far enough away to escape retaliation

TELEOLOGE - the nosebleed seats in a truly gigantic theater
Posted By: wofahulicodoc XEROX machines make dry copies - 09/24/14 08:19 PM

XEROPHILOUS

PRONUNCIATION: (zee-ROF-uh-luhs)

MEANING: adjective: Adapted to a very dry or desert environment.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek xero- (dry) + -philous (liking). Earliest documented use: 1863.

_______________________________________


XEROPILOUS - having dry hair

NEROPHILOUS - fond of overweight, precise, word-loving detectives

ZEROPHILOUS - doesn't like anything
Posted By: wofahulicodoc the moving finger writes - 09/25/14 05:44 PM

DACTYLOSCOPY

PRONUNCIATION: (dak-tuh-LOS-kuh-pee)

MEANING: noun: The analysis of fingerprints for identification of individuals.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek dactylo- (finger or toe) + -scopy (observation). Earliest documented use: 1908.

________________________________________

DACTYLOSCOOPY - hand-packed (like some ice cream)

DACTYLOCOPY - a counterfeit fingerprint

DACRYLOSCOPY - taking pictures only of clothes made with man-made fibers
Posted By: wofahulicodoc The moving finger draws cartoons - 09/27/14 12:50 AM

PLUTOMANIA

PRONUNCIATION: (ploo-tuh-MAY-nee-uh)

MEANING: noun: An obsession with money or wealth.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek pluto- (wealth) + -mania (excessive enthusiasm or craze). Earliest documented use: 1652.

____________________________

PLUTOMARIA - The new Disney movie where the dog mutinies and takes over Christopher Columbus' largest ship

PLUROMANIA - no singles allowed

FLUTOMANIA - James Galway ROCKS, and Jean-Pierre Rampal, too!
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Up in the Air, Junior Birdmen - 09/29/14 09:21 PM

LUFTMENSCH

PRONUNCIATION: (LOOFT-mensh)

MEANING: noun: An impractical dreamer.

ETYMOLOGY: From Yiddish, from luft (air) + mensch (man, person), from German. Earliest documented use: 1907.
___________________________________


LUFTMESCH-- the fabric that covers airplane wings (in the early days of aviation, anyway)

LUFTMENSACH - The Right Stuff (the qualities that make one an airmen/test pilot)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Up in the Air, Junior Birdmen - 09/30/14 04:20 PM

PISHER

PRONUNCIATION: (PISH-uhr)

MEANING: noun:
1. A bedwetter.
2. A young, inexperienced person.
3. An insignificant person: a nobody.

ETYMOLOGY: From Yiddish pisher (pisser), from German pissen (to urinate). Earliest documented use: 1941.

_________________________________________


PAISHER - a simple card game, when preceded by PISHER

PISER - a man who is pathologically averse to spending money. Compare MISER, a woman who is...)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Stop,l thief ! - 10/01/14 03:35 PM

GANEF

PRONUNCIATION: (GAH-nuhf)

MEANING: noun: A thief, swindler, or rascal.

ETYMOLOGY: From Yiddish, from Hebrew gannabh (thief). Earliest documented use: 1920.
__________________________________


GANER - a Bostonian who doesn't have a long time left to live

GANFF - a national park in Canada, renamed after being renovated to attract tourists with clubs and balls to be hit into holes in the lowest possible number of strokes (see GALEF)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc an international crew - 10/02/14 12:35 PM

MACHER

PRONUNCIATION: (MAHKH-uhr)

MEANING: noun:
1. A person of influence, one who gets things done.
2. A self-important overbearing person.

ETYMOLOGY: From Yiddish makher, from German macher (maker or doer). Earliest documented use: 1911.

________________________________________

MANCHER - someone who lives on the French side of the English Channel

MALHER - a dyslexic German composer

MAC-HEF - an Irish playboy, familiarly (with apologies to J.M.Synge)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Kibble and bits - 10/03/14 04:47 PM

KIBITZER

PRONUNCIATION: (KIB-it-suhr)

MEANING: noun: An onlooker who offers unwanted advice or criticism, for example at a card game.

ETYMOLOGY: From Yiddish kibitsen, from German kiebitzen (to look on at cards), from Kiebitz (busybody, literally pewit or lapwing, a shorebird with a bad reputation as a meddler). Earliest documented use: 1927.

__________________________________


KIBUTZER - a dweller in an Israeli collective community

KOBITZER - someone who offers unwanted advice from the sidelines about how to raise prime Japanese beef

KIBITER - a rare insect that gnaws on the ebonies and the ivories on your piano

SKIBITZER - an enterpreneur who sells chic frills and furbelows and other doodads ("bitz") for your skis
Posted By: wofahulicodoc around here we call it "smarmy" - 10/07/14 01:52 AM
LUBRICIOUS

PRONUNCIATION: (loo-BRISH-uhs)

MEANING: adjective:
1. Lecherous.
2. Salacious.
3. Shifty or tricky.
4. Smooth and slippery.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin lubricus (slippery, smooth). Ultimately from the Indo-European root sleubh- (to slide or slip), which also gave us slip, slop, sloop, sleeve, and lubricate. Earliest documented use: 1584.

____________________________


LUBRICITOUS - specializing in in grease-and-oil jobs for your upscale car

RUBRICIOUS - tending - overpedantcally - to classify everything

LUMBRICIOUS - having hyperactive fingers or toes
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Damned if I know ! - 10/07/14 01:23 PM

DIFFIDENT

PRONUNCIATION: (DIF-i-duhnt)

MEANING: adjective: Lacking in self-confidence.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin diffidere (to mistrust), from dis- (not) + fidere (to trust). Ultimately from the Indo-European root bheidh- (to trust), which also gave us abide, abode, fiancé, affidavit, confide, confident, defiance, fidelity, defy, and infidel. Earliest documented use: 1598.

_____________________________________________

DIFFIDONT - and D if I do, too...

DAFFIDENT - One of the flowers in by bouquet is damaged, but I don't want to make a fuss (compare LACKADAISICAL)

Posted By: Tromboniator I know you! - 10/08/14 08:08 AM
DOFFIDENT – Take it off and be recognized.
DAFFIDENT – 2. Scarce as duck's teeth.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Ebola, anyone? - 10/09/14 02:49 AM

VIRULENT

PRONUNCIATION: (VIR-yuh-luhnt, -uh-)

MEANING: adjective
1. Bitterly hostile.
2. Highly infective.
3. Extremely dangerous.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin virus (poison). Earliest documented use: 1400.
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

[Are we sure? I thought it had something to do with vir, meaning "man," as in "virile".}
________________________________

VIRUSENT - a sub-cellular microorganism afflicting Tolkien's tree creatures

MIRULENT - that Russian Space Station I borrowed from you a while back
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Ebola, anyone? - 10/10/14 02:31 AM

CONVIVIAL

PRONUNCIATION: (kuhn-VIV-ee-uhl)

MEANING: adjective: Friendly; sociable; cheerful; jovial.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin convivium (feast), from con- (with) + vivere (to live). Earliest documented use: 1669.

_______________________________

CONNIVIAL - sneaky, underhanded, scheming
Posted By: wofahulicodoc goingness before a fall - 10/10/14 12:10 PM

ORGULOUS

PRONUNCIATION: (OR-gyuh-luhs)

MEANING: adjective: Haughty.

ETYMOLOGY: From Old French orguill (pride). Earliest documented use: 1275.

__________________________________


OREGULOUS - a pizza with too much herb sprinkled on it

ORGULOTUS - the pride of Yoga
Posted By: wofahulicodoc it's all Greek to me - 10/14/14 01:05 AM

Greek-mythology-derived words? This is going to be one tough week!

ODYSSEY

PRONUNCIATION: (AH-duh-see)

MEANING: noun: A long eventful journey or experience.

ETYMOLOGY: After Odysseus, whose 10-year wandering after the fall of Troy is described in Homer's epic poem, the Odyssey. Earliest documented use: 1886.

___________________________________

CODYSSEY - Buffalo Bill wandered around the Old West for ten eventful years before reaching home

ODYSSKY - half Irish, half Polish

GODYSSEY - like a female deity; compare ODYSSHEY
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: it's all Greek to me - 10/14/14 11:34 AM
ODDYSSEY – 1. A long peculiar journey.
2. A journey that is uneventful at stops two, four, six, eight,…

OLDYSSEY – Same endless sh**, different day.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: it's all Greek to me - 10/15/14 02:17 AM
Good to have you along, T - it's hard for one person to keep this up all by hisself.

I liked the onethreefiveyssey !

_________________________________

CIMMERIAN

PRONUNCIATION: (si-MIR-ee-uhn)

MEANING: adjective: Very dark or gloomy.

ETYMOLOGY: After Cimmerians, a mythical people described in Homer's Odyssey, who lived in perpetual darkness at the entrance of Hades. The historical Cimmerians, who lived in Crimea, were unrelated. Earliest documented use: 1594.

___________________________

C-IMMERSIAN - a believer that the only valid baptism is in the ocean

CIMMELIANS - a mythical people who changed their skin color to blend in perfectly with their surroundings (pronounced with a hard C)
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: it's all Greek to me - 10/15/14 05:44 AM
I've been been otherwise busy, with rehearsals and performances of Les Misérables for the past several weeks, one more rehearsal and four more performances this week. Hope to be more active here again.

Peter

Fun! Vive les gendarmes!
__________________________________

NARCISSIST

PRONUNCIATION: (NAHR-si-sist)

MEANING: noun: Someone with excessive self-interest or self-love.

ETYMOLOGY: In Greek mythology, Narcissus was a hunter and a young man of exceptional beauty. He spurned the nymph Echo. One day he saw his reflection in water and fell in love with himself. Not realizing it was himself and unable to leave, he eventually died. Earliest documented use: 1917.

_________________________________

NARCASSIST - a spy planted by the DEA

ANARCISSIST - someone who wants to topple the government, so there'll be no interference with his right to gaze raptly at his reflection in the water

NARCINSIST - now you see why they call him "pusher"
Posted By: wofahulicodoc ...he said, shrugging - 10/16/14 07:29 PM

ATLAS

PRONUNCIATION: (AT-luhs)

MEANING: noun:
1. A person who supports a great burden.
2. A book of maps, charts, tables, plates, etc.
3. The top vertebra of the backbone, which supports the skull.
4. A size of drawing paper 26x33 or 26x34 inches.
5. An architectural column in the shape of a man. (Plural: atlantes. Another word for this is telamon. The female equivalent is caryatid.)

ETYMOLOGY: After Atlas, a Titan in Greek mythology, who was condemned by Zeus to support the heavens. A book of maps is called an atlas because early books of this kind depicted Atlas on the cover holding the earth on his shoulders. Earliest documented use: 1589.

____________________________

ANTLAS - a deer's horns, as described by a Bostonian

ATTAS - a quadripedal fighting machine, designed by a dyslexic Star Wars illustrator

ATLA - where my flight to Hollywood is arriving (see also ATLAX)
Posted By: Tromboniator Rats! - 10/16/14 11:26 PM
ALLAS - EVERYTHING sucks.
ATLAB - Finally, test results.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc The Boatman Cometh - 10/17/14 08:34 PM

CHARON

PRONUNCIATION: (KER-uhn)

MEANING: noun: A ferryman.

ETYMOLOGY: After Charon, the old man who transported the souls of the dead across the rivers Styx and Acheron to Hades. In some cultures a coin was put in the mouth of the dead to pay for the ferry ride. Also see psychopomp. Earliest documented use: 1522.
________________________________________

CHORON - the fundamental particle of group singing

ICHARON - the Headless Weasley

CHAROL - a Christmas tune sung by the cleaning lady

______________________________________

Bonus Word:
PSYCHOPOMP - the high-falutin' jargon of the counseling industry, akin to PSYCHOBABBLE
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Halfway home - 10/21/14 01:11 AM

MULLION

PRONUNCIATION: (MUHL-yuhn)

MEANING: noun: A vertical piece of stone, wood, metal, etc., dividing a window or other opening.

ETYMOLOGY: From transposition of sounds of Middle English moniel, from Anglo-Norman moynel, from Latin medius (middle). Ultimately from the Indo-European root medhyo- (middle), which is also the source of middle, mean, medium, medal (originally a coin worth a halfpenny), mezzanine, mediocre, Mediterranean, moiety, and Hindi madhya (middle). Earliest documented use: 1556.

______________________________________

MULTI-ON -
1. the main switch on a multi-switch light board that sends power to all the circuits simultaneously
2. descrbing a Japanese honored with many, many obligations

MULLIGON - a closed geometric figure with mulli sides
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Executive Clement-cy - 10/21/14 03:35 PM
SPRATTLE

PRONUNCIATION: (SPRAT-l)

MEANING:
noun: A scramble or struggle.
verb intr.: To scramble or struggle.

ETYMOLOGY: From Scottish sprattle, from switching of sounds in spartle (to scatter). Earliest documented use: 1500

______________________________________


SPRATTLEE -
1) a mist descending upon the former Prime Minister
2) on the sheltered side of the little fish

SPATTLE - a small tiff

SOPRATTLE - a singer with a frog in her throat

_____________________________

Aside: do Spoonerisms count for purposes of this week's theme? Think "sideburns" (sported by Civil War General Burnsides) and butterfly (from "flutterby'" which evocatively describes what they do).

(PS Or are these just Urban Myths?)
Posted By: LukeJavan8 -chit chat - 10/21/14 03:42 PM
PRATTLE
Posted By: Tromboniator Chief Urbanity - 10/21/14 11:27 PM
SPEATTLE – City in the Specific Northwest
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Chief Urbanity - 10/22/14 12:12 AM

Bravo!
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: Chief Urbanity - 10/22/14 02:26 AM
*bows humbly*
Posted By: wofahulicodoc More Urbanity, just a different Urb - 10/22/14 05:23 PM

BRUMMAGEM

PRONUNCIATION: (BRUM-uh-juhm)

MEANING:
adjective: Cheap and showy.
noun: Something that is counterfeit or of inferior quality.

ETYMOLOGY: After Brummagem, a dialectal alteration of Birmingham, UK, where counterfeit coins were produced in the 17th century. Brummie is a nickname for someone from Birmingham. Earliest documented use: 1637.

___________________________________

BUMMAGEM - What I was when, with no money, no home, no friends, I had to hit the road agaim


Speaking of sights along the road -

That Shaving Cream / We Used To Sell / It's Modern Now / Called BRUMMAGEL!
Posted By: LukeJavan8 - Brylcreem - 10/22/14 05:25 PM
BRUMMAGEL-hair mousse
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: - Brylcreem - 10/23/14 02:01 AM

Beau-tiful, Luke !
Posted By: wofahulicodoc take it or leave it - 10/23/14 11:03 PM

PERNANCY

PRONUNCIATION: (PUHR-nuhn-see)

MEANING: noun: A taking or receiving of rent, profit, etc.

ETYMOLOGY: From Anglo-French pernance, by switching of sounds of prenance (taking), from prendre, from Latin prehendere (to seize). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ghend-/ghed- (to seize or to take), which is also the source of pry, prey, spree, reprise, surprise, osprey, prison, reprehend, impregnable, impresa, and prise. Earliest documented use: 1626.

_________________________________

PERGNANCY - garvidity

PERRNANCY - the quality that makes one a Spanish dog

PERINANCY - Sluggo and Aunt Fritzi Ritz and those guys
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: take it or leave it - 10/24/14 09:36 AM
PENNANCY – A flagging tendency.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: take it or leave it - 10/25/14 03:55 AM

GIRN

PRONUNCIATION: (gurn)

MEANING:
verb intr.: To snarl, grimace, or complain.
noun: A grimace or snarl.

ETYMOLOGY: By transposition of the word grin, from Old English grennian (to show teeth). Earliest documented use: 1440.

__________________________

GIRVN - a foot soldier in the army oF the Republic of Viet Nam
Posted By: wofahulicodoc It's a double-dactyl! - 10/27/14 04:36 PM

ANTIMETABOLE

PRONUNCIATION: (AN-ti-muh-TAB-uh-lee)

MEANING: noun: A repetition of words or an idea in a reverse order.
Example: "To fail to plan is to plan to fail."

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek antimetabole, from anti- (opposite) + metabole (change), from meta- (after, along) + bole (a throw). Earliest documented use: 1589.

______________________________________________


ANTIMETABLE - what the grammatically-challenged child might use to learn multiplication

ANATIMETABOLE - that new Medical School course where you learn not just the parts of the body and their relationships but also their biochemical pathways

ANDIMETABOLE - what else happened after I was screaming down the road on my motorcycle, and lost control, and ran into a tree
Posted By: wofahulicodoc non-parallel structure...and then some - 10/28/14 04:07 PM

ZEUGMA

PRONUNCIATION: (ZOOG-muh)

MEANING: noun: The use of a word to refer to two or more words, especially in different senses. Examples: "He caught a fish and a cold" or "She lost her ring and her temper."

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin zeugma, from Greek zeugma (a joining). Ultimately from the Indo-European root yeug- (to join), which is also the ancestor of junction, yoke, yoga, adjust, juxtapose, junta, junto, syzygy, jugular, and rejoinder. Earliest documented use: 1589.

NOTES: There's a similar term, syllepsis, but the two are more or less synonymous now. You could say zeugma is joined with syllepsis. Or the distinction between zeugma and syllepsis has lapsed now.

__________________________________________

[I would have pronounced it "TSOYG-ma"]

Other (non-original) examples, 50 years old at least (Thanks, Paul!):
"Are you going to New York or by bus?"
"Is it cooler in October or at the seashore?"

__________________________________________

ZEUGOMA - a German cheekbone

ZEUSMA - Rhea

ZENGMA - the inflexible principle of Enlightenment
Posted By: wofahulicodoc should Auld Acquaintance - 10/30/14 02:19 AM

SYNECDOCHE

PRONUNCIATION: (si-NEK-duh-kee)

MEANING: noun: A figure of speech in which a part stands for the whole or vice versa.
Examples: "head count" to refer to the count of people or "the police" to refer to a police officer

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin synekdoche, from Greek synekdokhe, from syn- (together) + ekdokhe (interpretation). Earliest documented use: 1397.

_______________________________________

SKYNECDOCHE - a small city in the Hudson River in New York State, just west of Albany; home to Union College

SYNECLOCHE - a special French churchbell that rings only on New Year's Eve
Posted By: wofahulicodoc now and again - 10/30/14 03:36 PM

EPANALEPSIS

PRONUNCIATION: (ep-uh-nuh-LEP-sis)

MEANING: noun: A figure of speech in which a word or phrase is repeated after intervening text. Example: "The king is dead, long live the king!"

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek epanalepsis, from epi- (upon) + ana- (back) + lepsis (taking hold). Earliest documented use: 1584.

USAGE: "What's it called if a word that appears at the beginning of a sentence is repeated at its end? Epanalepsis. Think of Brutus's speech at the funeral of Julius Caesar (in Shakespeare's revision, of course): 'Hear me for my cause, and be silent that you may hear: Believe me for mine honor, and have respect to mine honor, that you may believe.'" -- Bryan A. Garner; For the Word Lovers; ABA Journal (Chicago); May 2013.


_____________________________________


IPANALEPSIS - toothpaste used at the beginning of the day and at the end
Posted By: Tromboniator Clean sweep - 10/31/14 11:43 AM
EPANALENSIS: What the cinematographer does to capture entire vistas.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Clean sweep - 11/01/14 02:36 AM

HENDIADYS

PRONUNCIATION: (hen-DY-uh-dis)

MEANING: noun: A figure of speech in which two words joined by a conjunction are used to convey a single idea instead of using a word and its modifier.
Example: "pleasant and warm" instead of "pleasantly warm"

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin hendiadys, from Greek hen dia duoin (one by two). Earliest documented use: 1589.

_______________________________

HEN DIARYS - what we used to call gossipers' blogs

HENDI ANDYS - Jack-of-All-Trades
Posted By: Tromboniator Cooperation - 11/01/14 09:59 AM
HENDADYS: Rich roosters.
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Cooperation - 11/01/14 03:32 PM
HENDADDYS - roosters in the night time street corner trade.


(with a tip of the hat to Trom's word)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc not a fire-breathing-saurus - 11/03/14 05:17 PM

DRAGOMAN

PRONUNCIATION: (DRAG-uh-man)

MEANING: noun: An interpreter or guide.

ETYMOLOGY: From French dragoman, from Italian dragomanno, from Latin/Greek dragoumanos, from Arabic tarjuman, and Aramaic, from Akkadian targumanu (interpreter). Earliest documented use: 1300s. Akkadian is a now-extinct Semitic language once spoken in ancient Mesopotamia (now Iraq) and written in cuneiform. Earliest documented use: 14th century.

__________________________________

DRANOMAN - It's SuperPlumber!

DRAGONMAN - how to describe a long, tedious translation (two pronunciations)

DRACOMAN - Crabbe or Goyle's informal address to young Master Malfoy

DRAWOMAN - what Leonardo did with Mona Lisa
____________________________
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Bible stories - 11/04/14 02:02 PM

GOLGOTHA

PRONUNCIATION: (GOL-guh-thuh)

MEANING: noun:
1. A place or occasion of great suffering.
2. A burial place.

ETYMOLOGY: After Golgotha, the hill near Jerusalem believed to be the site of Jesus's crucifixion. From Latin, from Greek golgotha, from Aramaic gulgulta, from Hebrew gulgolet (skull). The hill was perhaps named from the resemblance of its shape to a skull. Earliest documented use: 1597.

________________________________


GOLGOTCHA - a cry of unexpected glee after a successful prank

GOLOTHA - rain-covering for one shoe, as described by a lisper

GOLGOTTA - the capital of West Bengal, and seventh-largest city in India (pop. about 4.5 million)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Clean sweep - 11/04/14 02:11 PM
Originally Posted By: Tromboniator
EPANALENSIS: What the cinematographer does to capture entire vistas.


...indeed 'e does !
Posted By: wofahulicodoc miraculous, according to Bela Bartok - 11/05/14 06:16 PM

MANDARIN

PRONUNCIATION: (MAN-duh-rin)

MEANING: noun:
1. A member of one of nine ranks of public officials in the Chinese Empire.
2. A powerful government official or bureaucrat.
3. A member of an elite group, especially one having influence in intellectual or literary circles.
4. Capitalized: the official language of China.
5. A citrus tree, Citrus reticulata, that is native to China.

adjective:
1. Of or relating to a mandarin.
2. Marked by refined or ornate language.

________________________________________

MACDARIN - Bobby, Scottish singer of popular songs in the 50s and after, including one notable one about MacHeath, the Knfe

MANDATIN' - Goin' around givin' orders, often without providin' funds to comply

MANNARIN - often used to determine a divorce settlement, to keep the "spouse in the mannarin which she has been accustomed"
Posted By: wofahulicodoc once every fifty years - 11/06/14 01:20 PM

JUBILEE

PRONUNCIATION: (JOO-buh-lee, -LEE)

MEANING: noun:
1. A special anniversary of an event, especially a 50th anniversary.
2. Rejoicing or celebration.

ETYMOLOGY: From Old French jubile, from Latin jubilaeus, and Greek iobelaios, from Hebrew yobel (ram, ram's horn trumpet). Traditionally a jubilee year was announced by blowing a ram's horn. Earliest documented use: 1382.

________________________________

BUBILEE - champagne

QUBILEE - what comes after P and before R, William
Posted By: Tromboniator Tyroically? - 11/07/14 12:15 AM
NUBILEE – The way a beginner does things.

MATA HARI

PRONUNCIATION: (MA-tuh HAR-ee, MAT-uh HAR-ee)

MEANING: noun: A seductive woman who works as a spy.

ETYMOLOGY: After exotic dancer Mata Hari, a stage name of Margaretha Geertruida Zelle (1876-1917). She was a Dutch woman, who took a Malay name, allegedly spied for the Germans, and was executed by the French. Her stage name Mata Hari means sun, literally "eye of the day", from Malay mata (eye) + hari (day, dawn). Earliest documented use: 1936.

_____________________________

MAMA HARI - the mother of all spies

MANA HARI - I'm late, I'm late,
For a very important date,
No time to say
Hello, Goodbye,
I'm late I'm late I'm late !
Posted By: Tromboniator Fig(ure) Newton - 11/07/14 09:19 PM
MATH HARI – This calculus problem is very difficult.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Glenn Campbell Strikes Again - 11/10/14 11:35 PM

TEGULAR

PRONUNCIATION: (TEG-yuh-luhr)

MEANING: adjective: Relating to, resembling, or arranged like tiles.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin tegula (tile), from tegere (to cover). Ultimately from the Indo-European root (s)teg- (to cover), which is also the source of thatch, deck, detect, tog, and protege. Earliest documented use: 1828.

_____________________________________


TEGULARK - this floor tiling pattern is for the birds!

STEGULAR - roofed with armor plate

TEQULAR - of or pertaining to a strong Mexican alcoholic beverage, distilled from blue Weber agave. Drinking too much of it will make you go blind. (...no "I"s)
Posted By: Tromboniator Also known as a Poohma - 11/11/14 08:07 AM
TIGULAR – A crossbreed found in the Hundred Acre Wood.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Crapped out again ! - 11/11/14 02:06 PM

(TIGULAR - gonna have to bounce that around for a while...)
________________________

Meantime:

REFECTION

PRONUNCIATION: (ri-FEK-shuhn)

MEANING: noun:
1. Refreshment with food or drink.
2. A light meal.
3. The reingesting of fecal pellets, as practiced by rabbits.

ETYMOLOGY: Via French from Latin reficere (to renew or restore), from re- (back) + facere (to make). Earliest documented use: 1398.

____________________________________


REFECTIO - Dumbledore causes a feast to spring forth on the tables at Hogwarts

REFICTION - publishing a Nero Wolfe mystery again but under a different name this time

REFECATION - Number Two, twice (be careful how you say this at your local racetrack betting window)
Posted By: Tromboniator A Toosday in Nuvemmer - 11/12/14 12:12 AM
RELECTION: What the incumment cannidate strives for.

Yeah, well, I have a fever today.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc thwarting is such sweet sorrow - 11/12/14 05:47 PM

FRUSTRANEOUS

PRONUNCIATION: (fruhs-TRAY-nee-uhs)

MEANING: adjective: Useless; unprofitable.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin frustra (in vain). Earliest documented use: 1643.

___________________________

FRUSTRANEOUS (the Identity transformation) - instant non-gratification
(alternatively FLUSTRANEOUS - throwing immediately into a tizzy)

FAUSTRANEOUS - having nothing at all to do with the man who bargained with the Devil

FRUITRANEOUS - our boxcars are full of apples and pears and oranges
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: thwarting is such sweet sorrow - 11/12/14 10:50 PM
FRUSTRAINEOUS: Can't get anything done when the sun doesn't shine.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: thwarting is such sweet sorrow - 11/13/14 02:52 PM

WONTED

PRONUNCIATION: (WON-tid)

MEANING: adjective: Usual; accustomed.

ETYMOLOGY: From Middle English woned, wont (accustomed), past participle of wonen (to be used to, dwell). Ultimately from the Indo-European root wen- (to desire or to strive for), which is also the source of wish, win, Venus, overweening, venerate, venison, and banyan, venial, and ween. Earliest documented use: 1408.

__________________________________

DONTED - instructed not to

WONTAD - take your job and shove it !

WONTEL - what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas
Posted By: wofahulicodoc and somehow still within ones ambit - 11/15/14 02:36 AM

AMBAGIOUS

PRONUNCIATION: (am-BAY-juhs)

MEANING: adjective: Roundabout; circuitous.

ETYMOLOGY: From Middle English ambages (equivocation), taken as a plural and the singular ambage coined from it. From Latin ambages, from ambi- (both, around) + agere (to drive). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ag- (to drive, draw, or move), which also gave us act, agent, agitate, litigate, synagogue, ambassador, agonistes, axiomatic, cogent, incogitant, exigent, exiguous, intransigent. Earliest documented use: 1656.

____________________________


AMBIGIOUS - what Shakespeare said Marc Antony said Brutus said Caesar was, sort of

AMEBAGIOUS - transmitted by a simple one-celled organism

SAMBAGIOUS - describing a South American dancer in the throes of ecstasy

GEMEINSCHAFT

PRONUNCIATION: (guh-MYN-shaft)

MEANING: noun: Social relations based on personal ties, affection, kinship, etc.

ETYMOLOGY: From German Gemeinschaft (community), from gemein (common) + -schaft (-ship). Earliest documented use: 1937.

NOTES: The counterpart of Gemeinschaft (community) is Gesellschaft (society), that is, social relation marked by impersonal ties, such as duty to society or to an organization.

_______________________________________


DEMEINSCHAFT - what sie bringen der Coal up to der Surface through

GEMINSCHAFT - twin axles

GEMEINSCHRAFFT - these are MY candies!
Posted By: wofahulicodoc better than strorry - 11/18/14 05:34 PM

STRAFE

PRONUNCIATION: (strayf)

MEANING:
verb tr.:
1. To attack with machine-gun fire or bombs from a low-flying aircraft.
2. To criticize severely.
noun:
1. An attack from a low-flying aircraft.
2. A severe criticism.

ETYMOLOGY: From the German slogan "Gott strafe England!" ([May] God punish England!) during WWI. From German strafen (to punish). Earliest documented use: 1915.

_________________________

STRIAFE - layers of iron

STRIFE - precursor of strafe

TRAFE - impure; not permitted
Posted By: wofahulicodoc that's five consecutive consonants... - 11/19/14 08:20 PM

GLEICHSCHALTUNG

PRONUNCIATION: (GLYK-shalt-toong)

MEANING: noun: The forced standardization of political, economic, and cultural institutions, as in an authoritarian state.

ETYMOLOGY: From German gleichschalten (to bring into line), from gleich (same) + schalten (to switch, turn). The term was used by the Nazi regime for totalitarian control. Earliest documented use: 1933.

________________________

GLEICHSCHALTING - put an end to this coerced uniformity !

GLEICHSCHALTUNA - a Collective with a deep-sea fishing boat

FLEICHSCHALTUNG - intercepted the meat delivery


Posted By: wofahulicodoc (no, that's NEXT week) - 11/19/14 08:26 PM

Let's just give thanks he doesn't try "Gedankenexperiment" as the target word!
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: (no, that's NEXT week) - 11/19/14 09:06 PM
You're very brave, wofa.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc lull-aby, aftr a [grizzly] fashion - 11/20/14 02:56 PM

SITZKRIEG

PRONUNCIATION: (SITS-kreeg)

MEANING: noun: A period of war marked by little or no active hostilities.

ETYMOLOGY: Modeled after German blitzkrieg, from sitzen (to sit) + Krieg (war). Earliest documented use: 1940.

NOTES: In Sep 1939, France and Britain declared war on Germany, but didn't launch a major ground offensive until the next year. This phase, from Sep 1939 to May 1940, came to be known as sitzkrieg or the sitting war. It has also been called by other names, such as the Phony War, the Twilight War, and the Bore War (a pun on Boer Wars). Sitzkrieg needs Sitzfleisch.

________________________________

SITZKLIEG - a spotlight so big you have to sit in a seat to use the controls (see AWAD June 2004, here )

SPITZKRIEG - spit-ball battle in der Gymnasium
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: lull-aby, aftr a [grizzly] fashion - 11/21/14 04:04 PM

LEITMOTIF or LEITMOTIV

PRONUNCIATION: (LYT-mo-teef)

MEANING: noun: A recurrent theme in a piece of music or literature, situation, etc.

ETYMOLOGY: From German Leitmotiv (lead motif), from leit- (leading) + Motiv (motive). Ultimately from the Indo-European root leit- (to go forth, to die), which also gave us lead, load, lode, and livelihood. Earliest documented use: 1937.

________________________________


NEITMOTIF - my recurring dreams are all recognizably similar

FLEITMOTIF - the airline is having an image makeover

LEIMOTIF - signature theme of the Hawaiian Islands

LEGITMOTIV - an alibi that stands up in court
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: lull-aby, aftr a [grizzly] fashion - 11/21/14 08:27 PM
LITMOTIF – A history of getting high.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc where are we? - 11/22/14 12:18 PM

(I toyed with KINDERGARTEN --> KINDERGARMEN - my GPS locater is more benevolent)
Posted By: LukeJavan8 - - - - Buffalo - 11/22/14 04:58 PM
SLEITMOTIV constant rain and then snow and lake effects
in Buffalo NY.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc next week is now this week - 11/24/14 02:02 AM

...so now for GEDANKENEXPERIMENT we can have

GEDANKE-EXPERIMENT - Let's have a community meal, both our colony and the indigenous folk, to show appreciation for our good fortune and our good harvest - and see if anything comes of it
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Said Woody Guthrie, - 11/24/14 11:36 PM

SOLON
And then he added, "It's been good to know ya!"

PRONUNCIATION: (SOH-luhn)

MEANING: noun:
1. A wise lawgiver.
2. A legislator.

ETYMOLOGY: After Solon (c. 638-558 BCE), an Athenian lawmaker who introduced political, economic, and moral reforms and revised the harsh code of laws established by Draco. Earliest documented use: 1631.

_________________________________________

NOLON - the Emperor's new hose

SOLOS - a set of Crab Canons for unaccompanied Achilles. They sound the same played forwards or backwards.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Said Woody Guthrie, - 11/25/14 05:43 PM

MAZARINE

PRONUNCIATION: (maz-uh-REEN, MAZ-uh-reen, -rin)

MEANING: adjective: A deep, rich shade of blue.

ETYMOLOGY: After either Cardinal Jules Mazarin (1602-1661) or his niece, Duchess Hortense Mancini (1646-1699). Why this color is associated with them is not entirely clear. Earliest documented use: 1684

________________________________

MIZARINE - hiding inportant details in plain sight. After Mizar, the second star from the end of the Big Dipper's handle...which is (if your vision is good enough) a double star

MANZARINE - like an apple

MAZANINE - where Ma sits when she goes to the movies
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: Said Woody Guthrie, - 11/25/14 10:39 PM
MAMARINE – What you might become after a stint at Paparris Island.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Said Woody Guthrie, - 11/26/14 07:15 PM

PLATONIC

PRONUNCIATION: (pluh-TON-ik, play-)

MEANING: adjective:
1. Relating to Plato or his ideas.
2. Relating to a love free of sensual desire.
3. Confined to words or theories, and not leading to action.

ETYMOLOGY: After Greek philosopher Plato (c. 400 BCE). Earliest documented use: 1533.

_____________________________

PELATONIC - undistinguished, lost amidst the throngs of the mediocre; see pelaton as used by bicyclists

PLUTONIC - the ultimate loss of status, as in being demoted from the smallest and slowest and coldest of a set of nine, to being thrown out of the group entirely...
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Said Woody Guthrie, - 11/26/14 07:50 PM
Originally Posted By: Tromboniator
MAMARINE – What you might become after a stint at Paparris Island.

smile

oughta be a way of working "paparazzi" in there too, somehow...
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Said Woody Guthrie, - 11/28/14 02:20 AM

TONTINE

PRONUNCIATION: (TON-teen, ton-TEEN)

MEANING: noun: A form of investment in which participants pool their money into a common fund and receive an annuity. Each person's share increases as members die until the last survivor takes the whole.

ETYMOLOGY: From French tontine. Named after Lorenzo Tonti, a Neapolitan banker, who started the scheme in France. Earliest documented use: 1765.

NOTES: A tontine was also used a way to raise money for the state, often for fighting wars, as the fund went to the crown after the last person died. Crown funding via crowdfunding. As there was a perverse incentive to hasten the demise of other members of a tontine to increase one's share, eventually it was made illegal. Tontine has been used as a plot device in many works of fiction

_______________________________

TINTINE - a naive whose adventures were chronicled first in French comic strips and more recently a movie. Any wealth she garnered during her escapades went toward the wellbeing of her out-of-wedlock daughter, poignantly described by Victor Hugo
Posted By: wofahulicodoc In München steht... - 11/28/14 11:17 PM

MALTHUSIAN

PRONUNCIATION: (mal-THOO-zhuhn, -zee-uhn)

MEANING: adjective: Relating to the view that population increases faster than its means of subsistence resulting in disaster, unless population is checked by natural calamities or by people exercising control and having fewer children.

ETYMOLOGY: After economist and clergyman Thomas Robert Malthus (1766-1834), a proponent of this idea. Earliest documented use: 1805.

_________________________________

MALT-HAUS-IAN - of or pertaining to a Bavarian brewery
Posted By: wofahulicodoc getting to the heart of the matter - 12/02/14 02:55 AM

CORDATE

PRONUNCIATION: (KOR-dayt)

MEANING: adjective: Heart-shaped.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin cor (heart). Ultimately from the Indo-European root kerd- (heart), which also gave us cardiac, cordial, courage, record, concord, discord, and accord. Earliest documented use: 1651.

__________________________________

From the sublime to the ridiculous:

CORDANTE (1) - the theme of The Divine Comedy

CORDARTE - Cupid's Arrow

CORDATA - EKG, echocardiogram, stuff like that

CORDANTE (2) - playing your heart out at the poker table

SCORDATE - So, how'd it go last weekend?
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Archie Goodwin demurs - 12/03/14 02:55 AM

AMANUENSIS

PRONUNCIATION: (uh-man-yoo-EN-sis)

MEANING: noun: A person employed to take dictation or to copy manuscripts.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin servus a manu (slave at hand[writing]), from manus (hand). Ultimately from the Indo-European root man- (hand), which also gave us manual, manage, maintain, manicure, maneuver, manufacture, manuscript, command, manque, legerdemain, manumit, and mortmain. Earliest documented use: 1619.

_____________________________________


WAMANUENSIS - Would you believe there was a time when the very thought of a female taking dictation or copying manuscripts could be the subject of feeble attempts at humor?!

AMANUNSIS - proud declaration to her sibling, by a pious novice home from the Convent for the first time
Posted By: Tromboniator Yakking - 12/03/14 09:05 AM
LAMANUENSIS – Tibetan steno.

Yes, time to revisit Archie's archives.
Posted By: Tromboniator Where'll I put my bongos? - 12/03/14 11:02 PM
IMPEDIMENTA

PRONUNCIATION: (im-ped-uh-MEN-tuh)

MEANING: plural noun: Baggage, supplies, or equipment related to an activity or expedition, especially when regarded as slowing one's progress.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin, plural of impedimentum, from impedire (to impede), from im-/in- (in) + ped- (foot). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ped- (foot) which also gave us pedal, podium, octopus, impeach, antipodal, expediency, peccadillo (alluding to a stumble or fall), impeccable, and peccavi. Earliest documented use: 1600.

____________________________________

IMPADIMENTA – Your apartment is really full of stuff, man.

IMPENIMENTA – Writer's block.

Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Where'll I put my bongos? - 12/03/14 11:19 PM
IMPODIMENTA - over stuffed space capsule.
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: Where'll I put my bongos? - 12/03/14 11:38 PM
IMMEDIMENTA – Right now, and I'm not kidding!
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Where'll I put my bongos? - 12/04/14 02:28 AM

IMPERIMENTA - you MUST think thusly

IMPEDIRENTA - You thought you could lease this apartment? Sorry, no Irish need apply

SPLEEN

PRONUNCIATION: (spleen)

MEANING: noun:
1. An abdominal organ serving to clean blood.
2. Bad temper.

ETYMOLOGY: From French esplen, from Latin splen, from Greek splen. Earliest documented use: 1300.

NOTES: In earlier times it was believed that four humors controlled human behavior and an imbalance resulted in disease. According to this thinking, an excess of black bile secreted by the spleen resulted in melancholy or ill humor. Also, spleen was considered to be the seat of emotions. To vent one's spleen was to vent one's anger.
_______________________________

an excess of black bile...resulted in melancholy

An interesting thought, that, since "melancholy" is exactly the Greek translation of "black bile:" melan- as in melanin or melanoma, and chole- as in cholecystitis = bile-sac-inflammation, i.e. of the gall bladder, which stores bile. Too much bile was also thought to cause cholera.
________________________________


Be all that as it may -

SCLEEN - Arright, you can stop scrubbing it now

SPLAEN, pronounced "splane" -
1. verb: to make clear, as in "You don't have to splaen it to me any more..."
2. adjective: clear, as in "...It's splaen as day now!"

MANSUETUDE

PRONUNCIATION: (MAN-swi-tood, -tyood)

MEANING: noun: Gentleness; meekness.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin mansuescere (to make tame: to accustom to handling), from manus (hand) + suescere (to become accustomed). Ultimately from the Indo-European root man- (hand), which is also the source of manual, manage, maintain, manicure, maneuver, manufacture, manuscript, command, manque, amanuensis, legerdemain, and mortmain

____________________________

MARSUETUDE - oxymoron: a meek god of war

MANSUEDUDE - one guy takes another guy to court

MANSETUDE - it's not just a house, it's a whole estate
MANSUETUBE=death-defying slide in a water park

JUGGERNAUT

PRONUNCIATION: (JUG-uhr-not)

MEANING: noun:
1. Anything requiring blind sacrifice.
2. A massive relentless force, person, institution, etc. that crushes everything in its path.

ETYMOLOGY: From Hindi jagannath (one of the titles Krishna, a Hindu god, has), from Sanskrit jagannath, from jagat (world) + nath (lord). A procession of Jagannath takes place each year at Puri, India. Devotees pull a huge cart carrying the deity. Some have been accidentally crushed under the wheels (or are said to have thrown themselves under them). Earliest documented use: 1638.

______________________________________

JUGGLERNAUT - an entertainer who throws Indian clubs into the air and catches them again, all the while riding on a surfboard

JUGGERNUT - a fantastically devoted wind instrument player from the Ozarks

JUDGERNAUT - Prithee, do not impose your values upon that woman; she is not worthless.
Posted By: Tromboniator Cousteauicism? - 12/09/14 05:50 AM
HUGGERNAUT - Fervid marine environmentalist, sometimes called a kelp-hugger.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Cousteauicism? - 12/10/14 03:10 AM

KLATSCH

PRONUNCIATION: (klach, klahch)

MEANING: noun: A casual gathering of people for conversation, etc.

ETYMOLOGY: From German Klatsch (gossip). Earliest documented use: 1953. Also see kaffeeklatsch.

________________________


KLEATSCH - worn on your shoes for better traction, after your teeth are knocked out

KLUTSCH - what you use to shift gears when you drive for the Keystone Kops
Posted By: wofahulicodoc a one-I IRIC - 12/10/14 09:30 PM

ONEIRIC

PRONUNCIATION: (oh-NY-rik)

MEANING: adjective: Of or relating to dreams; dreamy.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek oneiros (dream). Earliest documented use: 1859.

________________________________

ONEILIC - like the guy who wrote Long Day's Journey Into Night and other plays

ONEIDIC - pertaining to a New York Indian tribe, part of the Iroquois confederacy (or Kanonsionni in their own language)

ONEIRIS - a very small Spring garden

Posted By: Tromboniator Re: a one-I IRIC - 12/10/14 10:00 PM
UNEIRIC – having nothing to do with the ancestral home of the guy who wrote Long Day's Journey Into Night.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc HIPAA Strikes Again - 12/12/14 03:06 AM

SCANDENT

PRONUNCIATION: (SKAN-duhnt)

MEANING: adjective: Climbing or ascending.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin scandere (to climb). Ultimately from the Indo-European root skand- (to leap or climb), which also gave us ascend, descend, condescend, transcend, echelon, and scale. Earliest documented use: 1682.

_______________________________

SCARDENT - poignant reminder of a long-ago duel between two men who loved the same fair maid

SANDENT - what you do before you patch it

SCANDONT - Regulations pertaining to Protected Health Information preclude our copying the Outside Hospital report into your Electronic Medical Record here
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Mensopause III - 12/12/14 05:51 PM

ZYMOLOGY

PRONUNCIATION: (zy-MOL-uh-jee)

MEANING: noun: The science of fermentation.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek zym- (ferment) + -logy (science, study). Earliest documented use: 1753.

_________________________

AZYMOLOGY - the study of the works of Isaac Asimov, who in 1953 described in The Caves of Steel feeding the burgeoning world population with a yeast-based food he called "zymoveal"


ZYMOOGY - a fermented beverage made from cows' milk
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Mensopause III - 12/12/14 05:59 PM
ZYMOOLOGY-akin to zymoogy, the science of milking cows before
fermenting it.
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: Mensopause III - 12/13/14 09:48 AM
ZYGOLOGY – the study of the mind and behavior of a newly-fertilized egg.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc not as bad as a snowball's chance - 12/16/14 02:50 AM

DOG'S CHANCE

PRONUNCIATION: (DOGZ chans)

MEANING: noun: A poor chance.

ETYMOLOGY: In modern times dogs may be pampered, but historically a dog's life wasn't much to bark about. Hence a dog's chance is a small chance. Earliest documented use: 1890.

_______________________________


DOG'S CHANCRE - the French Poodle has a venereal disease (though in Paris they would say the English Bulldog has a venereal disease)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Just as bad as a snowball's chance - 12/17/14 02:59 AM

GENTLEMEN'S AGREEMENT

PRONUNCIATION: (JEN-tl-manz uh-GREE-muhnt)

MEANING: noun: An agreement that's based on honor and not legally binding.

ETYMOLOGY: From the idea that a gentleman (a civilized man of good standing) will honor an agreement he has entered. Earliest documented use: 1821.

________________________________

De-emphasized by Anu is that the agreement often involved the unspoken understanding that you would not sell your house, or admit into your club, or whatever other activity you wanted to keep exclusive, any Jew, or Negro, or Catholic, or whatever other group you preferred not to associate with. The theme was explored at some length in the 1947 novel and movie by that name. See here.

_________________________________

GENTLEMEN'S ARGUMENT

PRONUNCIATION: (JEN-tl-manz uh-GREE-muhnt)

MEANING: noun: A disagreement that's based on honor and not legally binding.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc just stringing us along - 12/18/14 02:02 AM

CAT'S CRADLE

PRONUNCIATION: (kats kraydl)

MEANING: noun:
1. A children's game in which a string is wrapped around one player's hands in complex symmetrical patterns and transferred to another player's hands to form a different pattern. (video)
2. Something elaborate or intricate, especially when without an apparent purpose.

ETYMOLOGY: Of uncertain origin. Earliest documented use: 1768.

______________________________________


CAST'S CRADLE - where the actors take their power nap

Posted By: Tromboniator it's rigged! - 12/18/14 12:18 PM
CAW'S CRADLE - crow's nest.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc It's Greek to me ! - 12/19/14 03:20 AM

WHO'S WHO

PRONUNCIATION: (hooz hoo)

MEANING: noun
1. A reference work containing concise biographical sketches of well-known people.
2. Well-known people in a particular profession, region, etc.

ETYMOLOGY: The first Who's Who was published in the UK in 1849. Now the term is in wider use and there are thousands of specialized Who's Whos publications, for high school students, for Nebraskans, and for the dead (Who Was Who). There's even a Who's Who in Hell. Earliest documented use of the generic use of the term is from 1917.
________________________________


WHO'S WHOM - a compendium of pseudo-intellectuals, like the lady in Sinclair Lewis' Main Street who referred to the common folk as "wa pollwa" because she had once read the term "hoi polloi" and thought it was French
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: It's Greek to me ! - 12/19/14 09:19 AM
WHO'S WHOA - The question that gives rise to the answer, "Whoa is me!"
Posted By: wofahulicodoc It's still Greek to me ! - 12/19/14 12:08 PM

LION'S SHARE

PRONUNCIATION: (LY-uhnz shair)

MEANING: noun: The largest part of something.

ETYMOLOGY: From the Aesop's fable in which the lion claimed all of the spoils instead of sharing with other animals who took part in the hunt. Earliest documented use: 1790.

_________________________________

LION'S SHARP - claws

ILION'S SHARE - the spoils of the Trojan war
Posted By: wofahulicodoc preferably not in his trigger finger - 12/22/14 05:13 PM

OPTICS

PRONUNCIATION: (OP-tiks)

MEANING: noun:
1. The study of light, vision, etc.
2. The way a situation or action is perceived by the public.

ETYMOLOGY: From French optique, from Latin opticus, from Greek optikos, from ops (eye). Earliest documented use: 1579; for sense 2: 1973.

__________________________

COPTICS - the policeman has twitches

OPTIES - Trompe l'Oeil cravats

IOPTICS - what your smartphone uses to take pictures

EPICENTER

PRONUNCIATION: (EP-i-sen-tuhr)

MEANING: noun:
1. The point on the earth’s surface directly above the focus of an earthquake.
2. The center or focal point of an activity or event, especially something unpleasant.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin epicentrum, from Greek epikentros, from epi- (upon) + kentron (needle, pivot point for drawing a circle). Earliest documented use: 1887.

___________________________

EPICINTER - they buried the last copy of The Ten Comandments (starring Yul Brynner and Charlton Heston)

ERICENTER - Mr Idle comes onstage

SPICENTER - where to satisfy all your condiment needs
Posted By: wofahulicodoc {fap}, all of them - 12/24/14 12:38 PM

QUANTUM

PRONUNCIATION (KWAHN-tuhm)

MEANING: noun:
1. A quantity or amount.
2. A portion.
3. A large amount.
4. The smallest amount of something that can exist independently.

adjective:
1. Large.
2. Relating to the quantum theory.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin quantus (how much or how great). In physics, a quantum jump or quantum leap is usually a small change, while in popular usage the term is used to mean a significant change. Earliest documented use: 1567.

_______________________________

QUANTUS - the Australian airline, which speciaizes in carrying passengers who are afraid of flying (the airline's motto is Quantus Tremor est Futuris ("There Will Be Much Fear and Trembling")

QUALTUM - the description or characteristics of something, down to the teeniest detail possible

QUINTUM - the fifth part of something
Posted By: Tromboniator Very nice, Dearie. - 12/25/14 03:45 AM
QUAINTUM - Fundamental amount of old-fashioned attractiveness. The five-quaintum restaurant has all the charm of Grandma's kitchen.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Very nice, Dearie. - 12/25/14 04:41 PM

THEORY

PRONUNCIATION: (THEE-uh-ree, THEER-ee)

MEANING: noun:
1. A set of propositions used to explain some aspect of the natural world, one that has been repeatedly tested and confirmed and widely accepted. For example, Einstein’s theory of relativity or Darwin’s Theory of Evolution.
2. The body of principles belonging to a field. For example, music theory.
3. A speculation.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin theoria, from Greek theoria (contemplation), from theoros (spectator), from theorein (to consider, look at), which also gave us theorem and theater. Earliest documented use: 1597.

_________________________________


THEERY - belief that it's all about you (compare OTHERY, the belief that it's all about them)

SHEORY - after I've consumed enough of it, my speech impediment doesn't bother me so much

THE WORY - concern that some new observation may show your favorite hypothesis to be incomplete, or (worse yet) wrong
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: Very nice, Dearie. - 12/25/14 11:13 PM
THEORO - A set of propositions used to explain some aspect of Walden Pond.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc or maybe... - 12/26/14 12:27 AM

Originally Posted By: Tromboniator
THEORO - A set of propositions used to explain some aspect of Walden Pond.
2. The goal of the Spanish colonization of the New World
Posted By: wofahulicodoc chaos absolute - 12/27/14 01:03 AM

ENTROPY

PRONUNCIATION: (EN-truh-pee)

MEANING: noun:
1. A measure of the disorder in a system.
2. The natural tendency of things to decline into disorder.
3. Disorder, randomness, or chaos.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek en- (in) + trope (transformation). Ultimately from the Indo-European root trep- (to turn), which also gave us troubadour, tropic, contrive, and tropism. Earliest documented use: 1868.

________________________________

TENTROPY - too many dang lines holding down the teepee

ENGROPY - tending to scratch oneself in public

ZENTROPY - the ultimate prize for world-class nirvana
Posted By: wofahulicodoc the best defense: a good offense - 12/30/14 02:59 AM

PREBUTTAL

PRONUNCIATION: (pri-BUH-tl)

MEANING: noun: An argument in anticipation of a criticism; a preemptive rebuttal.

ETYMOLOGY: A blend of pre- + rebuttal, from rebut (to refute), from Old French rebouter (to push back), from boute (to push). Ultimately from the Indo-European root bhau- (to strike), which also gave us refute, beat, button, halibut, and buttress. Earliest documented use: 1996.

_______________________________


PREPUTTAL - the routine of estimating the slope, testing the wind, kneeling, analyzing the grass, picking out the pebbles, standing up again, lining up the stroke, shushing the crowd, all before poking a piece of gutta-percha into a hole in the ground

PREBUTAL - the new barbiturate headache preventer

PUREBUTTAL - nothing but B------t
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: the best defense: a good offense - 12/30/14 09:30 AM
PREBUNTAL: descriptive of the preparatory moves and stance prior to hitting a baseball an unexpectedly short distance.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Now where's my samovar? - 12/30/14 04:09 PM

CAPTCHA

PRONUNCIATION: (KAP-chuh)

MEANING: noun: A test used to make sure that a human is using a system, not a computer program. The test typically involves reading distorted text.

ETYMOLOGY: An acronym of Completely Automated Public Turing Test to tell Computers and Humans Apart. The Turing test is named after Alan Turing, a mathematician and computer scientist, who proposed that a computer could be considered intelligent if, while interacting with a human and a computer, someone could not tell which is which. A captcha is a kind of reverse Turing test. Earliest documented use: 2001.

__________________________________

CAPTCHAT - a web-based Bulletin-Board for high-ranking naval officers

CAPECHA - a hybrid Flamenco/Caribbean dance

CAPTCHAI - a very small amount of Russian tea with milk and sugar and spices (or, depending on usage, the the maximum allowed amount)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Y'all all pitch in, now - 12/31/14 08:38 PM

CROWDSOURCE

PRONUNCIATION: (KROUD-sohrs)

MEANING: verb tr.: To enlist the services of a large number of people outside the company, for little or no pay, to accomplish a task.

ETYMOLOGY: A blend of crowd + outsource. Earliest documented use: 2006.

___________________________

CROWSOURCE - Why, crow's eggs, of course !
CROWEDSOURCE - Sunrise [Same joke. Funny-once. Sorry.]

CROWDSCOURSE
1. The mob went thataway
2. Public links
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Has anybody seen my girl? - 01/01/15 07:23 PM

GOOGLE

PRONUNCIATION: (GOOG-uhl)

MEANING: verb tr., intr.: To search for information online using a search engine, especially Google.

ETYMOLOGY: From the search engine Google. Earliest documented use: 1998.

_________________________


GORGLE - a small chasm

GROGLE - a wee drop o' rum for your thirsty Able-Bodied Seaman

GOOGIE - ...but GOOGIE love, GOOGIE woo, GOOGIE GOOGIE GOOGIE coo, Has anybody seen my girl?
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: Has anybody seen my girl? - 01/01/15 11:16 PM
POOGLE: A curly-coated dog that can find ANYTHING.
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Has anybody seen my girl? - 01/02/15 01:13 AM
GURGLE - to use Listerine or Scope
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Has anybody seen my girl? - 01/03/15 02:11 AM

ANTHROPOCENE

PRONUNCIATION: (AN-thruh-puh-seen)

MEANING: noun: The geological period marked by a significant human impact on climate and the environment.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek anthropo- (human) + -cene (denoting a geological period), from Greek kainos (new). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ken (fresh, new, or young) which also gave us recent and Sanskrit kanya (young girl). Earliest documented use: 2000.

_________________________________

ANTHROPOGENE - that bit of DNA that makes a human human

ARTHROPOCENE - the Age of Insects, post-apocalypse

ANTIROPOCENE - We don't want to see the likes of you hanging around here, or, No noose is good noose

Posted By: wofahulicodoc No fair... - 01/06/15 02:51 AM

BILDUNGSROMAN

PRONUNCIATION: (BIL-doongz-roh-mahn, -doongks-)

MEANING: noun: A novel concerned with the maturing of someone from childhood to adulthood.
Example: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain.

ETYMOLOGY: From German, from Bildung (education, formation) + Roman (novel), from French roman (novel). Earliest documented use: 1910.

_______________________________

BUILDUNGSROMAN - Handbuch of Classical Architecture

BILDUNGSROMANY - Go West, young Gypsy, and grow up with your country

BIDDUNGSROMAN - Use the Italian System to Reach Your Best Contract and Play Championship Bridge !

Posted By: Tromboniator Re: No fair... - 01/06/15 03:21 AM
MILDUNGSROMAN: The biography of an Italian fungus.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: No fair... - 01/06/15 04:50 PM

LONGUEUR

PRONUNCIATION: (long-GUHR)

MEANING: noun: A long and dull passage in a work of literature.

ETYMOLOGY: From French longueur (length), from Latin longus (long). Ultimately from the Indo-European root del- (long), which also gave us lounge, lunge, linger, longitude, long, belong, and along. Earliest documented use: 1791.

___________________________________

LONGUEUE - World's Longest Pigtail

TONGUEUR - an adept trumpet-player (Honi soit qui mal y pense)

LONQUEUR - a very tall glass of cognac
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: No fair... - 01/07/15 03:17 AM
BONGUEUR: The person who supplies, owns, or starts the water pipe.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: No fair... - 01/07/15 11:57 AM
Originally Posted By: Tromboniator
BONGUEUR: The person who supplies, owns, or starts the water pipe.

Good to know; I had thought it might be a poorly-enunciated French greeting.
(also called, "Becasue the author said so, that's why...")
_________________________________________________

PERIPETIA or PERIPETEIA

PRONUNCIATION: (per-uh-puh-TEE-uh, -TIE-uh)

MEANING: noun: A sudden or unexpected change of fortune, especially in a literary work. A classic example is Oedipus learning about his parentage.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek peripiptein (to change suddenly), from peri- (near, around) + piptein (to fall). Ultimately from the Indo-European root pet- (to rush or fly), which also gave us feather, petition, compete, perpetual, pterodactyl, helicopter, pterodactyl, propitious, pinnate, pteridology (study of ferns), lepidopterology (study of butterflies and moths), pencel (flag at the end of a lance), and impetuous. Earliest documented use: 1591.

___________________________

PERIPETELA - around the kneecap

HERIPETIA - whatever you say, he'll say it again right afterwards

EERIPETIA - the Hound of the Baskervilles, right!
Posted By: wofahulicodoc I can see clearly now - 01/08/15 01:41 PM

LOCUS CLASSICUS

PRONUNCIATION: (LO-kuhs KLAS-i-kuhs)

MEANING: noun: An authoritative and often quoted passage from a book.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin locus (place) + classicus (classical, belonging to the first or highest class). Earliest documented use: 1853.

________________________________

FOCUS CLASSICUS - see biconvex lens

LOCUS GLASSICUS - Murano, Venice, Italy

LOCUST CLASSICUS - grasshopper (common or garden variety...in the presence of population pressure)
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: I can see clearly now - 01/08/15 11:08 PM
LOCUS CLASTICUS – The old prison yard.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: I can see clearly now - 01/09/15 02:30 AM

I would have thought SCLASTICUS would be the schoolyard ?
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: I can see clearly now - 01/09/15 03:24 AM
Breakin' rocks in the hot sun;
I fought the law and the law won.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Recycle ! - 01/09/15 02:52 PM
Ah. LOCUS CLASHICUS.
____________________________


LITTERATEUR

PRONUNCIATION: (lit-uhr-uh-TUR, lit-ruh-)

MEANING: noun: An author of literary or critical works.

ETYMOLOGY: From French littérateur, from Latin litterator (teacher of letters, grammarian, critic), from litterae (letters, literature), from littera (letter). Earliest documented use: 1806.

_______________________________

LITTERATOUR - See the junkyards of the world!

LITTERANTEUR - Templeton, the rat from Charlotte's Web for whom "a Fair is a veritable smorgasbord." Portmanteau word, from "litter" and "restauranteur."

LISTERATEUR - shared a combined Nobel Prize in Medicine for their work on germ theory and antisepsis. (Or would have, if there had been a Nobel Prize when they were active)
_________________________________

Strange how many of this week's words are of European origin. English for all its richness is not yet the language of the Arts...
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Fiat Lux - 01/12/15 05:33 PM

APRICATE

PRONUNCIATION: (AP-ri-kayt)

MEANING:
verb intr.: To bask in the sun.
verb tr.: To expose to the sun.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin apricari (to bask in the sun). Earliest documented use: 1691. Despite a similar spelling, the word apricot has a different origin. It’s from Latin praecox (early-ripening).

_________________________

CAPRICATE - to turn into a goat

AGRICATE - to combine a whole bunch of little worthless swamps into one large farm

APRILATE - May
Posted By: LukeJavan8 - - - -mouth agape - 01/12/15 05:37 PM
GAPRICATE- to stare at
Posted By: wofahulicodoc no, not vinegary - 01/13/15 02:15 PM

ASCESIS

PRONUNCIATION: (uh-SEES-is)

MEANING: noun: The practice of severe self-discipline or self-control. Also spelled as askesis.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek askesis (exercise or training), from askein (to exercise or work). Earliest documented use: 1873.

__________________________________


ASCESS - availability for the orthographically challenged

ASCRESIS - 1. needs ironing; 2. how rich is he?

ASCENSIS - the population is going up
Posted By: wofahulicodoc So why do we call a week a "sennight"? - 01/14/15 04:42 PM

SENARY

PRONUNCIATION: (SEN-uh-ree)

MEANING: adjective:
1. Relating to the number six.
2. Having sixth rank.
3. Having six parts or things.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin senarius (consisting of six). Ultimately from the Indo-European root s(w)eks (six), which also gave us semester, siesta, and Sistine (named after Pope Sixtus IV). Earliest documented use: 1661

____________________________


SENARMY - Who are all those guys marching this way with swords and armor?

SENALY - what you'll need at your side to help you fight them off

SEA NARY - where and when you'll find me in my fresh-water boat
Posted By: wofahulicodoc pica ? - 01/16/15 01:42 AM

ARENICOLOUS

PRONUNCIATION: (ar-uh-NIK-uh-luhs)

MEANING: adjective: Living, growing, or burrowing in sand.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin harena/arena (sand) + colere (to inhabit). Earliest documented use: 1851.

_________________________


ARENICOLONS - the lower intestines of people who ingest too much sand

DARENICOLOUS - to defy Santa Claus

ARSENICOLOUS - having eaten small doses of poison often enough to become tolerant of it


PREGUSTATOR

PRONUNCIATION: (pri-guh-STAY-tuhr)

MEANING: noun: A person whose job is to taste food or drink before it’s served.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin pre- (before) + gustare (to taste). Ultimately from the Indo-European root geus- (to taste or choose), which also gave us choice, choose, gusto, ragout, and disgust. Earliest documented use: 1670.

___________________________

PREGUSTAMOR - Love At Sea, until the wind hits

PREGUESTATOR - the one who cleans the house before the party starts

PYREGUSTATOR - person who arranges the fiery public celebration of a death
PREBUSTATOR – The spud one eats just before leaving for school.

Good. I would have come up with "plastic surgeon's assessment prior to augmentation mammoplasty" or something; yours is more complete..
You just have to get out more. grin
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Ne plus ultra - 01/19/15 04:04 PM

ULTRACREPIDARIAN

PRONUNCIATION: (uhl-truh-krep-i-DAYR-ee-uhn)

MEANING: adjective: Giving opinions beyond one’s area of expertise.
noun: One who gives opinions beyond one’s area of expertise.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin ultra (beyond) + crepidarius (shoemaker), from crepida (sandal). Earliest documented use: 1819.

NOTES: The story goes that in ancient Greece there was a renowned painter named Apelles who used to display his paintings and hide behind them to listen to the comments. Once a cobbler pointed out that the sole of the shoe was not painted correctly. Apelles fixed it and encouraged by this the cobbler began offering comments about other parts of the painting. At this point the painter cut him off with “Ne sutor ultra crepidam” meaning “Shoemaker, not above the sandal” or one should stick to one’s area of expertise.

________________________________


ULTRACREPITARIAN - old and crinkly

YULTRACREPIDARIAN - the shoes worn by the King of Siam

ULTRACREEPIDARIAN - New York City rush-hour traffic

________________________________

And why, if I may be so bold, is the Greek painter of the story speaking to the Greek cobbler in Latin?
Posted By: wofahulicodoc ...but it doesn't diminish my glory - 01/21/15 02:29 AM

MYTHOMANE

PRONUNCIATION: (MITH-uh-mayn)

MEANING:
noun: One having a tendency to exaggerate or lie.
adjective: Having a tendency to exaggerate or lie.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek mythos (myth) + -mania (excessive enthusiasm or craze). Earliest documented use: 1954.

_____________________________________

[Why do I keep trying to pronounce that " mith-OM-in-ee" ?? ]
___________________________________


MYTHOMiNE - a lisper's love song to his girlfriend

MYTHOMAINE - any of several Tall Stories about a stereotypical taciturn, sardonic, dry-humored inhabitant of the North-Eeasternmost U.S. state. Typical of the genre is
-- Texan, tryng to impress visiting Maine resident: My ranch is...well, let's just say I can get in my truck and drive all day, and all night, and all the next day, and still be on my own land.
-- Our Hero: Ayup. I used to have a truck like that, too.

Posted By: Tromboniator Re: ...but it doesn't diminish my glory - 01/21/15 09:43 AM
MYTHOMALE - 1. Mine's bigger. 2. I'm smarter than she is.
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: ...but it doesn't diminish my glory - 01/21/15 04:52 PM
MYTHOMOLE - The "abominable snowman-like" mole in my back
yard. Must be a gopher. His tracks are virtual mounds of epic
proportions, now frozen and I trip over them.

LIBERTINE

PRONUNCIATION: (LIB-uhr-teen)

MEANING:
noun: A person who is morally unrestrained.
adjective: Unrestrained by conventions or morality.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin libertinus (freedman), from liber (free). Ultimately from the Indo-European root leudh- (to mount up or grow), which also gave us liberty, livery, and deliver. Earliest documented use: 1384.


__________________________________

GLIBERTINE - a smooth-talking Don Juan

LIBORTINE - playing fast and loose with currency transactions

LABORTINE - the ultimate status of a pregnant adolescent (compare ABORTINE, a formerly-pregnant adolescent)

Posted By: Tromboniator Re: ...but it doesn't diminish my glory - 01/22/15 04:57 AM
LIMBERTINE – A person who is morally unrestrained in any position.

HOMUNCULUS

PRONUNCIATION: (huh-MUHNG-kyuh-luhs, HO-)

MEANING: noun:
1. A diminutive human being.
2. A fully formed, miniature human being that was earlier believed to be present in a sperm or an egg.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin homunculus (little man), diminutive of ho-mo* (man). Ultimately from the Indo-European root dhghem- (earth), which also gave us allochthonous, autochthonous, chameleonic, chthonic, disinter, and inhume. Earliest documented use: 1656.
_____________________________

ROMUNCULUS - a tiny model of an Italian city on the Tiber river, small enough to build in a day

_____________________________


And as an aside - does anyone else find it strange that in Latin, to go from "-US" to "-I" is to change from singular to plural, but in English "US" to "I" changes plural to singular?
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: ...but it doesn't diminish my glory - 01/23/15 05:49 AM
HEMUNCULUS - A miniskirt.

HUMUNCULUS - Vastly, immensely small

Quote:
does anyone else find it strange that in Latin, to go from "-US" to "-I" is to change from singular to plural, but in English "US" to "I" changes plural to singular?


Now I do!
Posted By: wofahulicodoc now THAT'S a real stretch... - 01/23/15 06:00 PM

Maybe we should invoke the mathematical-logic concept that "-" means "not". Then we can say that -I means "not I", and -US means "not US", and we've changed singular to plural and vice versa...so the equivalency to Latin is restored.

Or something. wink

VACUOUS

PRONUNCIATION: (VAK-yoo-uhs)

MEANING: adjective: Lacking ideas or intelligence.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin vacuus (empty). Earliest documented use: 1651.
_________________________________

VACUONS - subatomic particles with no charge, no spin, no mass, no velocity, no momentum, and taking up no space whatsoever

EVACUOUS - cathartic


VAPUOUS – Full of the effluent of e-cigarettes.

I've tipped my hat to Isaac on many occasions.

SCURVY

PRONUNCIATION: (SKUHR-vee)

MEANING:
adjective: Mean or contemptible.
noun: A disease caused by vitamin C deficiency, characterized by swollen and bleeding gums, bleeding under the skin, and weakness.

ETYMOLOGY: From Old English scurf, probably from Old Norse. Ultimately from the Indo-European root sker- (cut), which also gave us decorticate, excoriate, hardscrabble, incarnadine, scrobiculate, and caruncle. Earliest documented use: 1529.
________________________________

SCURLY - sounding like a bagpipes

SMURVY - like an ever-so-cute blue dwarv

SCURVEY - winding (see also SWURVY)
STURVY - -following one of the recipes which require you
to stir the concoction every couple of minutes or even 'constantly'.

wink
Posted By: wofahulicodoc a stroke of bad luck - 01/27/15 04:58 PM

APOPLECTIC

PRONUNCIATION: (ap-uh-PLEK-tik)

MEANING: adjective:
1. Extremely angry.
2. Relating to or affected by apoplexy (stroke).

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin apoplecticus, from Greek apoplektikos (relating to a stroke), from apoplessein (to disable by a stroke). Ultimately from the Indo-European root plak- (to strike), which also gave us plague, plankton, fling, and complain. Earliest documented use: 1625.

_________________________


APPLECTIC - can't read the instructions on my little downloaded smartphone program

MAPOPLECTIC - @#$%^"# navigation program directed me straight into a swamp!

AMPOPLECTIC - all of a sudden the power went out
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: a stroke of bad luck - 01/27/15 05:03 PM
APOPELECTIC when a pope can't make a decision.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc 'Lection is pending? - 01/27/15 07:02 PM

Originally Posted By: LukeJavan8
APOPELECTIC when a pope can't make a decision.


APOPELECTIC - interregnum at the Vatican ?
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: 'Lection is pending? - 01/27/15 09:04 PM
Could definitely apply
Posted By: wofahulicodoc a lot of gall, one way or another... - 01/28/15 05:16 PM

JAUNDICED

PRONUNCIATION: (JAHN-dist)

MEANING: adjective:
1. Exhibiting prejudice from envy or resentment.
2. Having jaundice: a disease that makes the skin, white of the eyes, etc., to be yellow, caused by an increase of bile pigments in the blood.

ETYMOLOGY: from Old French jaunice (yellowness), from jaune (yellow), from Latin galbinus (yellowish), from galbus (yellow). Earliest documented use: 1640.
__________________________

FAUNDICED - showing the symptoms of a Pandemic

JAUNDICTED - subjected to inflammatory discussion by a yellow journalist

JAUNEDICED - cut into tiny little yellow cubes, viz.


(Well,sorta. Do you like this one better?)
Posted By: LukeJavan8 - - - -capital crime. - 01/28/15 05:22 PM
FAUNDICID(E) - murder of a faun
(please excuse extra letter)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc The Es have it - 01/29/15 02:38 PM

METASTASIZE

PRONUNCIATION: (muh-TAS-tuh-syz)

MEANING: verb intr.
1. To spread or escalate in an undesirable manner.
2. (Of a cancer) To spread to other parts of the body.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin metastasis (transition), from Greek methistanai (to change), from meta- (beyond) + histanai (to set). Earliest documented use: 1907.

________________________________________

METASTASEIZE - Colonialism gone wild

METESTASIZE - I should try one on and see how it fits (pron. "me-test-a-size")
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: The Es have it - 01/30/15 02:40 PM

SCABROUS

PRONUNCIATION: (SKAB-ruhs)

MEANING: adjective:
1. Rough: having small raised dots or scales.
2. Salacious.
3. Difficult to deal with; knotty.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin scaber (rough). Earliest documented use: 1585

____________________________


SCARBROUS - a fair source of parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme

CABROUS - Ubereal

SABROUS - like a dance popularized by Aram Katchaturian in his Gayne Ballet *

*Edit: These days they seem to prefer it be spelled "Khachaturian." Sigh.

Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: The Es have it - 02/03/15 02:34 AM

NIMROD

PRONUNCIATION: (NIM-rod)

MEANING: noun:
1. A stupid person.
2. A hunter.

ETYMOLOGY: In the Bible, Nimrod was a hunter and Noah’s great-grandson. It’s not clear how the sense of the word transferred from a hunter to a stupid person, but the new sense was popularized in the Bugs Bunny cartoons when Bugs Bunny called rabbit-hunting Elmer Fudd as “Poor little Nimrod”. Earliest documented use for sense 1: 1933, for sense 2: 1623. Even earlier, the first recorded use in English is from 1548, in a now-obsolete sense as a tyrant.

_______________________

NIMROAD - what you drive on to visit the rats (well, I suppose technically there should be an H in it, too )

AIMROD - a sighting device to assist in pointing a moderately large telescope at its desired target
Posted By: LukeJavan8 - - - -ever watch them perform? - 02/03/15 05:10 AM
NIMBOD- contortionist, gymnast
Posted By: wofahulicodoc French, Spanish, whatever... - 02/03/15 03:16 PM

VIA DOLOROSA

PRONUNCIATION: (VY/VEE-uh dol-uh-RO-suh)

MEANING: noun: A distressing journey or experience.

ETYMOLOGY: After the route believed to have been taken by Jesus on his way to Calvary. From Latin via dolorosa (painful path), from via (path) + dolor (pain). Earliest documented use: 1878.

_________________________

VIAND OLOROSA - spoiled meat (you can tell because it smells)

VIA DONOROSA - Sir Orosa lives on this street

VIDOLO ROSA - a sweet red onion, not sharp at all, originally sold only in the Vidolo Farmers' Market in Toombs County, Georgia, USA (See here - it's not even Wikipedia!)
Posted By: May Re: ...a rose by any other name... - 02/03/15 04:41 PM
Ta! I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream.
cup or cone?

Via dolo rosa a new flavor at Salt and Straw. Tastes like....chicken. lol.
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: French, Spanish, whatever... - 02/03/15 05:18 PM
TIA DOLOROSA

aunt on mi madre's side.
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: French, Spanish, whatever... - 02/04/15 02:27 AM
VLAD OLOROSA - Also known as Vlad the Inhaler.
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: French, Spanish, whatever... - 02/04/15 03:19 AM
a challenge to symbicort?
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: French, Spanish, whatever... - 02/04/15 06:43 PM

SCAPEGOAT

PRONUNCIATION: (SKAYP-goht)

MEANING:
noun: One blamed for another’s wrongdoing.
verb tr.: To blame someone for another’s wrongdoing.

ETYMOLOGY: As sometimes happens with ancient books, this term arose as a misreading of a word as Hebrew ’ez ’ozel (goat that departs) for what was, in fact, the proper noun Azazel, apparently a name for a demon. The explanation given in Leviticus 16:8 is that one casts one’s sins on a goat and lets it escape into the wilderness. Earliest documented use: 1530.

___________________________________

SCAREGOAT - a mannikin meant to frighten other animals out of the vegetable patch

SCAPEMOAT - a hybrid protective feature surrounding a castle, meant to help the inhabitants swim away

SCAPEGOAL - Pete Carroll, at least this week
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: French, Spanish, whatever... - 02/05/15 01:14 AM
SCAPEBOAT – A faster, drier means of using scapemoat.

SCAPEGOA – The vista of India's smallest state.
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: French, Spanish, whatever... - 02/05/15 05:31 AM
SCAPEGOAD -urging escape.

Batman fought Azazel a number of times.


GETHSEMANE

PRONUNCIATION: (geth-SEM-uh-nee)

MEANING: noun: An instance or a place of suffering.

ETYMOLOGY: In the New Testament, Gethsemane was a garden near the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem, and the scene of Jesus’s agony and betrayal. Via Latin and Greek from Aramaic gat samne (oil press). Earliest documented use: 1901.

_______________________________

GETS E-MANE - grows a lot of electronic hair on the head and neck

METH SEMANE - Amphetamine Week in Paris

GET HISEMANE - be awarded the trophy for "Best College Football player for the Year"

SAMARITAN

PRONUNCIATION: (suh-MAIR-i-tn)

MEANING: noun: A person who voluntarily helps others in distress.
Also used as: good Samaritan.

ETYMOLOGY: From the parable of the Good Samaritan in Luke 10:30-37 in the New Testament where a Samaritan stopped to help a man who had been injured and robbed, while others passed by. The word Samaritan is from Latin Samaritanus (a resident of Samaria), ultimately from Greek Samareia, Samaria. Earliest documented use: 1000.

_______________________________

SAMARIAN - one who gives recapitulations of what has gone before

SAMOARIAN - a devotee of a confection made from toasted marshmallows, chocolate, and Graham crackers (see recipe)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc random thoughts on random words - 02/09/15 08:26 PM
EXORDIUM

PRONUNCIATION: (ig/eg-ZOR-dee-uhm, ik-SOR-)

MEANING: noun: The beginning or introductory part of anything, especially of a discourse, treatise, etc.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin ex- (out, from) + ordiri (to begin). Earliest documented use: 1531.

_______________________________

EXORCIUM - the expulsion of demons

EXFORDIUM - just can't spend that kind of money on it any more...

EXORADIUM - the "skin" of radium that accumulates on the outside of pellets of Uranium as they slowly undergo radioactive decay
Posted By: LukeJavan8 - - - Only the Alamo lives ! - 02/09/15 09:56 PM
TEXORDIUM-Texans denying there are 49 other states.
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: - - - Only the Alamo lives ! - 02/10/15 12:54 AM
EXODIUM – 1.Detestation of one's former partner. 2. On the other hand, maybe (s)he's not so bad after all.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: random thoughts on random words - 02/10/15 03:19 PM

RECRUDESCENCE

PRONUNCIATION: (ree-kroo-DES-uhns)

MEANING: noun: A renewed activity after a period of dormancy.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin recrudescere (to become raw again), from re- (again) + crudescere (to get worse), from crudus (raw). Earliest documented use: 1665.

______________________________

REBRUDESCENCE - Eau de Twice-Perked Coffee

RECRUDESCENE - about that gross part of the movie
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: random thoughts on random words - 02/11/15 01:35 AM
RECRUDESCIENCE – Concerning the inclusion of opinion and sloppy technique in the research data.
Posted By: May Re: random thoughts on random words - 02/11/15 06:15 AM
Just a cotton-pickin' minute, McGPS, this don't look like the Coachella Valley to me!

Opprobium
(uh-probi- um)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: random thoughts on random words - 02/11/15 07:49 PM

OPPROBRIUM

PRONUNCIATION: (uh-PRO-bree-uhm)

MEANING: noun:
1. Strong criticism.
2. Public disgrace

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin opprobrium (reproach), from ob- (against) + probrum (infamy, reproach). Ultimately from the Indo-European root bher- (to carry), which also gave us bear, birth, barrow, burden, fertile, transfer, offer, suffer, euphoria, and metaphor. Earliest documented use: 1656.
_______________________________________

COPPROBRIUM - what's going on in Ferguson, MO these days

OPPROBARIUM - in favor of GI X-ray studies with contrast material

COPPR O'BRIUM - one member of the Dublin police force
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: random thoughts on random words - 02/12/15 11:32 PM

COMPORTMENT

PRONUNCIATION: (kuhm-PORT-muhnt)

MEANING: noun: Behavior; demeanor; bearing.

ETYMOLOGY: From French comportement (behavior), from comporter (to bear), from Latin comportare (to transport), from com- (with) + portare (to carry). Ultimately from the Indo-European root per- (to lead, pass over), which also gave us support, petroleum, sport, passport, colporteur, rapporteur, deportment, Swedish fartlek, Norwegian fjord, and Sanskrit parvat (mountain). Earliest documented use: 1605.
____________________________________

COMPORTMEN - those who would teach you how to behave in polite society; style coaches

OOMPORTMENT - carrying yourslf like a brass band

COMPOSTMENT - the manufacture of organic fertilizer
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: random thoughts on random words - 02/13/15 01:18 PM
COMPOTMENT – a small enclosure or recess in a larger structure, often covered by a door or lid, in which to secure marijuana.
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: random thoughts on random words - 02/13/15 04:41 PM
COMFORTMENT solace in sorrow
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: random thoughts on random words - 02/13/15 07:36 PM

SOLICITUDE

PRONUNCIATION: (suh-LIS-i-tood, -tyood)

MEANING: noun: Care or concern for another.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin sollus (whole), ultimately from the Indo-European root sol- (whole), which brought us solid, salute, save, salvo, soldier, catholicity, salutary, and salubrious + citus, past participle of ciere (to arouse), ultimately from the Indo-European root kei- (to set in motion), which also gave us cinema, kinetic, excite, and resuscitate. Earliest documented use: 1412.

__________________________

SOLIDITUDE - impassiveness

SOLICITUNE - the piano-man's job in a bar

SOLICIDUDE - what a hooker does
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: random thoughts on random words - 02/16/15 06:29 PM

FRANKENFOOR

PRONUNCIATION: (FRANG-kuhn-food)

MEANING: noun: Genetically modified food.

ETYMOLOGY: From franken- (genetically modified), alluding to the artificially created Frankenstein’s monster. Earliest documented use: 1992.

_______________________________

FRANKENFORD - the Edsel, if you were a GM stockholdr

DRANKENFOOD - Jell-o (R) shots (recipe here, if you need it)

FRANKENGOOD - ultra-hip declaration of approval

Posted By: wofahulicodoc above and beyond - 02/17/15 04:02 PM

PRETERNATURAL

PRONUNCIATION: (pree/pri-tuhr-NACH-uh-ruhl)

MEANING: adjective: Beyond what is natural or normal.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin praeter- (beyond, past) + naturam (nature). Earliest documented use: 1580.

______________________________

PREFERNATURAL - no genetically-modified crops for me ! *

PRETERNAURAL - the sound of the beach before the birds arrive

* (but...hasn't every hybrid formed by deliberate cross-pollination been "genetically modified" ? )
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: above and beyond - 02/18/15 09:03 AM
PRETZERNATURAL – and so is the beer!

PETERNATURAL – Tromboniator's name at birth.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc compounding a felony - 02/18/15 09:26 PM

LOGOMANIOAC

PRONUNCIATION: (lo-guh-MAY-nee-ak)

MEANING: noun: One who is obsessively interested in words.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek logo- (word) + -mania (excessive enthusiasm or craze). Earliest documented use: 1870.

________________________________

BLOGOMANIAC - (daffynitions WNFR*)

LOGOMINIAC - a person obsessed with short words

LOOMANIAC - Weavers Gone Wild


* = "we never finished reading"
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: compounding a felony - 02/18/15 11:24 PM
LOGMANIAC – Paul Bunyan

LOGOMANIOC – Trademark of Tapioca, Inc.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc When in Rome - 02/19/15 02:38 PM

PARTHENONGENESIS

PRONUNCIATION: (par-thuh-no-JEN-uh-sis)

MEANING: noun: Reproduction without fertilization.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek partheno- (without fertilization, maiden) + -genesis (creation). Earliest documented use: 1849.

__________________________

PARTHENON-GENESIS - D'ya think we might build a great big building in Rome with our spare time and extra slaves. People could come and pray to Athena. (Not to be confused with PARTHE-NONGENESIS - Nah, it's probably just a waste of money, and they'll only tear it down in a couple of years anyway....)

PART-HEMOGENESIS - bone marrow that makes only red cells, not white cells or platelets

PARTHENOGENERIS - Ellen's pregnant!
left out the spermatophytes! -- the four phyla of the Plant kingdom)
---------------------------------------

BRYOLOGY

PRONUNCIATION: (bry-OL-uh-jee)

MEANING: noun: The branch of botany that deals with mosses, liverworts, and hornworts.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek bryo- (moss) + -logy (study). Earliest documented use: 1863.
_____________________________________

EBRYOLOGY - virtual genetic engineeering

BRIOLOGY - the study of vigor

BRYLOGY - the study of hair creem, or, My hair slickener is getting lazy

BERYOLOGY the study of gems, esp. those containing the metal with Atomic No. 4
Posted By: wofahulicodoc it's all Greek to me... - 02/23/15 02:06 PM

MODUS OPERANDI

PRONUNCIATION: (MOH-duhs op-uh-RAN-dee)

MEANING: noun: A particular way of doing something, especially a person’s typical mode of operation.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin modus operandi, from modus (mode) + operari (to work). Earliest documented use: 1654.

___________________________


MODUS OPERA AND I - Did you see Carmen yesterday? I'm in the chorus, as usual

MODS OPERANDI - how GenerationYers act

MODUS SPERANDI - a hopeful approach to life
Posted By: wofahulicodoc the thing speaks for itself - 02/25/15 03:15 AM

PER SE

PRONUNCIATION: (puhr SAY)

MEANING: adverb: In or by itself; intrinsically.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin per se, translation of Greek kath auto. Earliest documented use: 1505. Perse is something different.

________________________________

PER SHE - according to my wife

PERSEU - a singular fellow who killed the Gorgon Medusa

PER SEE - how a voyeur pays

Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: the thing speaks for itself - 02/25/15 04:22 PM
PAR SE (Latin) to conjugate or decline
Posted By: wofahulicodoc this one's too easy - 02/26/15 03:09 AM

EX POST

PRONUNCIATION: (eks POST)

MEANING:
adjective: Based on past events; actual, rather than predicted.
adverb: Retrospectively.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin ex (from) + post (after). Earliest documented use: 1937.

________________________________

EX POSH - lost everything in the Stock Market

EX PEST -
1. my former spouse is becoming a nuisance
2. Quick, Henry, the Flit ! (YCLIU)

EN POST - the check is in the mail
Posted By: wofahulicodoc it's true, you know... - 02/26/15 12:08 PM

BONA FIDE

PRONUNCIATION: (BOH-nuh fyd, FY-dee)

MEANING:
adjective: Genuine.
adverb: In good faith; sincerely.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin bonus (good) + fides (faith). Earliest documented use: 1542.

________________________________


BONA FIRE - an excited community conflagration in Rome

BONG FIDE - good weed

BONA FIDO - what you throw to the dog for good behavior
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: it's true, you know... - 02/26/15 01:26 PM
BONA FIFE - Musical instrument sometimes known as a radial flute.

BONA FIXE - Excellent narcotics.

BOTAFIDE - Describing wine that has been bottled in leather.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc on the other hand, - 02/27/15 03:46 PM

PER CONTRA

PRONUNCIATION: (per KON-truh)

MEANING:
adverb: On the contrary
noun: The opposite side.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin per (per) + contra (against). Earliest documented use: 1554.
___________________________

PERCO NRA - oxycodone for gun enthusiasts

PERI CONTRA - homophobic (doesn't like fairies)

PECCONTRA - a small sin against something-or-other
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: on the other hand, - 03/01/15 03:16 AM
PER CONTRAP – According to our agreement (which, you will find, it is impossible to get out of)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: on the other hand, - 03/02/15 02:17 PM

PARASTATAL

PRONUNCIATION: (par-uh-STAYT-l)

MEANING:
noun: A company or agency owned wholly or partly by the government.
adjective: Relating to such an organization.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek para- (beside) + state, from Latin status (condition). Earliest documented use: 1944.

__________________________________

TARASTATAL - How's the plantation doing, Scarlett?

PAPASTATAL - pertaining to the Fatherland

PARASTANAL - adjacent to Tin on the Periodic Table of the Elements, like Antimony, Indium, Germanium, or Lead
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: on the other hand, - 03/03/15 04:40 AM
PARASTRATAL - Referring to one or both of the castes on either side of us, unless we happen to be in the the very highest or very lowest, in which case just the one.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc ease - 03/03/15 04:37 PM

DEFERVESCENCE

PRONUNCIATION: (dee-fuhr-VES-uhns)

MEANING: noun: The abatement of a fever.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin de- (away from) + fervere (to boil, to be hot). Ultimately from the Indo-European root bhreu- (to boil or to bubble), which is also the source of brew, bread, broth, braise, brood, breed, barmy, and perfervid. Earliest documented use: 1721.

___________________________

DETERVESCENCE - apply a surfactant and avoid the bubbles

DECERVESCENCE - emptying your glass of Dos Equis cerveza

DEFERVESCENE - reduce the emotional overlay in a confrontation
Posted By: wofahulicodoc (aside) - 03/03/15 04:45 PM

I can't think of a good "U" word - do you s'pose Friday's word might be SYZYGY ?
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: ease - 03/05/15 04:11 AM

IMPRIMIS

PRONUNCIATION: (im-PRY-mis, -PREE-)

MEANING: adverb: In the first place.

ETYMOLOGY: From contraction of Latin phrase in primis (among the first), from in (among) and primus (first). The word was originally used to introduce the first of a number of articles in a list, such as a will, an inventory, etc. Earliest documented use: 1465.

_______________________________


JIMPRIMIS - King James the First

IMIPRIMIS - old tricyclic anti-depressent brand name that never caught on

IMPIRIMIS - Hello, Thisbe!
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: ease - 03/05/15 02:30 PM

POLTROON

PRONUNCIATION: (pol-TROON)

MEANING: noun: An utter coward.

ETYMOLOGY: From French poltron (coward), from Italian poltrone (lazy person), from Latin pullus (young animal). Ultimately from the Indo-European root pau- (few, little), which is also the source of few, foal, filly, pony, poor, pauper, poco, and catchpole. Earliest documented use: 1529.

____________________________

POLTOON - a political cartoon, like Doonesbury

POLTROOP - bussed-in voters

POLTRODON - a small dinosaur with teeth like a chicken's
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: ease - 03/06/15 11:30 AM
POLTRON - subatomic particle with distinct north and south.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: ease - 03/06/15 07:48 PM

TUMULUS

PRONUNCIATION: (TOO-myuh-luhs, TYOO-)

MEANING: noun:
1. A mound of earth placed over prehistoric tombs. Also known as a barrow.
2. A dome-shaped swelling formed in cooling lava.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin tumere (to swell). Earliest documented use: 1686.
_________________________________________

RUMULUS - the founder of Rome who liked to drink

TUMBULUS - acrobatic

TUMULUST - the state of arousal accompanying an erection

TUTULUS - a tiny Pharaoh
__________________________________________

(sorry, the list started shorter, but it just grew and grew...)
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: ease - 03/06/15 08:49 PM
TUM-U-LES - Brand of weight-loss pill.

TUMULUSH - Beer belly.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc FEE-etc - 03/07/15 10:25 PM

FUMULUS - a giant cursing
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Clerihew - 03/09/15 01:11 PM

CLERIHEW

PRONUNCIATION: (KLER-uh-hyoo)

MEANING: noun: A humorous, pseudo-biographical verse of four lines of uneven length, with the rhyming scheme AABB, and the first line containing the name of the subject.

ETYMOLOGY: After writer Edmund Clerihew Bentley (1875-1956), who originated it. Earliest documented use: 1928. Here is one of his clerihews:

Sir Christopher Wren
Said, “I am going to dine with some men.
If anyone calls
Say I am designing St. Paul’s.”

__________________________________

CHERIHEW - I cannot tell a lie, Fathler, I did cut down the tree.

CLERIHEM - to shorten priestly robes

CLERIHEE - half of a chuckle, upon reading a humorous short verse with lines of uneven length
(see also CLERIHAW)

Posted By: Tromboniator Re: Clerihew - 03/09/15 08:52 PM
CLEFIHEW - I'm sticking with the bass - can't read the pesky treble stuff.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Epigram - 03/11/15 01:13 AM

EPIGRAM

PRONUNCIATION: (EP-i-gram)

MEANING: noun: A short witty saying, often in verse.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin epigramma, from Greek epigramma, from epigraphein (to write, inscribe), from epi- (upon, after) + graphein (to write). Other words originating from the same root are graphite, paragraph, program, and topography. Earliest documented use: 1552.

__________________________________

EPIGLAM - Beauty is only skin deep

EPI-RAM - a Shofar (ram's horn)

PI-GRAM - a message sent by wire next Saturday morning at 9:26 (that'd be 3/14/15 9:26...)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Cento - 03/12/15 03:13 AM

CENTO

PRONUNCIATION: (SEN-to)

MEANING: noun: A literary work, especially a poem, composed of parts taken from works of other authors.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin cento (patchwork). Earliest documented use: 1605.
_____________________________

SCENTO - the smell of _________ (you fill in the blank)

CENSTO - if it makes this, you can justify anything...
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Limerick - 03/12/15 07:33 PM

LIMERICK

PRONUNCIATION: (LIM-uhr-ik)

MEANING: noun: A humorous, often risque, verse of three long (A) and two short (B) lines with the rhyme scheme AABBA.

ETYMOLOGY: After Limerick, a county in Ireland. The origin of the name of the verse is said to be from the refrain “Will you come up to Limerick?” sung after each set of extemporized verses popular at gatherings. Earliest documented use: 1896.

_______________________________________________


GLIMERICK - the duration of an average sighting of the Loch Ness Monster; also, its appearance

LIVERICK - typical child's response to being served fried organ meat (with or without bacon)

LIMEDICK - the Green Whale
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: Limerick - 03/13/15 12:17 PM
SLIMERICK – Pile of peat.

LIMEROCK - Green gemstone composed of crystalline vitamine C.

LIMERISK – A very, VERY naughty verse.

DOGGEREL

PRONUNCIATION: (DO-guhr-uhl, DOG-uhr-)

MEANING: noun:
1. Comic verse that is irregular in rhythm and in rhyme especially for burlesque or comic effect.
2. Trivial or bad poetry.

NOTES: Here’s poet John Skelton (c. 1463-1529) defending his doggerels:
For though my rhyme be ragged,
Tattered and jagged,
Rudely rain-beaten,
Rusty and moth-eaten,
If ye take well therewith,
It hath in it some pith.

ETYMOLOGY: Dogs have a bad rap in the language (see dog’s chance, dogsbody) and the word doggerel reflects that view. The word is apparently a diminutive of the word dog. Earliest documented use: 1405.

____________________________________________

DAGGEREL - (diminutive) a small dagger; a snickersnee

DODGEREL - the elevated subway line that brings you to Ebbets Field

DOGGEEL - perennial foe of catfish
DOGGERE - Turn down the corners of the pages of a book of bad poetry.
Posted By: May Re: Epigram - 03/14/15 07:07 PM
Epiham- hamspeak (QRS QRN)
Epispam- canned epigram

If, with the literate, I am
Impelled to try an epigram,
I never seek to take the credit;
We all assume that Oscar said it.

You can lead a horticulture but you can't make her think.

Edit by Jackie
May, I don't want to take anything away from what you did, but I got a notification that not only did your link to the image not show an image, it was so long that it made the screen go wide. I Copied your link to Google and got the image shown in my test post below, so I have deleted your long link and replaced it. If this is not the image you intended, I apologize. J.




Posted By: wofahulicodoc abstentious - 03/16/15 10:46 AM

ABSTENTIOUS

PRONUNCIATION: (abs-TEN-shus)

MEANING: adjective: Self-restraining, especially in eating or drinking.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin abstinere (to hold back), from ab- (away) + tenere (to hold). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ten- (to stretch), which also gave us tense, tenet, tendon, tent, tenor, tender, pretend, extend, tenure, tetanus, hypotenuse, pertinacious, detente, countenance, distend, extenuate, and tenable. Earliest documented use: 1839.

______________________________________

ABSENTIOUS - chronically truant

NABSTENTIOUS - having a tendency to arrest suspects, with very weak evidence
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: abstentious - 03/18/15 02:07 AM

ARTERIOUS

PRONUNCIATION: (ahr-TIR-ee-uhs)

MEANING: adjective: Of or relating to the arteries or a main road or channel.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin arteria, from Greek arteria (windpipe, artery). Ultimately from the Indo-European root wer- (to raise or lift), which is also the source of air, aira, aura, and meteor. Earliest documented use: 1578.

_______________________

ALTERIOUS - defacing promissory notes

HARTERIOUS - staglike

ASTERIOUS - having no depth
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: abstentious - 03/18/15 11:12 AM

PLACENTIOUS

PRONUNCIATION:
(pla-SEN-shus)

MEANING: adjective: Pleasing or inclined to please.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin placentia (pleasantness), from placere (to please). Earliest documented use: 1661.

_________________________________


PLACENTIOU - a Rumanian Candidate

PLACENTRIOUS - pertaining to the biological interface between a mother and her unborn child

PLACKENTIOUS - building up tartar (or so my dental hygeinist tells me)
Posted By: Jackie Re: Epigram - 03/19/15 04:53 AM
Doing a test:



Edit: Huh -- every once in a while I can be good for something! smile
Posted By: wofahulicodoc (P.S. Thanks, Jackie!) - 03/19/15 02:00 PM
Moving right along:

AERIOUS

PRONUNCIATION: (AY-ree-uhs)

MEANING: adjective: Of or like air; airy.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin aereus/aerius, adjectival form of aer (air). Earliest documented use: 1594.

__________________________

Ooh, lots of options here. And interestingly most of the changes could go equally well in front of the A or between the A and the E, with opposite definitions.

AERIOUS - nesting in high places (the "Identity Transform")

AFERIOUS - without iron; anemic

TERIOUS - weepy
XERIOUS - dry
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Epigram - 03/19/15 03:22 PM
Like Winnie the Pooh.
When your test is finished could you explain to us
(Me, the dummy) how you do it?
Posted By: Jackie Re: Epigram - 03/20/15 03:51 AM
Hi, Luke! First I tried simply Copying and deleting the long link and Pasting it into a new Image setup window. That didn't work, so then I Pasted the link into a Google search box, and this picture is what I got, along with some other things on the page. I clicked on the button that read View Image. That took me to a page that had ONLY the picture. Then I Copied that URL and Pasted it into a new Image setup window.
I hope this is the pic she intended to be seen.
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Epigram - 03/20/15 03:24 PM
Thanks Jackie, but I can't put tab A into slot B. I appreciate it,
but it makes little sense. I don't understand View Image, etc.
Am grateful for your attempt to 'teach' me.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc some people call it a "bigram" - 03/21/15 01:25 AM

DUOLITERAL

PRONUNCIATION: (doo-uh-LIT-uhr-uhl)

MEANING: adjective: Having two letters.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin duo (two), from Greek duo + littera (letter). Earliest documented use: 1828.

_______________________________

DULLITERAL - long, dry, and dusty, like Bunyan's "Pilgrim's Prpgress"

DUOLITTERAL - drop two pieces of trash

DUEL-ITERAL - engaging in one-on-one personal combat on a Roman road
Posted By: May Re: Epigram - 03/22/15 11:44 PM
Thank you kindly, Jackie! laugh I couldn't figure AWAD image completely. Now I see.

Yes, this is the correct image.
Posted By: Jackie Re: Epigram - 03/23/15 02:29 AM
Whew. smile
Posted By: wofahulicodoc cough with phlegm - 03/23/15 12:57 PM

EXPECTORATE

PRONUNCIATION: (ik-SPEK-tuh-rayt)

MEANING: verb tr., intr.: 1. To spit; 2. To eject by coughing.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin expectorare (to expel from the chest), from ex- (out) + pectus (br east). Earliest documented use: 1601.

_________________________

EXPECTORATE - I'm waiting for the Church service to start

TEXPECTORATE - Ted Cruz is thumping his chest again...

EXPERTORATE - the authority has spoken
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Oof! - 03/25/15 02:22 AM

SEISM

PRONUNCIATION: (SY-zuhm)

MEANING: noun: Earthquake.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek seismos, from seiein (to shake). Earliest documented use: 1883.

_______________________________

SHEISM - what a feminist practices

HEISM - what a bankrobber practices

SEISAM - six in the morning in Madrid
Posted By: wofahulicodoc indigenous humor - 03/26/15 03:35 AM

AUTOCHTHON

PRONUNCIATION: (o-TOK-thun)

MEANING: noun:
1. A native; an aborigine.
2. Something, as a rock, formed or originating in the place where found.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek autochthon (of the land itself), from auto- (self) + chthon (earth, land). Ultimately from the Indo-European root dhghem- (earth), which also sprouted human, homicide, humble, homage, chamomile, exhume, inhume, chthonic, disinter, chameleonic, and Persian zamindar (landholder). Earliest documented use: 1538. The opposite of this term is allochthon.

____________________________________


AUTOHTHON - the Daytohna 5000

AUTOCHRHON - a self-winding watch

AUROCHTHON - (obs) a prolonged race of ancient cattle-like creatures, exhausting them so severely they became extinct. (That was the end of the race of ancient cattle-llke creatlures)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc medieval physician's realm - 03/26/15 03:34 PM

LEECHDOM

PRONUNCIATION: (LEECH-duhm)

MEANING: noun: A remedy or medicine.

ETYMOLOGY: From Old English laecedom (medicine, healing), from laece (physician). The word for the bloodsucking parasite has a different origin. Earliest documented use: 900.

_____________________________

LECHDOM - Poland under President Walesa

LETCHDOM - oily and offensive sexual innuendo

LEECHDOME - where bloodsuckers play football

LEACHDOM - the practice of Septic Tank maintenance
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: medieval physician's realm - 03/26/15 03:37 PM
LEECH.COM their personal web site
Posted By: May Re: medieval physician's realm - 03/26/15 09:17 PM
¡lechedọ̄m! - The command Elsa gives to freeze hell over using Cryokinesis.

Warning: Como sigas dando la lata te va a dar una leche.

¡lẹ̄chedọ̄m!- The remedy
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Parkinsonian gait - 03/27/15 12:18 PM
FESTINATE

PRONUNCIATION: (verb: FES-tuh-nayt, adjective: -nayt, -nit)

MEANING:
verb tr., intr.: To hurry or hasten.
adjective: Hurried or hasty.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin festinare (to hasten). Earliest documented use: 1616.

_________________________________

BESTINATE - won the pie-eating contest

FESTAINATE - to cover with rust-marks

FEISTINATE - jaw thrust out, easily offended, and spoiling for a fight; pugnacious

Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Parkinsonian gait - 03/27/15 02:59 PM
FASTINATE Lent: meals, then no meals, and on and on
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: Parkinsonian gait - 03/28/15 02:56 AM
FISTINATE – Natural-born bare-knuckle fighter.
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Parkinsonian gait - 03/28/15 03:56 PM
smirk
Posted By: wofahulicodoc a ringing success - 03/30/15 11:15 AM

SATURNINE

PRONUNCIATION: (SAT-uhr-nyn)

MEANING: adjective
1. Sluggish.
2. Gloomy.
3. Cold.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin Saturninus (of Saturn). From the ancient belief in astrology that those born under the planet Saturn’s supposed influence had its characteristics. Since Saturn was the farthest known planet at the time, it was believed to be the slowest and coldest. The planet received its name after the Roman god of agriculture. Earliest documented use: 1433.

________________________________

SATIRNINE - SNL is going to move a few hours earlier

SATURNIZE - associate with brethren over the weekend (the night before we would have said "fraternize")

SAMURNINE - two more have joined the Magnificent Seven
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Quicksilver - 03/31/15 06:28 PM

MERCURIAL

PRONUNCIATION: (muhr-KYOOR-ee-uhl)

MEANING: adjective:
1. Fickle; volatile; changeable.
2. Animated; quick-witted; shrewd.
3. Relating to the metal, planet, or god Mercury.

ETYMOLOGY: After Mercury, Roman god of commerce, thievery, eloquence, communication, etc. The planet is named after the god and in ancient astrology those born under the supposed influence of Mercury were ascribed his qualities. Earliest documented use: 1300.

_____________________________

MEA-CURIAL - pertaining to my own personal division of the church

MER-BURIAL- Dumbledore may have seen a few of there underwater interments in some untold tales

MERC-URINAL - My Grand Marquis is so well equipped it comes with its own, er, facilities
Posted By: May Powell Books - 04/01/15 07:48 PM
smell•bound (smel-baund) adj.
Held as if under a spell by the scent of books.

Jo~vial - Jo March, Little Women
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Giant Red Spot - 04/02/15 01:19 AM
(Did you say Powell Books? 10th and Burnside? Portland?)
________________________

JOVIAL

PRONUNCIATION: (JOH-vee-uhl)

MEANING: adjective: Cheerful; good-humored.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin jovialis (of Jupiter), from Jov- (Jupiter). The word Jupiter is from Latin Jovis pater (father Jove). The planet Jupiter is named after the Roman god Jupiter and those born under the influence of this planet were supposed to be good-humored. Ultimately from the Indo-European root dyeu- (to shine) that is also the source of diva, divine, Jupiter, Jove, July, Zeus, and Sanskrit deva (god). Earliest documented use: 1590.

_________________________________

DOVIAL - avoiding conflict; peace-loiving

JORIAL - Superman'e Kryptonian father with hiccups

JOVINAL - a barbiturate that makes you feel Godike
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Giant Red Spot - 04/02/15 10:54 AM

EARTHY

PRONUNCIATION: (UHR-thee)

MEANING: adjective:
1. Relating to earth or soil.
2. Direct; uninhibited.
3. Coarse; unrefined.
4. Practical; down-to-earth.
5. Worldly, as opposed to heavenly.

ETYMOLOGY: From Old English eorthe (earth). Earliest documented use: 1398.

________________________________

EARTAY - rend in Pig-Latin

ARTHY - jointlike

EARTOY - my new hearing aid
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Giant Red Spot - 04/02/15 03:20 PM
HEARTHY The environment of a small log cabin with huge fireplace
Posted By: wofahulicodoc (Art is in the eye of the beholder) - 04/03/15 08:42 PM

MARTIAL

PRONUNCIATION: (MAHR-shuhl)

MEANING: adjective: Relating to war or warriors.

ETYMOLOGY: After Mars, Roman god of war, who also gave his name to the planet in our solar system. Earliest documented use: 1425.

___________________________

PARTIAL - my father's combat skills (my mother's are MARTIAL)

MARTGAL - a shopaholic

MARDIAL - pertaining to Tuesdays
Posted By: May Re: (Art is in the eye of the beholder) - 04/03/15 09:29 PM
Marshall Eriksen Technique (MET) - Elicitation using HIMYM

[video:youtube]https://youtu.be/wqG0l7-BUg0[/video]
Posted By: wofahulicodoc preaching to the quire - 04/06/15 11:59 PM

QUIESCENT

PRONUNCIATION: (kwee-ES-uhnt, kwy-)

MEANING: adjective: Still; inactive; not showing symptoms.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin quiescere (to rest), from quies (quiet). Earliest documented use: 1605.

_______________________________


QUIRESCENT -
1, the smell of newly opened paper
2. the smell of singers' robes

QUI-ESCIENT - Who knows?

Posted By: wofahulicodoc complete with feral alligators - 04/07/15 01:25 PM

CATACOMB

PRONUNCIATION: (KAT-uh-kom, -koom)

MEANING: noun:
1. An underground cemetery with passageways and recesses for graves.
2. A thing or a place that is complex or labyrinthine.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin catacumbas, of obscure origin. Earliest documented use: 971.

________________________________

CATACOMBO - a hot jazz trio, renowned for playing hep music

CHATACOMB - a hair salon

CATACOME - a difficult task, as in "It's virtually impossible to get a Catacome when you call it"
Posted By: wofahulicodoc variations on a theme - 04/08/15 12:25 PM

PERAMBULATE

PRONUNCIATION: (puh-RAM-byuh-layt)

MEANING: verb tr., intr.: To walk through; to roam.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin perambulare (to walk through), from per- (through) + ambulare (to walk). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ambhi- (around), which is also the source of ambulance, alley, preamble, bivouac, and obambulate. Earliest documented use: 1450.

__________________________________________

OPERAMBULATE - The Magic Flute has already started; too bad you walked in late

PERAMBULATTE - a cup of coffee to be consumed as you walk

PERAMBULANTE - what you pay to begin the walking game

Posted By: Tromboniator Re: variations on a theme - 04/08/15 06:12 PM
PEERAMBULATE - Walk with a colleague

PIERAMBULATE - Stroll along the docks

PERUMBULATE - Walk through shadows
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: variations on a theme - 04/09/15 03:12 PM

EXPURGATE

PRONUNCIATION: (EK-spuhr-gayt)

MEANING: verb tr.: To remove parts considered objectionable.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin expurgare (to purge), from ex- (out) + purgare (to cleanse). Earliest documented use: 1621.

______________________________

EXPURIATE - to introduce contaminants

EXPURGAZE - to cover the dirty parts with a fig leaf

TEXPURGATE - Forget the Alamo!
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: variations on a theme - 04/10/15 06:13 PM

FRANGIBLE

PRONUNCIATION: (FRAN-juh-buhl)

MEANING: adjective: Readily broken; breakable.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin frangere (to break) which also gave us fraction, refract, chamfer, defray, infringe, and fracture. Earliest documented use: 1440

___________________________

FANGIBLE - toothy

ORANGIBLE -
1. can be changed into a round juicy fruit
2. can be changed into a large primate

FLANGIBLE - useful for a food fight in the Cordon Blue School in Paris yesterday (portmanteau of FLING [past tense] and FLAN)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: variations on a theme - 04/13/15 08:54 PM

COLOPHON

PRONUNCIATION: (KOL-uh-fon, -fuhn)

MEANING: noun:
1. A note at the end of the book giving information about its production: font, paper, binding, printer, etc.
2. A publisher’s emblem, usually on the spine or the title page of the book.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin colophon, from Greek kolophon (summit, finishing touch). Ultimately from the Indo-European root kel- (to be prominent; hill), which also gave us colonel, colonnade, column, culminate, excel, and hill. Earliest documented use: 1628

_____________________________

ECOLOPHON - the school's PA system

COLOPHONY - the wordless campfire scene from Blazing Saddles

COLOTHON - the annual alumni fund-raising campaign, compressed into 24 hours (pronounced CALL-a-thon)
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: variations on a theme - 04/14/15 02:03 AM
COLONAPHON when a friend of mine watches the screen as
the doctor does his colonoscopy.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc flunko, flunkere, faculti bounsum - 04/15/15 02:10 AM

RECTO

PRONUNCIATION: (REK-toh)

MEANING: noun: The front of a leaf, the side that is to be read first.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin recto folio (right-hand leaf), from rectus (right). Ultimately from the Indo-European reg- (to move in a straight line, lead, or rule) that is also the source of regent, regime, direct, rectangle, erect, rectum, alert, source, surge, arrogate, abrogate, regent, and supererogatory. Earliest documented use: 1789.

NOTES: In languages that are written left-to-right, such as English, recto is the right-hand page. In languages written right-to-left, such as Arabic, recto is the left-hand page. The other side is called verso.

_________________________

RECITO - Latin for "I'm talking now, dammit, and don't you interrupt!"

ERECTO - early name considered for sildenafil (Viagra) until A C Gilbert Company put the kibosh on it

RECTOZ - what the Wicked Witch of the East and her minions would gladly have done of Dorothy had let them
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Bookworms of the World, Unite! - 04/15/15 01:58 PM

BIBLIOGONY

PRONUNCIATION: (bib-lee-OG-uh-nee)

MEANING: Noun: The art of producing or publishing books. Also known as bibliogenesis.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek biblio- (book) + -gony (origin). Earliest documented use: 1835.

_____________________________

BIBLIOGONE - book-burning

BIBLIAGONY - It's painful getting through this one (compare BIBLIOTONY, which is boring)

BIBLOGONY - Let's write a Scripture, like Dianetics or the Flying Spaghetti Monster
Posted By: wofahulicodoc the Tenth Cipher - 04/16/15 01:24 PM

CODEX

PRONUNCIATION: (KOH-deks)

MEANING: noun: A manuscript volume (as opposed to a scroll), especially of an ancient text.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin codex (tree trunk, wood block, book). Earliest documented use: 1581.

____________________________

EODEX - amphetamine for horses, banned at racetracks (see also GODEX)

COPEX - police officer's former spouse

CODEO - competition for computer programmers


OPISTHOGRAPH

PRONUNCIATION: (o-PIS-thuh-graf)

MEANING: noun: A text written on both front and back (of some parchment, papyrus, stone, etc.).

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek opistho- (back) + -graph (writing). Earliest documented use: 1623.
___________________________________

OPISTHEGRAPH - picture of a particular big-nosed penguin

OPISTHOGRAPE - growing them on both sides of the vine

APISTHOGRAPH - a chart chronicling honey-bee hive collapse worldwide

STOLID

PRONUNCIATION: (STAHL-id)

MEANING: adjective: Having or showing little emotion; dull; impassive.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin stolidus (dull, stupid). Ultimately from the Indo-European root stel- (to put or stand), which is also the source of stallion, stilt, install, gestalt, stout, and pedestal, stele, and epistolary. Earliest documented use: 1600.

________________________________

STORID - a UPC

STOWLID - put away the box top

STOLOID - like a short fur coat
Posted By: wofahulicodoc the Ns have it - 04/21/15 07:24 PM

ASCETIC

PRONUNCIATION: (uh-SET-ik)

MEANING: adjective: Practicing severe self-discipline or self-denial.
noun: One who practices severe self-discipline or self-denial.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek askesis (exercise or training), from askein (to exercise or work). Earliest documented use: 1646.

___________________________

NASCETIC - natural childbirth

ASCENIC - the view is nil

ASCENTIC - 1. having no odor; 2. rising gently
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Sorry, road closed - 04/22/15 04:17 PM

DOUR

PRONUNCIATION: (rhymes with tour; DOU-uhr)

MEANING: adjective: Sullen; severe; gloomy; stubborn.

ETYMOLOGY: Probably from Latin durus (hard). Earliest documented use: 1425.

___________________________

DROUR - your session with the psychiatrist

DTOUR - 1. the long way around; 2. where the D-golfers play
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Sorry, road closed - 04/22/15 04:20 PM
KOUR --to hide in fear.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Sorry, road closed - 04/23/15 11:02 AM
Originally Posted By: LukeJavan8
KOUR --to hide in fear.


laugh
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Sorry, road closed - 04/23/15 03:24 PM
I've always liked 'cower', but I do like this better,
thanks to your always inciteful suggestions for the
inspiration.

INTRACTABLE

PRONUNCIATION: (in-TRAK-tuh-buhl)

MEANING: adjective: Not easily handled, managed, or controlled.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin tractare (to handle), frequentative of trahere (draw). Earliest documented use: 1545.

___________________________________

ENTR'ACTABLE - capable of being separated into two parts by an intermission

INTER.ACT.ABLE - and if that doesn't help we can just bury the whole show

INTRACTABILE - Sorry, but the only way you're going to get any relief is if we take out your gall bladder
INTRATABLE – Arthur's knights keep it among themselves.

LISSOM pr LISSIOME

PRONUNCIATION: (LIS-uhm)

MEANING: adjective: Agile; graceful.

ETYMOLOGY: Alteration of lithesome, from Old English lithe (flexible, mild) + -some (having a particular quality). Earliest documented use: 1800.

_______________________


BLISSOME - the sense of well-being that suffuses us upon contemplating a well-formed member of ones preferred gender

LASSOME - what the li'l dogie who won't run away is saying

LISTSOME - a likely consequence of taking on water, if you're a boat
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Two's company - 04/27/15 05:28 PM

OS

PRONUNCIATION: (aws)

MEANING: noun:
1. A mouth or an orifice. [plural ora]
2. A bone. [plural ossa]

ETYMOLOGY:
For 1: From Latin os (mouth). Earliest documented use: 1859.
For 2: From Latin os (bone). Earliest documented use: 1400.

NOTES:
It also appears as an abbreviation in many fields, including
Chemistry: Os - symbol for the element osmium
Computing: OS - Operating System
Medicine: OS - left eye (from Latin oculus sinister)
Linguistics: OS - Old Saxon

________________________

OZ:
1. a surgeon who got a TV show and started endorsing products of dubious value
2. abbreviation for "ounce"
3. magical land, site of many L. Frank Baum stories
4. vernacular for "Australia"

ON:
1. opposite of "off"
2. a debt of honor, in Japan

OB:
1. a physician who practices Obstetrics, delivering babies
2. an obligation (see ON above)
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: Two's company - 04/27/15 11:21 PM
OD – Just a little strange.
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Two's company - 04/28/15 03:42 PM
OL not necessarily laughing
Posted By: wofahulicodoc re: OL - 04/28/15 09:05 PM

Nice concept, Luke...
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Eh? - 04/28/15 09:12 PM

aa

PRONUNCIATION:
(AH-ah)


MEANING:
noun: Lava having a rough surface.


ETYMOLOGY:
From Hawaiian aa (to burn). Earliest documented use: 1859.


NOTES:
Aa is one of the two kinds of lava typically found in Hawaiian volcanoes. The other kind is pahoehoe, one with a smooth, ropy surface.

__________________________________

Xa:

1. a clotting factor, after which was named the anti-coagulant Xarelto, of TV advertising notoriety fame. That's pronounced "Ten-a," 'cuz it's a Roman number

2. half of a Latin American dance (if you make it Greek ("Cha") instead of Latin as above)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc BTW - 04/28/15 09:15 PM

I'll be Away From Keyboard for the next week or so; I hope someone else can take the daily ritual during that time...
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: BTW - 04/28/15 09:45 PM
Nobody can take your place, but some of us may try to contribute.
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: re: OL - 04/28/15 09:47 PM
thanks, that's the limit of my textese.
Posted By: Tromboniator Practical musketeering - 05/08/15 11:02 PM
futilitarian

PRONUNCIATION:
(fyoo-til-i-TAR-ee-uhn)

MEANING:
adjective:
1. Devoted to futile pursuits.
2. Holding the belief that human striving is useless.

noun:
1. A person devoted to futile pursuits.
2. One who believes that human striving is useless.

ETYMOLOGY:
A blend of futile and utilitarian. Earliest documented use: 1827.

_____________________________________

FUSILITARIAN — Useful in the employment of flintlock muskets.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc roe, roe, roe your boat - 05/12/15 10:46 AM

SHADCHAN

PRONUNCIATION: (SHAHT-khuhn)

MEANING: noun: A matchmaker or a marriage-broker.

ETYMOLOGY: From Yiddish shadkhan, from Hebrew. Earliest documented use: 1890.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: It doesn't matter how beautiful your theory is, it doesn't matter how smart you are. If it doesn't agree with experiment, it's wrong. -Richard Feynman, physicist, Nobel laureate (11 May 1918-1988)

________________________________


SHADCHEN -- a small female German fish
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: roe, roe, roe your boat - 05/12/15 06:31 PM

GUNSEL

PRONUNCIATION: (GUHN-suhl)

MEANING: noun:
1. A gun-carrying criminal.
2. A tramp’s young intimate companion.

ETYMOLOGY: Alteration of the Yiddish genzel (gosling) influenced by the word gun. Ultimately from the Indo-European root ghans- (goose), which also gave us goose, gosling, and gander. Earliest documented use: 1914.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: Neither genius, fame, nor love show the greatness of the soul. Only kindness can do that. -Jean Baptiste Henri Lacordaire, preacher, journalist, and activist (1802-1861)

______________________________

HUNSEL - His fairy-tale stepmother took him to the forest to losehim, buthe savedhimself by letting down his golden hair

GURNSEL - a little wheeled stretcher

GUNSELF - I'm really a big shot!

Posted By: wofahulicodoc tum-balalaika - 05/14/15 01:06 AM

TUMMLER

PRONUNCIATION: (TOOM-luhr)

MEANING: noun:
1. A comedian, social director, or entertainer who encourages an audience or guests to participate in entertainment activities.
2. One who incites others to action.
3. A lively, mischievous man.

ETYMOLOGY: From Yiddish tumler (one who makes a racket), from tumlen (to make a racket), from German tummeln (to stir). Earliest documented use: 1930s.

NOTES: Catskill resorts in the Catskill Mountains in New York State were a popular vacation destination for Jews during the last century. They were known as the Borscht Belt, after borscht, a type of beet soup popular with Ashkenazi Jewish immigrants. Tummlers were a standard fixture in these resorts.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: How simple life becomes when things like mirrors are forgotten. -Daphne du Maurier, novelist (13 May 1907-1989)

____________________________________

THUMMLER - an expert and enthusistic text-messager
Posted By: wofahulicodoc uses an electric shaver ? - 05/15/15 10:36 AM

SHICKER

PRONUNCIATION: (SHIK-uhr)

MEANING:
noun: A drunkard; alcoholic liquor.
adjective: Drunk.
verb intr.: To drink or to get drunk.

ETYMOLOGY: From Yiddish shiker, from Hebrew shikkor, from shakar (to be drunk). Earliest documented use: 1892.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: Knowing trees, I understand the meaning of patience. Knowing grass, I can appreciate persistence. -Hal Borland, author and journalist (14 May 1900-1978)

______________________________

SHTICKER - a drunk Borscht Belt comedian with a clichéd routine

Posted By: wofahulicodoc Marvelous - 05/15/15 10:46 AM

HEIMISCH

PRONUNCIATION: (HAY-mish, HY-)

MEANING: adjective: Homey; unpretentious.

ETYMOLOGY: From Yiddish heymish (domestic), from Old High German heim (home). Ultimately from the Indo-European root tkei- (to settle or dwell), which also gave us home, haunt, hangar, site, situate, and hamlet. Earliest documented use: 1964.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: I feel fairly certain that my hatred harms me more than the people whom I hate. -Max Frisch, architect, playwright, and novelist (15 May 1911-1991)
______________________________

HEIMLISCH - a composer of popular songs, known as much for getting obstructing foreign objects out of people's throat as for putting words and music into their mouth
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Marvelous - 05/15/15 03:29 PM
HEINISCH Heineken's little sister
Posted By: May Hey there, hi there, ho there - 05/16/15 07:03 PM
Heymish- A word used when one recognizes someone with the munchies. Points and laughs, "Heymish!"



The Heimish Theory ~ A new sitcom using recursive humor designed to make people feel happyish when in a blackish mood.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Marvelous - 05/18/15 01:20 PM

DEVOLVE

PRONUNCIATION: (di-VOLV)

MEANING:
verb tr., intr.: To transfer or be passed (duties, rights, powers, etc.) on to another.
verb intr.: To deteriorate or degenerate.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin devolvere (to roll down), from de- (down) + volvere (to roll). Ultimately from the Indo-European root wel- (to turn or roll), which also gave us waltz, revolve, valley, walk, vault, volume, wallet, helix, and voluble. Earliest documented use: 1420.


A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: I found one day in school a boy of medium size ill-treating a smaller boy. I expostulated, but he replied: 'The bigs hit me, so I hit the babies; that's fair.' In these words he epitomized the history of the human race. -Bertrand Russell, philosopher, mathematician, author, Nobel laureate (18 May 1872-1970)

______________________________


DEVOLE - remove those pesky Varmints from the lawn

DEVALVE - turn your trumpet into a bugle
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Marvelous - 05/19/15 06:47 PM

EDIFY

PRONUNCIATION: (ED-i-fy)

MEANING: verb tr.: To instruct in order to improve the mind or character.

ETYMOLOGY: Via French from Latin aedificare (to build), from aedis (building) + facere (make). Earliest documented use: 1340.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: Red roses for young lovers. French beans for longstanding relationships. -Ruskin Bond, author (b. 19 May 1934)

__________________________

FEDIFY - creeping Socialism

EDIFLY - a new New Jersey municipality, formed by the merging of Edison and Tenafly
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Marvelous - 05/19/15 07:35 PM
EXIFY - to mark 'the spot' on a treasure map.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Marvelous - 05/21/15 02:37 AM

PARLAY

PRONUNCIATION: (PAHR-lay)

MEANING: verb tr.: 1. To use an initial asset to achieve something more valuable. 2. To gamble an initial stake and winnings on a subsequent bet, race, contest, etc.
noun: A bet that uses the earlier bet and its winnings as the new bet.

ETYMOLOGY: An alteration of paroli (staking the double of the sum staked before), from French, from Italian paroli, plural of parolo, perhaps from paro (equal), from Latin par (equal). Earliest documented use: 1828.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: When women love us, they forgive us everything, even our crimes; when they do not love us, they give us credit for nothing, not even our virtues. --Honore de Balzac, novelist (20 May 1799-1850)

______________________________________


PARSLAY - a killer vegetable
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Marvelous - 05/22/15 02:20 AM

espouse

PRONUNCIATION: (i-SPOUZ)

MEANING: verb tr.:
1. To adopt or support a cause, idea, belief, etc.
2. To take as spouse: marry.

ETYMOLOGY: From Old French espouser, from Latin sponsare (to betroth), from sponsus (betrothed). Ultimately from the Indo-European root spend- (to make an offering or perform a rite), which is also the source of sponsor, spouse, respond, and riposte. Earliest documented use: 1477.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
In words as fashions the same rule will hold,
Alike fantastic if too new or old;
Be not the first by whom the new are tried,
Nor yet the last to lay the old aside.
-Alexander Pope, poet (21 May 1688-1744)

_________________________

eespouse - mrs cummings
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Marvelous - 05/22/15 05:20 AM
grin
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Look sharp, feel sharp, be sharp - 05/22/15 05:12 PM

ACERBATE

PRONUNCIATION: (AS-uhr-bayt)

MEANING: verb tr.: To irritate or to aggravate.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin acerbus (bitter). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ak- (sharp), which is also the source of acrid, vinegar, acid, acute, edge, hammer, heaven, eager, oxygen, mediocre, paragon, acuity, and acidic. Earliest documented use: 1657.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts. - Arthur Conan Doyle, physician and writer (22 May 1859-1930) (put into the mouth of Sherlock Holmes)

__________________________________

[I see several comments about why "acerbate" should mean the same thing (almost) as its apparent negation "exacerbate." Isn't there a usage of some prefixes as intensifiers, rather than negation? Think about "flammable" and inflammable."]
__________________________________

ACEREBATE - the hardware store is giving out refunds
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Marvelous - 05/22/15 05:19 PM
Originally Posted By: LukeJavan8
grin

"It isn't brains, because You-know-why, Rabbit," said Pooh, "but it comes to me sometimes."
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Marvelous - 05/22/15 08:09 PM
Rabbits, schnabbits, said pooh, still one of the cleverest
on the site, from my opinion. Good going !
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: Marvelous - 05/23/15 01:50 AM
ACERGATE – Exam cheating scandal.
Posted By: May Something we forgot - 05/23/15 12:15 PM
as❃teriskbate and switch- Now you know the basik plot
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Look sharp, feel sharp, be sharp - 05/25/15 01:39 PM

POLITESSE

PRONUNCIATION: (pol-i-TES, po-lee-)

MEANING: noun: Formal politeness or courtesy.

ETYMOLOGY: From Old French politesse (cleanness, polished state), from Italian politezza (polish, smoothness), from Latin polire (to polish). Ultimately from the Indo-European root pel- (skin or hide), which also gave us pelt, pillion, and film. Earliest documented use: 1683.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: Every great institution is the lengthened shadow of a single man. His character determines the character of the organization. -Ralph Waldo Emerson, writer and philosopher (25 May 1803-1882)

_________________________________

LOLITESSE - tantalizing youthful nubility
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Look sharp, feel sharp, be sharp - 05/25/15 04:35 PM
DOLITESSE -small girl's tea party.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Let it be - 05/26/15 05:39 PM

LAISSEZ-FAIRE

PRONUNCIATION: (les-ay-FAIR)

MEANING: noun:
1. The practice of noninterference in the affairs of others.
2. The economic policy allowing businesses to operate with little intervention from the government.

ETYMOLOGY: From French, literally “allow to do”. Earliest documented use: 1825.

___________________________

LAISSEZ-FAURÉ - don't disturb Gabriel; he's composing
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Johnny-on-the-Spot - 05/27/15 04:00 PM

DE RIGUEUR

PRONUNCIATION: (duh ree-GUHR)

MEANING: adjective: Required by fashion, custom, or etiquette.

ETYMOLOGY: From French de rigueur (literally, of strictness), from Latin rigor. Ultimately from the Indo-European root streig- (to stroke or press), which also gave us strait, strike, streak, strict, stress, and strain. Earliest documented use: 1850.

_________________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: Compassion is not weakness and concern for the unfortunate is not socialism. - Hubert Humphrey, US Vice President (27 May 1911-1978)
___________________________


DERRIGUEUR - a small pocket pistol, easily concealed; a "must-carry" for today's stylish rogue
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Johnny-on-the-Spot - 05/27/15 05:25 PM

DERRIGUEUR - a small pocket pistol, easily concealed; a "must-carry" for today's stylish rogue

R > T


DETRIGUER - Smaller version of same, to fit a woman's purse, or
man's back pocket
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Johnny-on-the-Spot - 05/28/15 02:38 AM

Hmm. And here I thought DETRIGUEUR was what de Frenchman pulled to make de gun shoot...
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Johnny-on-the-Spot - 05/28/15 04:06 AM
One less "U".
Posted By: wofahulicodoc That's what I said! - 05/28/15 02:54 PM

SOI-DISANT

PRONUNCIATION: (swa-dee-ZAN)

MEANING: adjective: Self-styled; so-called.

ETYMOLOGY: From French soi-disant (self-styled, so-called) from soi (oneself) + disant (saying). Earliest documented use: 1752.
_______________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: Necessity is the plea for every infringement of human freedom. It is the argument of tyrants; it is the creed of slaves. -William Pitt, British prime minister (28 May 1759-1806)
_______________________

SO I.D. ISN'T - and therefore no on can tell who I am...
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: That's what I said! - 05/29/15 03:15 PM

LAISSER-ALLER

PRONUNCIATION: (les-ay-ah-LAY)

MEANING: noun: Unrestrained freedom.

ETYMOLOGY: From French laisser-aller (to allow to go). Earliest documented use: 1842.
_______________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: War will exist until that distant day when the conscientious objector enjoys the same reputation and prestige that the warrior does today. -John F. Kennedy, 35th US president (29 May 1917-1963)
_______________________


BLAISSER-ALLER - Thank Goodness he's going

LAISSER-ALTER - take it to the tailor, it needs to be let out a little across the shoulders

LA KISSER-ALLER -
1. (French) Loves 'em and leaves 'em
2. (English) promiscuous

Posted By: wofahulicodoc all play and no work - 06/01/15 05:00 PM

SINECURE

PRONUNCIATION: (SY-ni-kyoor, SIN-i-)

MEANING: noun: A position in which one is paid for little or no work.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin beneficium sine cura (a church position not involving caring for the souls of the parishioners), from sine (without) + cura (care). Earliest documented use: 1662.

_____________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: War is merely the continuation of policy by other means. -Carl von Clausewitz, general and military theorist (1 Jun 1780-1831
______________________

SEINECURÉ - the priest in Notre Dame cathedral

SHINECURE - fighting depression with high-gloss shoes

SINECURVE - ~
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: all play and no work - 06/02/15 06:59 PM

PATHOGRAPHY

PRONUNCIATION: (puh-THOG-ruh-fee)

MEANING: noun: A biography that focuses on the negative.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek patho- (suffering, disease) + -graphy (writing). In the beginning, pathography was a description of a disease. Then the word came to be applied to the study of an individual or a community as relating to the influence of a disease. Now the term mostly refers to a biography focusing on the negative. Earliest documented use: 1848.
__________________________


A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: The business of the poet and the novelist is to show the sorriness underlying the grandest things and the grandeur underlying the sorriest things. -Thomas Hardy, novelist and poet (2 Jun 1840-1928)

__________________________

PATH-O-GRAPH® - A toy that draws mazes

PATIOGRAPHY - The Art of Terrazzo

PLATHOGRAPHY - Who Is Sylvia?
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: all play and no work - 06/03/15 12:44 PM

PERFORMATIVE

PRONUNCIATION: (puhr-FOR-muh-tiv)

MEANING: adjective: Relating to a statement that functions as an action by the fact of its being uttered.

NOTES: Some examples of performative utterances are I promise, I apologize, I bet, I resign, etc. By saying I promise a person actually performs the act of promising.

ETYMOLOGY: From Old French parfournir, from par (through) + fournir (to furnish). Earliest documented use: 1922.
____________________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: There is nothing more dangerous than a government of the many controlled by the few. -Lawrence Lessig, professor and political activist (b. 3 Jun 1961)
____________________________

APERFORMATIVE - monkey-shaped

PERFORATIVE - pointed
Posted By: wofahulicodoc crickets do it - 06/04/15 12:48 PM

STRIDULATE

PRONUNCIATION: (STRIJ-uh-layt)

MEANING: verb intr.: To make a shrill creaking noise by rubbing body parts together.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin stridere (to make a harsh sound). Earliest documented use: 1838.

__________________________


A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: If you break your neck, if you have nothing to eat, if your house is on fire, then you've got a problem. Everything else is an inconvenience...Life is inconvenient. Life is lumpy. A lump in the oatmeal, a lump in the throat, and a lump in the breast are not the same kind of lump. One needs to learn the difference. -Robert Fulghum, author (b. 4 Jun 1937)

__________________________


STRIDULANTE - to make a shrill creaking noise by rubbing together a few chips as you throw them onto the poker table to start the next pot

STRIPULATE - what you may be told when you're tardy at the nudist camp
Posted By: wofahulicodoc all is not what it seems to be... - 06/05/15 05:06 PM

MALA FIDE

PRONUNCIATION: (MAL-uh FY-dee)

MEANING: adverb, adjective: In bad faith.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin mala fide, from malus (bad) + fides (faith). Earliest documented use: 1561.
_______________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: I'm sometimes asked "Why do you spend so much of your time and money talking about kindness to animals when there is so much cruelty to men?" I answer: "I am working at the roots." -George T. Angell, reformer (5 Jun 1823-1909)
_______________________

MAILAF.I.D.E. - send a letter to the World Chess Federation

MALAFIDO - Bad dog!

ANTIMACASSAR

PRONUNCIATION: (an-ti-muh-KAS-suhr)

MEANING: noun: A piece of covering placed over the back or arms of a seat to protect from hair oil, dirt, etc.

ETYMOLOGY: From anti- (against) + Macassar oil (a hair oil), said to be made from ingredients from Macassar (now spelled as Makassar), a city in Indonesia. Earliest documented use: 1852.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: The memory of most men is an abandoned cemetery where lie, unsung and unhonored, the dead whom they have ceased to cherish. -Marguerite Yourcenar, novelist (8 Jun 1903-1987)

_________________________________

ANTIMACATSAR - against selecting an Irishman to be the ruler of all Russia

PODUNK

PRONUNCIATION: (POH-dungk)

MEANING: noun: A small, unimportant town.

ETYMOLOGY: Podunk is the name of a river and a native tribe in Connecticut. Over time the name came to be used for several small towns including a mythical small and insignificant town. Earliest documented use: 1657.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: My sole inspiration is a telephone call from a director. -Cole Porter, composer and songwriter (9 Jun 1893-1964)
___________________________

PODUCK - Daffy has lost all his money

IODUNK - an antiseptic to dip your boo-boo in

PRODUNK - LeBron James at work
POBUNK POLITICIANS whenever they open their mouths.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Some Pig, or, Veni, vidi, vici - 06/10/15 09:37 PM

CHARLATAN

PRONUNCIATION: (SHAHR-luh-tuhn)

MEANING: noun: One making false claim to having a certain expertise; a fraud or quack.

ETYMOLOGY: From French charlatan, from Italian ciarlatano, from cerretano (an inhabitant of Cerreto). Cerreto is a village in Umbria, Italy, once known for its quacks. Another etymology pins the origin of the term on the Italian ciarlare (to chatter), of imitative origin. Perhaps the word charlatan is a blend of the two, as charlatans are known for chattering. Earliest documented use: 1607.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
The ideal scientist thinks like a poet and only later works like a bookkeeper. -E.O. Wilson, biologist (b. 10 Jun 1929)

____________________________


CHARLOTAN - a brown spider who weaves words into her web

CHARLATIN - Virgil's cleaning lady

SPANIEL

PRONUNCIATION: (SPAN-yuhl)

MEANING: noun:
1. A submissive or fawning person.
2. Any of several breeds of small to medium-sized dogs with long drooping ears and a silky coat.

ETYMOLOGY: From Old French espaignol/espaigneul (Spanish dog), from Hispaniolus (Spanish), from Hispania (Spain). Earliest documented use: 1386.

_______________________________


A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: I never saw an ugly thing in my life: for let the form of an object be what it may, -- light, shade, and perspective will always make it beautiful. -John Constable, painter (11 Jun 1776-1837)

_______________________________

SPACI-EL - Superman's ditzy teenage sister, on Krypton
Posted By: wofahulicodoc witchburning in Machu Picchu ? - 06/12/15 07:34 PM

JERUSALEM SYNDROME

PRONUNCIATION: (ji-ROOS-uh-luhm SIN-drohm)

MEANING: noun: A phenomenon in which a visitor to a holy place suffers from religious psychosis, such as believing him- or herself to be a messiah.

ETYMOLOGY: After Jerusalem, Israel, where the phenomenon was first described by the psychiatrist Heinz Herman. Earliest documented use: 1987.
_____________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: No one has ever become poor by giving. -Anne Frank, Holocaust diarist (12 Jun 1929-1945)
_____________________

PERUSALEM SYNDROME - the sense of knowledge, empowerment, and righteousness one gets from sufficiently assiduous study of the Holy Writ

Posted By: wofahulicodoc Frostiana - 06/16/15 01:01 AM

TENEBROUS

PRONUNCIATION: (TEN-uh-bruhs)

MEANING: adjective: Dark, gloomy, or obscure.

ETYMOLOGY: From Old French tenebreus, from Latin tenebrosus (dark), from tenebrae (darkness). Earliest documented use: 1420.

_______________________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: To a father growing old, nothing is dearer than a daughter. -Euripides, playwright (c. 480-406 BCE)
_______________________________

DENEBROUS - Something like a Star

ENEBROUS - drunk and vomiting (compare "inebrous")
Posted By: wofahulicodoc he must be kidden - 06/16/15 11:50 PM

SWIDDEN

PRONUNCIATION: (SWID-n)

MEANING: noun: An area of land cleared for farming by slashing and burning the vegetation.

ETYMOLOGY: A variant of Northern English dialect swithen (to burn), from Old Norse svithna (to be singed). Earliest documented use: 1868.

USAGE:
“Some headed out to the charred earth of their swidden gardens to tend crops of manioc, bananas, and sweet potatoes.”
Chip Brown; Kayapo Courage; National Geographic (Washington, DC); Jan 2014.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: The [Nobel] prize is such an extraordinary honor. It might seem unfair, however, to reward a person for having so much pleasure over the years, asking the maize plant to solve specific problems and then watching its responses. -Barbara McClintock, scientist, Nobel laureate (16 Jun 1902-1992)

______________________________

SLIDDEN - past tense of "slide;" compare "hide."

USAGE: "The runner slidden to second base ahead of the throw, and the umpire called "Safe!"
Posted By: wofahulicodoc I can see clearly now ... NOT! - 06/18/15 02:23 AM

TURBID

PRONUNCIATION: (TUHR-bid)

MEANING: adjective:
1. Unclear; opaque.
2. Dark or dense, as smog or clouds.
3. Confused or muddled.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin turba (turmoil, crowd). Earliest documented use: 1626. Not to be confused with turgid.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: Silence will save me from being wrong (and foolish), but it will also deprive me of the possibility of being right. -Igor Stravinsky, composer (17 Jun 1882-1971)

___________________________

SURBID - Eight spades !

TOURBID - Couldja drive me around town this afternoon and show me the sights for $500?

TURBED - Go away! It's seven in the morning. I said not to wake me up until eleven! Didn't you see the sign I hung on the doorknob?
[ "Do Not Disturb"]
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: I can see clearly now ... NOT! - 06/18/15 03:11 PM
TURKID IQ and personality of the Thanksgiving delight.
PROLEGOMENON

PRONUNCIATION: (pro-li-GOM-uh-non, -nuhn)

MEANING: noun: A critical, introductory discussion, especially an introduction to a text.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek prolegómenon, from prolegein (to say beforehand), from pro- (before) + legein (to say). Ultimately from the Indo-European root leg- (to collect, speak), which is also the source of other words such as lexicon, lesson, lecture, legible, legal, legend, select, alexia, cull, lection, ligneous, lignify, subintelligitur, and syllogistic. Earliest documented use: 1600.
______________________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: If slaughterhouses had glass walls, everyone would be a vegetarian. -Paul McCartney, singer-songwriter, composer, poet, and activist (b. 18 Jun 1942)
____________________________


PRO-LEGO-MELON - in favor of cantaloupe made of many small brightly-colored interlocking plastic blocks

FRUCTUOUS

PRONUNCIATION: (FRUHK-choo-uhs, FROOK-)

MEANING: adjective: Productive; fruitful; fertile.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin fructus (fruit), from frui (to enjoy). Earliest documented use: 1382.
____________________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction. -Blaise Pascal, philosopher and mathematician (19 Jun 1623-1662)
____________________________

FRICTUOUS - rough, scratchy

FRUSTUOUS - like a pedestal with a flat top and slanted sides
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Climb Every Mountain - 06/23/15 01:56 AM

PRECIPITOUS

PRONUNCIATION: (pri-SIP-i-tuhs)

MEANING: adjective:
1. Resembling a precipice, a cliff with a nearly vertical overhanging face.
2. Extremely steep.
3. Abrupt, rapid, or hasty (applied to a worsening situation).

ETYMOLOGY: From obsolete French précipiteux, from Latin praecipitare (to cast down headlong), from prae- (before) + caput (head). Ultimately from the Indo-European root kaput- (head), also the origin of head, captain, chef, chapter, cadet, cattle, chattel, achieve, biceps, mischief, occiput, recapitulate, and capitation. Earliest documented use: 1646.

______________________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: Him that I love, I wish to be free -- even from me. -Anne Morrow Lindbergh, author and aviator (22 Jun 1906-2001)
______________________________

PRECIPITONS - what you use to help you climb a nearly vertical overhanging face

PRECIPITORUS - raining doughnuts
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Climb Every Mountain - 06/24/15 01:28 AM

OPPUGN

PRONUNCIATION: (uh-PYOON)

MEANING: verb tr.: To call in question; to contradict; to dispute.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin oppugnare (to fight or oppose), from ob- (against) + pugnare (to fight), from pugnus (fist). Ultimately from the Indo-European root peuk- (to prick) which is also the source of point, puncture, pungent, punctual, poignant, pounce, poniard, impugn, pugilist, and pugnacious. Earliest documented use: 1435.
_____________________________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
It's like, at the end, there's this surprise quiz: Am I proud of me? I gave my life to become the person I am right now. Was it worth what I paid? -Richard Bach, writer (b. 23 Jun 1936)
____________________________________

OMPUGN - a meditating Buddhist with a short fuse

OPPUGNU - the hybrid offspring of a small southeastern US marsupial and a wildebeest


Posted By: wofahulicodoc some pithy remarks - 06/25/15 01:24 AM

ENERVATE

PRONUNCIATION: (verb: EN-uhr-vayt, adj.: i-NUHR-vit)

MEANING: verb tr.: To deprive of strength or vitality.
adjective: Deprived of strength; Weakened.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin enervare (to weaken), from ex- (out) + nervus (sinew). Earliest documented use: 1603.

_____________________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Patriotism, n. Combustible rubbish ready to the torch of any one ambitious to illuminate his name. In Dr. Johnson's famous dictionary patriotism is defined as the last resort of a scoundrel. With all due respect to an enlightened but inferior lexicographer I beg to submit it is the first. -Ambrose Bierce, writer (24 Jun 1842-1914)
_____________________________

ENERVOTE - the Big Oil lobby

ENERGATE - the Enron affair was a Federal conspiracy
Posted By: wofahulicodoc some cross remarks - 06/26/15 01:44 AM

SPLENETIC

PRONUNCIATION: (spli-NET-ik)

MEANING: adjective: Bad-tempered; spiteful.

ETYMOLOGY: From spleen, from French esplen, from Latin splen, from Greek splen. Earliest documented use: 1398.

NOTES: In earlier times it was believed that four humors controlled human behavior and an imbalance resulted in disease. According to this thinking an excess of black bile secreted by the spleen resulted in melancholy or ill humor. Also, the spleen was considered to be the seat of emotions. To vent one's spleen was to vent one's anger.

_________________________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
The nationalist not only does not disapprove of atrocities committed by his own side, he has a remarkable capacity for not even hearing about them. -George Orwell, writer (25 Jun 1903-1950)
_________________________________

SPLENETHIC - unyielding grouchiness; the moral underpinning of current US politics

SELENETIC - moon-like

SPHENETIC - wedge-shaped
Posted By: wofahulicodoc let it all hang out - 06/26/15 01:34 PM

EVISCERATE

PRONUNCIATION: (i-VIS-uh-rayt)

MEANING: verb intr.:
1. To remove the entrails; to disembowel.
2. To deprive of essential parts; to weaken or to destroy.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin eviscerare (to disembowel), from ex- (out) + viscera (internal organs), plural of Latin viscus (flesh, internal organ). Earliest documented use: 1607.
________________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
I believe the greatest gift I can conceive of having from anyone is to be seen, heard, understood, and touched by them. The greatest gift I can give is to see, hear, understand, and touch another person. -Virginia Satir, psychotherapist and author (26 Jun 1916-1988)
_________________________

EVISCERANTE - That's my last chip; if I don't win this pot I'm flat broke

EVI'S CRATE - the used car Evi just bought

ELVISCERATE - Madame Tussaud's Waxworks has a new statue of The King, in his Graceland studio
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: let it all hang out - 06/29/15 04:52 PM

CONNATE

PRONUNCIATION: (KON-ayt, ko-NAYT)

MEANING: adjective:
1. Congenial.
2. Congenital.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin connasci (to be born with), from com- (with) nasci (to be born). Earliest documented use: 1641.
______________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral. -Antoine de Saint-Exupery, author and aviator (29 Jun 1900-1944)
______________________

CONMATE - any utterance for the specific purpose of getting laid (see FOREPLOY)
(with acknowledgement to the Washington Post Style Invitational contest)

CONNANTE - sitting down to a poker table in Hartford CT

CONNAVE -
1. partner in crime
2. an adjacent set of pews, in which church dissidents sit apart from the affirmers
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: let it all hang out - 07/01/15 12:45 AM

SORB

PRONUNCIATION: (sorb)

MEANING: verb intr.:
1. To take up and hold by absorption.
2. To take up and hold by adsorption.

NOTES: So what’s the difference between absorption and adsorption, besides a turned-around letter b? Absorption is when a substance is completely assimilated by another while in adsorption the substance deposits on the surface of another.

ETYMOLOGY: Back-formation from absorb, from Latin absorbere, from ab- (away) + sorbere (to suck). Earliest documented use: 1909.
____________________________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: Life is a jest, and all things show it, / I thought so once, and now I know it. -John Gay, poet and dramatist (30 Jun 1685-1732)
_________________________________

SORR - a brief apology

SORY - a half-hearted apology

SORI - Cyclops with conjunctivitis
Posted By: wofahulicodoc ewe auto know these - 07/02/15 01:36 AM

RAMBLE

PRONUNCIATION: (RAM-buhl)

MEANING:
verb intr.: 1. To talk in an aimless manner.
verb intr.: 2. To walk in an aimless manner.
noun: A leisurely, sometimes lengthy walk.

ETYMOLOGY: Probably from Middle Dutch rammelen (to wander about in heat, used of animals). Earliest documented use: 1443.
_________________________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: It is almost impossible to carry the torch of truth through a crowd without singeing somebody's beard. -Georg Christoph Lichtenberg, scientist and philosopher (1 Jul 1742-1799)
_________________________________

RAMABLE - like a bumper-car

RAMBLUE - the color of my new Dodge truck

RAMBYE - the St Louis football team has the week off
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: ewe auto know these - 07/02/15 05:52 PM

FARDEL

PRONUNCIATION: (FAHR-dl)

MEANING: noun:
1. A bundle.
2. A burden.

ETYMOLOGY: -- From Old French fardel, diminutive of farde (package, burden), from Arabic farda (piece, pack). Earliest documented use: 1300.
___________________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Some men look at constitutions with sanctimonious reverence, and deem them like the ark of the covenant, too sacred to be touched. They ascribe to the men of the preceding age a wisdom more than human, and suppose what they did to be beyond amendment. I knew that age well; I belonged to it, and labored with it. It deserved well of its country. It was very like the present, but without the experience of the present; and forty years of experience in government is worth a century of book-reading; and this they would say themselves, were they to rise from the dead. I am certainly not an advocate for frequent and untried changes in laws and constitutions. I think moderate imperfections had better be borne with; because, when once known, we accommodate ourselves to them, and find practical means of correcting their ill effects. But I know also, that laws and institutions must go hand in hand with the progress of the human mind. As that becomes more developed, more enlightened, as new discoveries are made, new truths disclosed, and manners and opinions change with the change of circumstances, institutions must advance also, and keep pace with the times. We might as well require a man to wear still the coat which fitted him when a boy, as civilized society to remain ever under the regimen of their barbarous ancestors. -Thomas Jefferson, 3rd US President (1743-1826)
___________________________

FARDEN -- a very distant herbarium with beautiful floral displays

FAIRDEL -- a little German horse

FARIEL -- a magical archangel
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: ewe auto know these - 07/03/15 12:31 PM

MAUNDER

PRONUNCIATION: (MON-duhr)

MEANING: verb intr.:
1. To talk aimlessly.
2. To walk aimlessly.

ETYMOLOGY: Of uncertain origin. Earliest documented use: 1622.
_______________________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: A book must be an axe for the frozen sea inside of us. -Franz Kafka, novelist (3 Jul 1883-1924)
_______________________________

MASUNDER - split Massachusetts into two independent regions

MAUIDER - a beverage made from fermented Hawaiian fruit

MAPUNDER - diagram of the London subway system
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: ewe auto know these - 07/03/15 03:27 PM
MEANDER a speed between 'mosey' and 'saunter'.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc perambulate - 07/03/15 03:40 PM

MANUNDER - keelhaul
Posted By: May Re: perambulate - 07/03/15 11:10 PM
Paunder- to think aimlessly.
(Kudos to my kiddo,David.)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc husband of maunder - 07/05/15 01:56 AM

Kudos indeed. Good thinking, David.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc no ax to grind - 07/06/15 12:34 PM

ACCIDENCE

PRONUNCIATION: (AK-si-dens)

MEANING: noun:
1. The fundamentals of any subject.
2. The branch of grammar dealing with inflections of words.
3. A book of fundamentals of a subject.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin accidentia (from Latin accidens), from accidere (to happen), from ad- (toward) + cadere (to fall). Ultimately from the Indo-European root kad- (to fall), which is also the source of cadence, cascade, casualty, cadaver, chance, chute, accident, occident, decay, recidivism, perchance, casuistry. Earliest documented use: 1434.
_______________________

OCCIDENCE - fundamentals of Western thought

ACCEDENCE - capitulation (pron.. ak-SEED-ence)

ACCIDENCH - Judi the Woodcutter

ACCIDUNCE - 1. unintended stupidity; 2. the latest Darwin Award winner
Posted By: May Re: ewe auto know these: Towanda! - 07/06/15 01:18 PM
Accident: (acc-I-dent)

Menopause Meaning: "Face it, girls, I'm older and I have more insurance."
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: ewe auto know these: Towanda! - 07/06/15 03:56 PM
Perfect, May, like the scene in "Fried Green Tomatoes"! Got to love it.
Posted By: May Re: ewe auto know these: Towanda! - 07/07/15 01:49 PM
Wofahulicodoc- with a big ol' grin, David said, "Cool, cool." smile

Luke- I've seen the movie many times and always enjoy it. The book is on my list of should reads. smile
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: ewe auto know these: Towanda! - 07/07/15 03:10 PM
One of my all time favorites as well, so much in it, so many
terrific scenes. Kathy Bates sets the table, hubby comes home
picks up chick and goes to watch he game: so stereotypical.
Et. al.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc I've been workin' on the railroad - 07/07/15 05:12 PM

LIVELONG

PRONUNCIATION: (LIV-long)

MEANING: adjective: Whole or entire (referring to time).

ETYMOLOGY: From Old English leof (dear, used as an intensifier) + lang (long). Ultimately from the Indo-European root gleubh- (to tear apart), which is also the source of cleve, glyph, clever, clove (garlic), cleave, dermatoglyphics, lief, and lubricious. Earliest documented use: 1450.
________________________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: Sin lies only in hurting others unnecessarily. All other "sins" are invented nonsense. -Robert A. Heinlein, science-fiction author (7 Jul 1907-1988)
________________________________

LIVELONE - hermit

DIVELONG - why SCUBA was invented

LIVEBONG - the hash is good here
Posted By: wofahulicodoc oh my... - 07/08/15 07:29 PM

BESPOKE

PRONUNCIATION: (bi-SPOHK)

MEANING: adjective:
1. Custom-made.
2. Relating to custom-made products.

ETYMOLOGY: Shortening of bespoken, past participle of bespeak (to speak for, to arrange), from Old English besprecan (to speak about). Earliest documented use: 1755.
__________________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: Should you shield the canyons from the windstorms you would never see the true beauty of their carvings. -Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, psychiatrist and author (8 Jul 1926-2004)
___________________________


BESTPOKE - any of several zingers by Larry or Curly or Moe

BESPORE - to dust with fern seeds

BESPOK - 1. to overwhelm with logic; 2. to bestow the Leonard Nimoy Award
Posted By: May Re: Mensopause III - 07/09/15 08:34 PM
Limpit- tip for a three legged race with a peg legged pirate.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc By George, she's got it ! - 07/10/15 02:06 AM

LIMPID

PRONUNCIATION: (LIM-pid)

MEANING: adjective:
1. Clear; transparent.
2. Easily comprehensible; clear.
3. Calm; serene.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin limpidus (clear). Earliest documented use: 1609.
_____________________________

LIMBID - how to tell an arm from a leg
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: By George, she's got it ! - 07/11/15 01:09 AM

TRIBOLOGY

PRONUNCIATION: (try-BOL-uh-jee, tri-)

MEANING: noun: The study of interacting surfaces in relative motion and associated issues, such as friction, lubrication, and wear.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek tribos (rubbing), from tribein (to rub). Earliest documented use: 1966.

NOTES: Usually words are coined on the streets of language, but here is one instance where a word may be considered to have been synthesized in a lab, if there could be such a thing as a word lab. In 1965, a group of lubrication engineers decided they needed a name for what they did and contacted the editors of the Oxford English Dictionary for help. Out of this came the word tribology, suggested by one C.G. Hardie of Magdalen College.
So even though it looks like the perfect word for it, tribology is not the study of tribes. A related term is triboelectricity: electricity generated by friction.
_______________________________

BRIBOLOGY - Congressional Lobbying for Dummies

TRIBOROGY - New York City toll collector

TERIBOLOGY - Handbook of Pessimism
Posted By: May Re: By George, she's got it ! - 07/11/15 05:51 PM
Triloboggy- a bog filled with trilobites
Triloboogie- earliest recorded music of the Early Cabrian period.
Trilobogeyman- an imaginary, prehistoric monster used to frighten misbehaving arthropods into good behavior. "And they died!"
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: By George, she's got it ! - 07/11/15 10:17 PM
TRIBOLOGNY - nonsense our people believe in.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: By George, she's got it ! - 07/11/15 10:50 PM

(That would be pronounced "tribe-baloney"?)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: By George, she's got it ! - 07/12/15 08:45 PM

TRIBBOLOGY - now you know the trouble with 'em ...


(see also here, thirty real-time years later )
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: By George, she's got it ! - 07/13/15 05:16 AM
Originally Posted By: wofahulicodoc

(That would be pronounced "tribe-baloney"?)


Precisely.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc add / delete / change one letter - 07/13/15 04:38 PM

LONGHAIR

PRONUNCIATION: (LONG-hair)

MEANING: noun:
1. An intellectual.
2. One having a deep interest in the arts, especially in classical music.
3. A male with long hair, especially a hippie.
4. A cat having long hair.

ETYMOLOGY: From Old English lang + haer. Earliest documented use: 1893.
_________________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: If life had a second edition, how I would correct the proofs. -John Clare, poet (13 Jul 1793-1864)
_________________________

LONCHAIR - what you sit on to watch Lawn Tennis

LONGHAIN - what you get from a 65-yard pass-and-run play (the H is silent)
Posted By: May Re: add / delete / change one letter - 07/13/15 08:03 PM
Loanhair- beautiful lengths

Longpair- stereochemically sad electrons with no friends frown
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: add / delete / change one letter - 07/14/15 03:38 AM
LONGHAR - very, very funny.
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: add / delete / change one letter - 07/14/15 04:11 PM
DONGHAIR

Click to reveal..
Naughty me.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: add / delete / change one letter - 07/14/15 05:52 PM

BLACKLEG

PRONUNCIATION: (BLAK-leg)

MEANING: noun:
1. One who works while other workers are on strike.
2. A swindler, especially in games such as gambling.
3. One of various diseases of plants or cattle.

ETYMOLOGY: It’s unclear how the term came to be employed for a strikebreaker. Earliest documented use: 1722.
______________________

CLACKLEG - playing the spoons on your prosthesis; sounds like castinets

BLANKLEG - a clean cast for your friends to sign

BACKLEG - what a dog marks his territory by raising
Posted By: wofahulicodoc mostly "right-pondianisms" - 07/15/15 03:01 PM

DOUBLE-DOME

PRONUNCIATION: (DUHB-uhl-dohm)

MEANING: noun: An intellectual.

ETYMOLOGY: From double + dome (slang for head). Earliest documented use: 1938.
__________________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Choose only one master -- Nature. -Rembrandt, painter and etcher (15 Jul 1606-1669)
__________________________

DOUBLED 'OME - scored from second base (Cockney pronunciation)

DOUBLEDOM - twinship

DOUBLE-DORE - Hogwarts Headmaster with a cold (British spelling, again)
Posted By: May Re: mostly "right-pondianisms" - 07/16/15 08:52 AM
Double-lome- hummus for two.

WHITE-LIVERED

PRONUNCIATION: (hwyt-LIV-uhrd)

MEANING:adjective: Cowardly.

ETYMOLOGY: From the former belief that a lack of vigor or courage was from a deficiency of bile which showed in a light-colored liver. Earliest documented use: 1546. Also known as lily-livered.
______________________________

WHITE-LIKE-RED - famed cardiologist enjoys wine with his meat

WHITE-LOVE-RED - same as above, only much more so

WHITE-LI-VERSED - ready with a small untruth
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Say it again - 07/17/15 12:56 PM

DITTOHEAD

PRONUNCIATION: (DIT-oh-head)

MEANING: noun: One who mindlessly agrees with an idea or opinion.

ETYMOLOGY: After callers on the talk radio program Rush Limbaugh Show who often unquestioningly agree with the radio host. The word began as a term to describe listeners to the show who would agree with the previous caller’s effusive praise of Limbaugh with the word “ditto”. From ditto (same, likewise), from Italian (Tuscan dialect ditto) detto (said, above-mentioned), from Latin dictus (said), from dicere (to say). Ultimately from the Indo-European root deik- (to show, to pronounce solemnly), which also gave us judge, verdict, vendetta, revenge, indicate, dictate, paradigm, diktat, fatidic, hoosegow, interdict, retrodiction. Earliest documented use: 1989.

_______________________________

DITTOHEAR - an "earworm;" a song you can't get out of your mind

DITTYHEAD - writer of advertising jingles

DICTOHEAD - CEO of Dragon Incorporated

Posted By: May Re: Say it again - 07/17/15 05:38 PM
Dittocred-Yeah, what he said.
Posted By: May Re: Say it again - 07/17/15 05:44 PM
Dittofed- the ditto enforcement

Dittobled- I shot the sheriff
Posted By: May The drive to work - 07/20/15 08:56 AM
U2
Sunday Bloody Sunday

(Tgim!)
Posted By: May Tangled Up In Bleu - 07/20/15 08:58 AM
Mutonian- koanhead from Muto
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Far, far away - 07/20/15 12:50 PM

PLUTONIAN

PRONUNCIATION: ploo-TOH-nee-uhn)

MEANING: m adjective:
1. Relating to the dwarf planet Pluto.
2. Relating to Pluto, the god of the underworld in the Greek mythology.
3. Relating to the underworld.

ETYMOLOGY: Via Latin from Greek Plouton (Pluto, the god of the underworld). Earliest documented use: 1604.
____________________________________

BLUTONIAN - thuggish (from a character in Popeye)

PNUTONIAN - classical physics (the P is silent, like the pee in "pswimming")

PLUTONIN - Anais' little brother, disinherited a couple of years ago. New pictures of him have recently appeared, taken by some fly-by-night outfit.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc partner of Aquaman? - 07/21/15 04:19 PM

HYDRA

PRONUNCIATION: (HY-druh)

MEANING: noun: A persistent or multifaceted problem that presents a new obstacle when a part of it is solved.

ETYMOLOGY: After the many-headed monster Hydra in Greek mythology. When its one head was cut off, it sprouted two more. It was ultimately slain by Hercules. From Latin Hydra, from Greek Hudra (water snake). Ultimately from the Indo-European root wed- (water, wet), which also gave us water, wash, winter, hydrant, redundant, otter, and vodka. Earliest documented use: 1374.
____________________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: Never think that war, no matter how necessary, nor how justified, is not a crime. Ask the infantry and ask the dead. -Ernest Hemingway, author and journalist, Nobel laureate (21 Jul 1899-1961)
_____________________________

HI, DRA - Crabbe and Goyle being unacceptably familiar with young Malfoy

HYBRA - an uplifting undergarment preferred by Madonna

HYDRY - stranded

Posted By: wofahulicodoc a.k.a. "Fluffy" - 07/22/15 05:04 PM

CERBERUS

PRONUNCIATION: (SUHR-buhr-uhs)

MEANING: noun: A powerful, hostile guard.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin, from Greek Kerberos. Earliest documented use: 1386.

NOTES: Cerberus (also Kerberos) was the three-headed dog that guarded the entrance to Hades, the infernal region in classical mythology. Ancient Greeks and Romans used to put a slice of cake in the hands of their dead to help pacify Cerberus on the way. This custom gave rise to the idiom “to give a sop to Cerberus” meaning to give a bribe to quiet a troublesome person.
Cancerbero (from Spanish can: dog) is one of the Spanish terms for a goalkeeper in fútbol (football). Kerberos is the name given to an authentication protocol for computer networks.
_______________________________

ACERBERUS - given to tossing out sharp-tongued witticisms

CARBERUS - pertaining to old-time fuel-injection systems

CURBERUS - Big-box chain of stores that sell Pooper-Scoopers and other pick-up-after-your-dog supplies
Posted By: May Re: partner of Aquaman? - 07/22/15 05:05 PM
Cereus-br ~ Queen of the Night
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Knocturn Aley is next to Diagon Alley - 07/23/15 05:34 PM

NOCTURNAL

PRONUNCIATION: (nok-TUHR-nuhl)

MEANING: adjective: Relating to, happening, or active at night.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin nocturnalis (of the night), from nox (night). Earliest documented use: 1485.

NOTES: Pluto’s moon Nix is named after Nyx, the ancient Greek goddess personifying night. In Roman mythology she’s known as Nox. The Latin word for night, nox, also appears in such words as equinox (equal day and night) and noctambulation (sleepwalking).
_____________________________


NOCHURNAL - sorry, we're all out of butter

NOCTURINAL - gets up at night to empty the bladder

NO-TURNAL - no ueys allowed
Posted By: May F-Troop (with a bang and a boom) - 07/24/15 06:33 PM
Styngian- wise saying ie: "when field mouse sees his shadow, time to string beads." ~ Chief Standing Bull
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: F-Troop (with a bang and a boom) - 07/24/15 08:03 PM
STYRGIAN - Like the dark, gloomy, and hellish flavor of caviar.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: F-Troop (with a bang and a boom) - 07/25/15 12:17 AM

STYGIAN

PRONUNCIATION: (STIJ-ee-uhn)

MEANING: adjective:
1. Dark or gloomy.
2. Hellish.
3. Unbreakable or completely binding (said of an oath).
4. Relating to the river Styx.

ETYMOLOGY: In Greek mythology Styx was a river in the underworld over which souls of the dead were ferried by Charon (after whom Pluto’s largest moon is named). Styx was also the river by which oaths were sworn that even gods were afraid to break. The word is from Latin Stygius, from Greek Stygios, from Styx (the hateful). Earliest documented use: 1566.

________________________________

STYGIANT - Alpha-boar

STYLIAN - prepare a new outfit for James Bond's author

STAYGIAN - You will join us for dinner, won't you, Mr. Menotti !?
Posted By: May Re: F-Troop (with a bang and a boom) - 07/26/15 04:40 PM
Yikes! Looks like your styrgian went roegue.

P.S. hellabaluga
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: F-Troop (with a bang and a boom) - 07/26/15 04:59 PM
STAYGIAN - You will join us for dinner, won't you, Mr. Menotti !?
grin



STYXIAN When I get too close to my bed of cacti
Posted By: wofahulicodoc unavoidable - 07/28/15 02:57 AM

TOHUBOHU

PRONUNCIATION: (TOH-hoo-BO-hoo)

MEANING: noun: Chaos; confusion.

ETYMOLOGY: From Hebrew tohu wa-bhohu, from tohu (formlessness) and bhohu (emptiness). Earliest documented use: 1619.
________________________

TOFUBOHU - formless bean curd, full of empty calories

TOHUBOOHU - You gave it to the former president of China? Oh, woe!
Posted By: May Re: eye told you - 07/28/15 11:47 AM
Hehemoth- funny man from Point Pleasant
Posted By: wofahulicodoc tiger tiger burning bright - 07/28/15 10:02 PM

BEHEMOTH

PRONUNCIATION: (bi-HEE-muth, BEE-uh-)

MEANING: noun:
1. A huge or monstrous creature.
2. Something large and powerful, as an organization.

ETYMOLOGY: From Hebrew behemoth, plural of behemah (beast). Earliest documented use: 1382. Behemoth is a huge beast mentioned in the Book of Job 40:15-24.

___________________________

BE THE MOTH - You too can flit around near lights...but don't get too close!

BEHEMONTH - Just what is Julius Caesar? or is it Augustus?
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Go Back Three Spaces - 07/28/15 10:05 PM

Speaking of the former president of China, did you catch this little gem the first time around?
Posted By: wofahulicodoc hosted by Jerry Levis ? - 07/29/15 07:16 PM

LEVIATHAN

PRONUNCIATION: (li-VY-uh-thuhn)

MEANING: noun: Something large and powerful.

ETYMOLOGY: Via Latin from Hebrew liwyathan (whale). Earliest documented use: 1382.
_________________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: A happy marriage is the union of two good forgivers. -Robert Quillen, journalist and cartoonist (1887-1948)
_________________________

LEVIATHON - an all-day fund-raiser for the benefit of the Save-the-Whales foundation
Posted By: May The Yard Sale Kid - 07/29/15 07:21 PM
Ifleviathen- never park here ever, idiot
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Block those UV rays! - 07/29/15 09:08 PM

Le Via tan - skin pigmentation from walking Italian roads

MANNA

PRONUNCIATION: (MAN-uh)

MEANING: noun: An unexpected help, benefit, or advantage.

ETYMOLOGY: Via Latin and Greek from Hebew man (manna). In the Bible manna was the food supplied to the Israelites by the heavens during their wandering in the desert. Earliest documented use: mid 5th century.
__________________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: A business that makes nothing but money is a poor business. -Henry Ford, industrialist (30 Jul 1863-1947)
__________________________

MANUA (pron. ma-NOO-a) - organic fertilizer made in Boston

MANNAX - prohibits transporting chopped-down trees across state lines
Posted By: May The Little Engine That Could - 07/30/15 10:02 PM
Man n/a - dude ex machina
Posted By: wofahulicodoc opr Hell, either - 07/31/15 05:09 PM

GEHENNA

PRONUNCIATION: (gi-HEN-uh)

MEANING: noun:
1. Hell.
2. Any place of extreme torture or suffering.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin gehenna, from Greek Geenna, from Hebrew ge-hinnom (hell), literally, the valley of Hinnom, or from ge ben Hinnom (valley of the son of Hinnom). It’s not clear who this Hinnom fellow was. In the Bible, the valley was known as a place of child sacrifice. Ultimately, this word is from the same Semitic root that gave Arabic jahannam (hell) which, in Hindi, became jahannum. Earliest documented use: 1594.

_______________________

GO HENNA ! - the cheer of the University of Natural Red-brown Dye Coloring

GESENNA - aphasic response to a sneeze

GE-THENNA - past participle of the Greek goddess of reason, intelligent activity, and arts
Posted By: LukeJavan8 - - -way to go, Sis - 07/31/15 05:12 PM
REHENNA Rihanna's sister
(sorry if I did not spell her name right, I'm not a fan.)
Posted By: May The Emperor's New Groove - 08/01/15 03:52 PM
Ghana- marijuana, not to be confused with Mande "warrior king"

regehanna- colloquial apology to the king (ya, man...don't worry, be happy)





Posted By: May Re: The Emperor's New Groove - 08/01/15 04:22 PM
"Matisyahu's lyrics are mostly English with more than occasional use of Hebrew and Yiddish."

I was playing with ideas for a bakery (placebo effect) and was looking up marijuana slang when I found ghana. Then I started a wiki journey....sort of comes back around to Hebrew and yiddish (akeda and ayeka).

I think I'm supposed to use Jahman instead of ya, man.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc euphemisms - Monday - 08/03/15 04:42 PM

MICTURATE

PRONUNCIATION: (MIK-chuh-rayt, MIK-tuh-)

MEANING: verb intr.: To urinate.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin micturire (to want to urinate), from meiere (to urinate). Ultimately from the Indo-European root meigh- (to urinate), which also gave us mist, thrush, and mistletoe. Earliest documented use: 1842.

__________________________________

MICTURANTE - start a pot to piss in

M.I. CURATE - tells you just how bad your heart attack was

MICKURATE - the Mouse is simply the best !
Posted By: May Re: euphemisms - Monday - 08/03/15 09:52 PM
Micurate- a mile long list of sifted, sorted and curated words

Picturate- the 'picture this' awards
Posted By: May Re: euphemisms - Monday - 08/04/15 01:27 AM


"MICKURATE - the Mouse is simply the best !

I was perusing the word curate when I found "take the mickey" at the end of the following blog post. Curious, often to a fault, I wanted to see what it meant.

[/quote]"https://ondermynende.wordpress.com/2012/11/04/detestable-neologisms-curate-as-a-verb/

I love it when this happens...." To take the piss."

https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/take_the_mickey

Any connection to your mouse?
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: euphemisms - Monday - 08/04/15 01:58 AM
To me the Mickey one takes is a Mickey Finn, 1920s slang implying knockout drops placed in someone's drink unperceived,,as in "slip him a Mickey." Elliott Paul once wrote a mystery titled "The Mysterious Mickey Finn" - a very funny mystery too, I might add).

Taking a MIckey, meaning mocking or indicating disrespect, is a wholly different use.

And to call something "Mickey-Mouse" the adjective is disparaging, implying cheap and impromptu and perhaps fragile (and short-lived) construction. I don't know whether it came from Disney's mouse (who was originally "Steamboat Willie," as I recall; the mouse name didn't come until later) or the other way 'round...

[Oh, btw, congratulations on your promotion - you are now officially no longer a Newbie ! ]
Posted By: May Re: euphemisms - Monday - 08/04/15 02:08 PM
Sounds like "mischief" to me.

Thank you for the response. Very interesting.

(Now my children won't hang their heads for me. Terrible thing to be a "noob.")
Posted By: May Re - 08/04/15 02:18 PM
Oscolate- coffee with chocolate undertones made by chemex
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: euphemisms - Tuesday - 08/04/15 03:08 PM

OSCULATE

PRONUNCIATION: (OS-kyuh-layt)

MEANING:
verb tr.: To kiss.
verb intr.: To touch or to bring together.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin osculatus, past participle of osculari (to kiss), from osculum (kiss; literally, little mouth), diminutive form of os (mouth). Ultimately from the Indo-European root os- (mouth), which also gave us usher, oral, orifice, oscillate, os, and ostiary. Earliest documented use: 1656.

____________________

OSCULITE - butterfly kisses

OSCURATE - a bloviating clergyman, who habitually runs on at the mouth

OBSCULATE - an excuse meant to hide why I didn't get home until 3AM
Posted By: May Re: Ru Roh Raggy! - 08/05/15 08:30 PM
Rerurgitate-Arctic Scooby Snack
Posted By: May Re: Classical French Training - 08/05/15 09:05 PM
Preregurgitate- long range surveillance restaurant review

(Malarkey~ Searsucker~ milk and sugar~ "a Nerkle, a Nerd and a Seersucker too"~ "Ermahgerd Sundae"~ Green Eggs and Ham~ Peter Rabbit~ whimsy and fun)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: euphemisms - Wednesday - 08/06/15 01:56 AM

REGURGITATE

PRONUNCIATION: (ri-GUHR-ji-tayt)

MEANING: verb tr.:
1. To bring up undigested food through the mouth.
2. To repeat something without understanding it.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin regurgitare (to overflow or flow back), from re- (again) + gurgitare (to flood), from gurges (whirlpool). Earliest documented use: 1578.

_________________________

REGURGILATE - symptom of heavy-metal poisoning; you don't feel bad until many hours after ingestion. Watch out for it at the company picnic if they serve lemonade out of a galvanized iron trash can, even if it's never been used before (the acid in the lemonade dissolves the zinc coating on the can...and you drink it)

REGURGITAT - a cruel fraternity prank: a tattoo with special ink that makes you toss your lunch

REGUGGITATE - to form a new art conglomerate by merging a famous NYC museum with a renowned London gallery
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: euphemisms - Thursday - 08/06/15 01:13 PM
MASTICATE

PRONUNCIATION: (MAS-ti-kayt)

MEANING: verb tr., intr.:
1. To chew.
2. To reduce to pulp by crushing and grinding.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin masticare (to chew), from Greek mastikhan (to gnash the teeth). Earliest documented use: 1562. A synonym of this word is fletcherize.

________________________

MASTICASTE - Brahmin

MASSICATE
1. wholesale drying
2. a very dry Catholic religious service

MASTICALE
1. vegetables grown in the Crow's Nest
2. this beer tastes like glue
Posted By: May Cerveza Con Caracter - 08/06/15 10:40 PM
Mastecate- more beer (Chavez-esque)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Cerveza Con Caracter - 08/07/15 12:42 AM
Originally Posted By: May
Mastecate- more beer (Chavez-esque)


¡Aha! ¡Me gusta!
Posted By: wofahulicodoc but I'm on a diet... - 08/07/15 05:21 PM

..so why did all the words this week end in "ate" ? That's noe what "Latinate" is supposed to mean !
_______________________

EXUNGULATE

PRONUNCIATION: (ek-SUNG-uh-layt)

MEANING: verb tr.: To pare nails, claws, etc.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin exungulare (to lose the hoof), from ex- (out) + ungula (claw, nail, hoof, talon, etc.). Earliest documented use: 1623.

______________________

EX-UNC U LATE - my aunt's former husband didn't get here on time

EXANGULATE - used to have sharp pointy corners, but not any more

REXUNGULATE - another name for Satan, the hoofed King of the Nether Regions
Posted By: wofahulicodoc re: Mensopause - 08/07/15 05:22 PM

PS I'll be away for the key board next week - please carry on without me :-)
Posted By: May How High The Moon - 08/07/15 10:57 PM
Exdungulate- out of scat (boo bi yoo bi
bi yu di di ooh dun)

exPUNgulate- capital punishment (please forgive me)
Posted By: May Re: How High The Moon - 08/07/15 11:12 PM
https://youtu.be/98qw86DsdZ0

They found Alice.
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: How High The Moon - 08/07/15 11:42 PM
Thanks for that terrific memory.
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: How High The Moon - 08/08/15 08:53 PM
Never apologize for puns. Hoist them high and proud on the breeze, and we will salute them unflaggingly.
Posted By: May Re: How High The Moon - 08/10/15 04:09 PM
smile
Posted By: May Virginia - 08/10/15 04:27 PM
Saturnaluau- planet hopping parties with cronuts at every feast.
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: Virginia - 08/10/15 11:52 PM
SATURLALIA: inability to speak correctly on weekends.
Posted By: May Dagwood Bumstead - 08/11/15 01:59 PM
Meateoric- full of and pertaining to meat

Gee Mr. B, that sandwich is positively meateoric.
Posted By: Tromboniator Vows? What vows? - 08/11/15 07:01 PM
MATEORIC — what a passionate but short-lived marriage is.
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Vows? What vows? - 08/12/15 12:37 AM
DATEORIC That love at first site meeting that caused the
above, Peter.
Posted By: May Honyock: How To Pick Up Chicks - 08/12/15 03:43 PM
Henery- a henhouse, a place of residence for hens.

Get thee to a henery, why wouldst thou be a breeder of sinners- 1601: Chanticleer, Chicklet
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Honyock: How To Pick Up Chicks - 08/12/15 03:59 PM
JENERY Bruce/Caitlyn family gathering, including rabbit named
Bruce.
Posted By: May Steampunk - 08/12/15 09:11 PM
Veinery- establishment for the sophisticated vampire


(https://youtu.be/V2yqpsxV2a8)
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Steampunk - 08/12/15 09:43 PM
laugh
Posted By: May Re: Steampunk - 08/13/15 12:52 AM
Vennery- strange loops ( (Translation- language and consciousness) )

So interesting to me. Order of discovery:
Chauntecleer.....

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2...r-is-a-computer

Chauntecleer-English words first attested in Chaucer-Aureate-Inkhorn terms-uncleftish beholding-Le Ton beau de Marot-machine translation- !
Posted By: May Logic will get you from a to b - 08/14/15 08:34 PM
Conptellate- full of silence

Conptellate- a formation of flying reptiles with advanced communication skills, a.k.a. Jurassic flyby
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Just the very thing I wanted! - 08/17/15 04:15 PM

AD HOC

PRONUNCIATION: (ad HOK)

MEANING: adverb, adjective: For a particular purpose only (as opposed to a wider application); impromptu.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin ad hoc (for this). Earliest documented use: 1639.

____________________________

AD HIC - this plus a singultus

DAD HOC - Father can't afford your college tuition

AB HOC - from Latin, "away from this". Easily distracted; does everything EXCEPT the task at hand.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Just the very thing I wanted! - 08/18/15 07:45 PM

WHEREWITH

PRONUNCIATION: (hwer-WITH)

MEANING:
adverb: With which.
pronoun: The thing(s) with which.
conjunction: By means of which.

ETYMOLOGY: From where + with. Earliest documented use: 1200.

__________________________________

WHEREWISH - what the Genie of the Lamp at the travel agency asks you

WHEREDITH - first name of Mr. Milson, who collaborated with the Rev. William Spooner to write the Broadway show "The Manic Muse" (ref. upon request)

Posted By: Tromboniator Re: Just the very thing I wanted! - 08/18/15 08:01 PM
Originally Posted By: wofahulicodoc



WHEREDITH - first name of Mr. Milson, who collaborated with the Rev. William Spooner to write the Broadway show "The Manic Muse" (ref. upon request)



We've got rubble
Right here in Triver City.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc ;-) - 08/18/15 08:11 PM

Originally Posted By: Tromboniator
Originally Posted By: wofahulicodoc
WHEREDITH - first name of Mr. Milson, who collaborated with the Rev. William Spooner to write the Broadway show "The Manic Muse" (ref. upon request)

We've got rubble
Right here in Triver City.

You must have read about it in Captain Willy's Biz Bang...
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: Just the very thing I wanted! - 08/18/15 08:13 PM
WHEREWIT: subpar comedian.

WHEEWITH: Let's ride the roller coaster!

WHEREWITCH: Look under the house.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Perish the thought ! - 08/20/15 12:53 AM

INTER ALIA

PRONUNCIATION: (IN-tuhr AY-lee-uh, AH-)

MEANING: adverb: Among other things.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin inter (among) + alius (other). Earliest documented use: 1665.
__________________________

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY: The door of a bigoted mind opens outwards so that the only result of the pressure of facts upon it is to close it more snugly. -Ogden Nash, poet (19 Aug 1902-1971)
__________________________

INTERALIAS - a death in the Witness Protection program

INTERALGIA - the blessed pain-free interval between labor contractions

INTERNALIA - a orgy of first-year medical residents
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: Perish the thought ! - 08/20/15 04:01 AM
INFER ALIA:behave like a conspiracy theorist

ENTER ALIA: stage direction for the party scene
Posted By: LukeJavan8 - - Perish the thought ! or just Perish - 08/20/15 03:25 PM
INTER TALIA she was a lovely old gal.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Perish the thought ! - 08/20/15 05:07 PM

ATHWART

PRONUNCIATION: (uh-THWART)

MEANING: adverb, preposition: From side to side of; across; against.

ETYMOLOGY: From a- (on, into, toward) + thwart, from Old Norse thvert, neuter of thverr (transverse). Earliest documented use: 1470.

______________________________

MATHWART - the super-nerd in Advanced Non-Euclidean Geometries class

OATHWART - two ingredients of magic and spells

ATHEART - where we're all children
Posted By: wofahulicodoc To each his own - 08/21/15 12:40 PM

PRO RATA

PRONUNCIATION: (pro RAY-tuh, RAH-)

MEANING:
adverb: Proportionally.
adjective: Proportional.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin pro rata (according to the calculated share). Earliest documented use: 1575.

___________________________

PYRO RATA - How good an arsonist are you?

PRE RATA - The Motion Picture Asociation hasn't given it a letter yet

PRIORATA - past mistakes
Posted By: May Re: World's Greatest Criminal Mind - 08/22/15 01:52 PM
Pro Rat- a big mouse (Professor Padraic Ratigan)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc flowery language - 08/25/15 01:46 AM

LORELEI

PRONUNCIATION: (LOR-uh-ly)

MEANING: noun: A dangerously seductive woman.

ETYMOLOGY: In German legend Lorelei was a nymph who sat on a rock of the same name on the Rhine river. Her songs lured sailors to their destruction on the rock. Earliest documented use: 1878. Also see siren, Mata Hari, and Circe.
____________________

LOBELEI - two of them.
( Lobelia /lɵˈbiːliə/ is a genus of flowering plants comprising 415 species, with a subcosmopolitan distribution primarily in tropical to warm temperate regions of the world, a few species extending into cooler temperate regions. (Wikipedia) )

LOSELEI - I can't find the flower garland they gave me on Oahu!
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: flowery language - 08/25/15 06:35 AM
LORELET – a dangerous thing (a little bit of knowledge…)
Posted By: May Allumette - 08/25/15 01:37 PM
Faul fry- a soggy french fry

- An expletive used when your
Survival matches get wet

p.s. the echo of the day~ Allumette (Echo Park), a restaurant that closed last year, served a drink by the name of Poire Little Rich Boy; a funny play on words.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Allumette - 08/26/15 01:38 AM

PAUL PRY

PRONUNCIATION: (paul pry)

MEANING: noun: An excessively inquisitive person.

ETYMOLOGY: From a character in the comedic play Paul Pry by John Poole (1786-1872). Earliest documented use: 1826. Also see nosy parker.

____________________________

PAUL PRAY - what the former Pope did

PAL PRY - my nosy friend

PAUPRY - I ain't got no mony
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Allumette - 08/26/15 11:16 AM

BOYCOTT

PRONUNCIATION: (BOI-kot)

MEANING:
verb tr.: To protest by refusing to buy a product or to deal with a person, organization, nation, etc.
noun: The practice or an instance of this.

ETYMOLOGY: After Charles C. Boycott (1832-1897), an English land agent in Ireland, who was ostracized for refusing to lower rents during a time of poor harvest. Earliest documented use: 1880.
___________________________

BOYNOTT - Bruce Jenner

BOBCOTT - a lynx with a Caribbean accent

BOSCOTT - what you get if you cross a Bosc pear with a Grampa Ott morning glory
Posted By: wofahulicodoc It ism funny, you know - 08/27/15 02:09 PM

CHAUVINISM

PRONUNCIATION: (SHO-vuh-niz-uhm)

MEANING: noun: The belief in the superiority of one’s country, group, gender, etc.

ETYMOLOGY: After Nicolas Chauvin, a legendary French soldier in Napoleon’s army, noted for his fanatical patriotism. The figure of Nicolas Chauvin was popularized in the play La Cocarde Tricolore by the Cogniard brothers. Earliest documented use: 1870
____________________________

ACHAUVINISM - belief in sneezing

COHAUVINISM - belief in doing things by halves, knowing that two halves makes a whole

CHAVINISM - belief in potato soup
____________________________

I sure hope Anu doesn't pick "Gerrymander" for tomorrow's word...
Posted By: May Re: It ism funny, you know - 08/28/15 03:13 PM
Lovemace- Aurignacian stone tool used primarily in mating ceremonies, often accompanied by hair pulling into the cave

Lovemace #9- potion derived from the Aril of nutmeg

LoveMACE- the telescope will be the second-largest gamma ray telescope in the world and will help the scientific community enhance its understanding in the field of love
Posted By: wofahulicodoc tatting is my passion - 08/28/15 07:27 PM
Nice, May !
____________________________

LOVELACE

PRONUNCIATION: (LUV-lays)

MEANING: noun: A seducer; a licentious man.

ETYMOLOGY: After Robert Lovelace, a dissolute character in Samuel Richardson’s novel Clarissa (1748). Earliest documented use: 1751. Other eponyms with similar senses are Casanova, Don Juan, and Romeo.
____________________________

LOVELACK - a licentious literary character's underlying motivation, often

LOVERACE - a licentious piano player and showman from 1950s TV - "Where's my candelabra?"

LOVELUCE - a not-particularly-licentious TV sitcom from the same era
Posted By: May Re: tatting is my passion - 08/29/15 08:59 AM
The sweetest tongue has the sharpest tooth....my what big eyes you have. Lol
Posted By: May Re: tatting is my passion - 08/29/15 08:32 PM
North wind

Otchi Chyorna...red cape...France
https://youtu.be/JQFEPydwJ0s

Boycott Immorality-
https://youtu.be/U-tv250YkXE

Chinny-chin chin (wait for it)
https://youtu.be/yosQUBdfwzU
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Dark Eyes - 08/29/15 09:15 PM

...Wow!

That's a far cry from Liberace !

Wish my Russian was good enough to understand the writing in the bar.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc The Frouble with Fribbles - 08/31/15 01:02 PM

FRIBBLE

PRONUNCIATION: (FRIB-uhl)

MEANING:
verb intr.: To act in a wasteful or frivolous manner.
verb tr.: To fritter away.
noun: A wasteful or frivolous person or thing.

ETYMOLOGY: Of uncertain origin. Perhaps an alteration of frivol (to behave frivolously), from Latin frivolus (worthless). Earliest documented use: 1610.
_______________________________

FRABBLE - a board game for wordlovers with a speech impediment

FIBBLE - a small falsehood

FRIBBLE® - trademarked name for a large, thick milkshake-like cold drink, sold by the Newport Creamery company (and for a while by the Friendly's chain: drink three, get a fourth one free!)
Posted By: May Re: Dark Eyes - 09/01/15 12:36 PM
Originally Posted By: wofahulicodoc

...Wow!

That's a far cry from Liberace !

Wish my Russian was good enough to understand the writing in the bar.


I don't know anything about any of you. It's difficult to know how to write with anything but imagination.

I took "tatting" and bumped into a big eye....that, combined with "wofa" inspired "the big, bad wolf." It seemed to have a "connection" to the "theme." Anyway....little boat from tatting.
Posted By: May Re: The Frouble with Fribbles - 09/01/15 12:48 PM
....they can give you brain freeze?

Bepie- to do the impossible
Telie- tasseography gone wrong
Belit- turned up and popping
Posted By: wofahulicodoc back to back, and Belie to Belie - 09/01/15 07:55 PM

BELIE

PRONUNCIATION: (bi-LY)

MEANING: verb tr.:
1. To give a false impression: misrepresent.
2. To show to be false: contradict

ETYMOLOGY: From Old English beleogan (to deceive by lying). Earliest documented use: before 1000.

_______________________________

BELIE - the second-best place to leave your golf ball for you next shot

BELITE - 1. where you go Loo, all on a Saturday night
2. If you're trying to be serious, don't this

EBELIE - a Brother who sang "Bye, Bye, Love"
Posted By: wofahulicodoc I don't see it - 09/02/15 12:59 PM

DESCRY

PRONUNCIATION: (di-SKRY)

MEANING: verb tr.:
1. To catch sight of.
2. To discover or detect.

ETYMOLOGY: From Old French descrier (to cry out), from crier (to cry), from Latin critare, from quiritare (to cry out). Earliest documented use: before 1400. A shortening of the word descry resulted in scry.
________________________

DECRY - to take out the lachrymal glands

DESCARY - to make less frightful

DESPRY - 1. to render no longer lithe or limber
2. to remove the shortening
Posted By: May Re: I saw anything - 09/02/15 03:44 PM
DEscry- nobody saw anything

Despry- elixer of youth with the age old adage, "You're old only when you forget you're young," on the label
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: I don't see it - 09/02/15 03:53 PM
DESPY-remove a CIA agent
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: I don't see it - 09/04/15 01:49 AM

COSSET

PRONUNCIATION: (KOS-et)

MEANING:
verb tr.: To pamper.
noun: A pet; a spoiled child.

ETYMOLOGY: Of uncertain origin, probably from Old English cotsaeta (cot sitter or cot dweller). Ultimately from the Indo-European root sed- (to sit), which is also the source of sit, chair, saddle, assess, sediment, soot, cathedral, tetrahedron, sessile, surcease, assiduous, and eyas. Earliest documented use: 1579
______________________________

COSHET - a small blackjack (for knocking out midgets)

COWSET - winning six games of bovine tennis

FOSSET - source of running water

Posted By: May Namascray - 09/04/15 01:57 PM
Coset- is a fictional character in the movie adaptation of Les Miserables, directed by Baz Luhrmann

Warning:( https://youtu.be/kYa6G-LH1eE )

Closset- a private, small room for fifi and fido's socks.
Posted By: May It pays to be ignorant - 09/04/15 02:27 PM
Bigleaguer- comedy team Abbott and Costello
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: It pays to be ignorant - 09/04/15 08:12 PM

BELEAGUER

PRONUNCIATION: (bi-LEE-guhr)

MEANING: verb tr.:
1. To surround with troops.
2. To beset with difficulties.

ETYMOLOGY: From Dutch belegeren (to camp around), from be- (around) + leger (camp). Ultimately from the Indo-European root legh- (to lie or lay), which also gave us lie, lay, lair, fellow, and laager. Earliest documented use: 1589.
____________________________

B LEAGUER - not quite good enough for the majors

BENE AGUER - a disease that afflicts its victims with fevers and aches that paradoxically are good

BELE AUER - actor Mischa's wife
Posted By: May Dance like nobody's watching - 09/07/15 06:18 PM
Quitxote- to stop dancing
Posted By: May Negative space - 09/08/15 10:33 AM
Sanscho- without measure
Posted By: wofahulicodoc and a dollar short - 09/08/15 05:41 PM

QUIXOTE

PRONUNCIATION: (kee-HO-tee, -tay, KWIK-suht)

MEANING: noun: Someone who is unrealistic, naive, chivalrous, idealistic, etc. to an absurd degree.

ETYMOLOGY: After Don Quixote, hero of the eponymous novel by Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616). Earliest documented use: 1644. The adjectival form is quixotic.
____________________________

QUIKOTE - new fast-drying paint

QUIQUOTE - the Faster Bartlett

QUIXOSE - an enzyme that digests QUIX (whatever that is)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc (moving right along) - 09/08/15 06:00 PM

SANCHO PANZA

PRONUNCIATION: (SAN-cho)

MEANING: noun: A companion or sidekick, especially one who joins another in an adventure.

ETYMOLOGY: From Sancho Panza, the squire of Don Quixote. Sancho’s common sense contrasts with Don Quixote’s idealism. Earliest documented use: 1870.
_____________________________

Did you know that Sancho sang a lot during his adventures with Don Quixote?
SANCHO LANZA

No, no, not the tenor, the basso of that Enchanted Evening.
SANCHO PINZA

And he became very pious and holy after the Don passed away -
SANCTO PANZA

Years later he was reincarnated as the sidekick of the son of that Computer Network equipment magnate -- you know, the Cisco kid.
PANCHO
Posted By: LukeJavan8 - - -sorry, I forgot where I was going. - 09/09/15 12:10 AM
DUIXOTE where driving under the influence....

DULCINEA

PRONUNCIATION: (duhl-SIN-ee-uh)

MEANING: noun: A ladylove or sweetheart.

ETYMOLOGY: From Dulcinea del Toboso, the mistress of Don Quixote. The name is derived from Spanish dulce (sweet) from Latin dulce (sweet) which also gave us dulcimer (a musical instrument), billet-doux (love letter), and dolce (softly, as in music direction). Earliest documented use: 1748.

_____________________________


DUNCINEA - stupid emphasis added

SULCINEA - grooves in the National Endowment for the Arts

DULCIKEA - sweet furniture (some assembly required)

______________________________


P.S. Dulcinea was never a sweetheart or mistress, more the unattainable ideal that inspired Don Q to do Noble and Valiant and Worthy Deeds. Plenty of unilateral declaration of unswerving loyalty and devotion, but no mutual interaction.


DULLCINEA-that inevitable person on the plane in the seat next
to you.

BULCINEA-Person on a cell phone and everyone can hear for
miles around, bull horn-like

CULCINEAThe ideal that one has to weed out idiots.
DULCINEMA For me any film with Tom Cruise
Posted By: May Re: I have sought thee, sung thee, dreamed thee - 09/09/15 04:39 PM
Dul-cinema- (Aromanian English) movie usher

Dul-cinema- (Scottish Gaelic English)
The Surprising Adventures of Baron Munchausen
Posted By: May Re: I have sought thee, sung thee, dreamed thee - 09/10/15 01:48 PM
Slothario- a fictional character in the adaptation of against idleness and mischief, written by the devil

LOTHARIO

PRONUNCIATION: (lo-THAR-ee-o)

MEANING: noun: A man who indiscriminately seduces women.

ETYMOLOGY: While the word was popularized after Lothario, a character in the play The Fair Penitent (1703), it first appeared in Don Quixote in which nobleman Anselmo tests his wife’s fidelity by recruiting his friend Lothario to seduce her. Earliest documented use: 1756.
_________________________

NOTHARIO - a would-be Don Juan who's lost his touch

LOTSARIO - what you get at Carnival time

OTHARIO - Horatio got all mixed up
Rasinante- the grapes of wrath (post hoc ergo propter hoc)

P.S. Cool! I read Grapes of Wrath over 25 years ago in high school. I had no idea rocinante had any connection to Steinbeck. I was playing with raisin, grape and latin.

Love the learning. Thanks AWAD.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Long live the flea-bitten nag - 09/11/15 08:04 PM
ROSINANTE

PRONUNCIATION: (roz-uh-NAN-tee)

MEANING: noun: An old, worn-out horse.

ETYMOLOGY: From Rocinante, the name of Don Quixote’s horse. Don Quixote took four days to think of a lofty name for his horse, from Spanish rocín (an old horse: nag or hack) + ante (before, in front of). Earliest documented use: 1641.

___________________________


ROSSINANTE - what Gioachino was called until he wrote the William Tell Overture and became famous
May - that's basically the same principle as yours !

ROSINANTE - what the poker game did when the stakes went up

ROSINANCE - how a violin bow makes such a luscious, rich, beautiful sound
Posted By: May Re: Long live the flea-bitten nag - 09/12/15 05:38 PM
Originally Posted By: wofahulicodoc
ROSINANTE

PRONUNCIATION: (roz-uh-NAN-tee)

MEANING: noun: An old, worn-out horse.

ETYMOLOGY: From Rocinante, the name of Don Quixote’s horse. Don Quixote took four days to think of a lofty name for his horse, from Spanish rocín (an old horse: nag or hack) + ante (before, in front of). Earliest documented use: 1641.

___________________________


ROSSINANTE - what Gioachino was called until he wrote the William Tell Overture and became famous
May - that's basically the same principle as yours !

ROSINANTE - what the poker game did when the stakes went up

ROSINANCE - how a violin bow makes such a luscious, rich, beautiful sound


Ha! Those damn tourne potatoes and Escoffier. Years ago at JW I got in trouble for turning Boccoli Polonaise into broccoli alla May. Ah, to be a Rosinante or a Rossini....
Posted By: May Re: Long live the flea-bitten nag - 09/12/15 08:03 PM
Tournedos- tourne le dos (turn his back)

http://www.npr.org/sections/deceptivecad...s-haute-cuisine

As I learn about Escoffier and Carême and practice the tourne cut, it's nice to learn more of the back story.


https://youtu.be/l9NvaZUqO5g

Hahaha...Cinderella just came on. No surprise Rossini wanted to omit the supernatural element.

Thanks W
Posted By: May Cinderella - 09/13/15 09:09 AM
So ten minutes ago. From hair nation to Broadway, Finian's Rainbow. One if by sea,la nave...information is bogo.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc PP CEF RS MAC - 09/15/15 01:57 AM

DORYPHORE

PRONUNCIATION: (DOR-uh-for)

MEANING: noun: A pedantic or persistent critic.

ETYMOLOGY: From French doryphore (Colorado beetle, a potato pest), from Greek doruphoros (spear carrier). The author Harold Nicolson brought the word to English in its current sense. Earliest documented use: 1952.

_______________________

PORYPHORE - any member of the second phylum of the animal kingdom

DORYPHONE - part of the communication system on a lifeboat
Posted By: wofahulicodoc ...and can't spell, either - 09/15/15 05:58 PM

RATTY

PRONUNCIATION: (RAT-ee)

MEANING: adjective:
1. Of, relating to, or full of rats.
2. Shabby.
3. Irritable; angry.

ETYMOLOGY: From Old English raet (rat). Earliest documented use: 1852.
________________________________

RATHY - angry...

RAFTY - Finnish (like Huck)

IRATTY - a teletype device used by the hearing impaired to discuss their Individual Retirement Account
Posted By: wofahulicodoc PULLULATTE - coffee-on-a-wagon - 09/17/15 01:03 AM

PULLULATE

PRONUNCIATION: (PUHL-yuh-layt)

MEANING: verb intr.:
1. To sprout or breed.
2. To swarm or teem.
3. To increase rapidly.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin pullulare (to sprout), from pullulus, diminutive of pullus (chicken, young animal), from Latin pullus (young animal). Ultimately from the Indo-European root pau- (few, little), which is also the source of few, foal, filly, pony, poor, pauper, poco, puerile, poltroon, punchinello, and catchpole. Earliest documented use: 1602.
____________________________

PULLUWATE - do at least your share

PULLULATER - Sorry, kids, we can't go sledding until this afternoon

PULLUPLATE - remove stuck dentures; can refer tp uppers or lowers, depending on how you pronounce it PULL-U-PLATE or PULL-UP-LATE
Posted By: wofahulicodoc ...little star... - 09/17/15 12:39 PM

WINKLE

PRONUNCIATION: (WING-kuhl)

MEANING:
noun: A periwinkle, any of various mollusks with a spiral shell.
verb tr.: To extract with effort or difficulty.

ETYMOLOGY: For noun: Of uncertain origin.
For verb: From the process of extracting a periwinkle from its shell with a pin for eating its meat.
Earliest documented use: 1585.
____________________________________

INKLE - the first faint glimmer of an idea

WINKE - a Deutche Pac-Man ghost

WINKALE - triumph at the Organic Vegetable fair

Posted By: wofahulicodoc let me rephrase that: - 09/18/15 12:52 AM

WINKALE -
1. triumph at the Organic Vegetable fair
2. blink one eye at that neat new beer
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Shake a leg ! - 09/19/15 02:06 AM

CAPRIOLE

PRONUNCIATION: (KAP-ree-ol)

MEANING: noun:
1. A playful leap: caper.
2. A leap made by a trained horse involving a backward kick of the hind legs at the top of the leap.

ETYMOLOGY: From Middle French capriole (caper) or Italian capriola (leap), from Latin capreolus (goat), diminutive of caper (goat). Earliest documented use: 1580.

___________________________

APRIOLE - what's left when you remove the pit from the fuzzy orange fruit

CAPRIOSE - goatlike

CAPRIOLE - what Cal Ripken covers his head with
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: Shake a leg ! - 09/19/15 07:31 AM
CAPRIODE – What Byron wrote after a boat trip out of Napoli.

KENNING

PRONUNCIATION: (KEN-ing)

MEANING: noun: A figurative, usually compound, expression used to describe something. For example, whale road for an ocean and oar steed for a ship.

ETYMOLOGY: From Old Norse kenna (to know). Ultimately from the Indo-European root gno- (to know), which is also the source of know, recognize, acquaint, ignore, diagnosis, notice, normal, prosopagnosia, gnomon, anagnorisis, and agnosia. Earliest documented use: 1320. Kennings were used especially in Old Norse and Old English poetry.
___________________

iKENNING - Scottish computer knowledge

K-INNING -
1. when the pitcher strikes out the side in baseball
2. a VERY long cricket match

VENNING - circular reasoning

MOT JUSTE

PRONUNCIATION: (mo ZHOOST)

MEANING: noun: The right word.

ETYMOLOGY: From French mot juste (right word). Earliest documented use: 1896. A related term is bon mot.

_______________________

MORT JUSTE - martyrdom

MOT JOUSTE - fighting words

MAT JUSTE - where Right and Wrong duke it out
Posted By: May Re: squeeze the type closer together, why doncha - 09/23/15 03:35 PM

Not Juste- Hella.....Unfair
Dot Juste- Hecka Fair
Lot Juste-HellaFair
Posted By: wofahulicodoc oholophrasm! - a word of surprise - 09/24/15 12:18 AM

HOLOPHRASM

PRONUNCIATION: (HOL-uh-fraz-um)

MEANING: noun
1. A one-word sentence, for example, “Go.”
2. A complex idea conveyed in a single word, for example, “Howdy” for “How do you do?”

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek holos (whole) + phrasis (speech). Earliest documented use: 1862.

__________________________

HOLOPHERASM - orders given by Nebuchadnezzar's Commanding General

HOOPHRASM - excitement about basketball

HOLOPHRASE - a complete sentence
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: oholophrasm! - a word of surprise - 09/24/15 02:14 AM
BOLOPHRASM – I let my machete do the talking.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc POOCHISMO - it's a dog's life! - 09/25/15 01:06 AM

POCHISMO

PRONUNCIATION: (po-CHEEZ-mo)

MEANING: noun
1. An English word borrowed into Spanish, often given a Spanish form or spelling, such as mopear (to mop) instead of trapear or limpiar.
2. American customs, attitudes, etc., adopted by a Hispanic in the US and perceived pejoratively by his compatriots.

ETYMOLOGY: From Spanish pocho (discolored, faded). Earliest documented use: 1944.

NOTES: Pocho is a derogatory term used by a Hispanic for a fellow countryman living in the US who is perceived to have lost his culture and adopted American attitudes, and speaks Spanglish (Spanish heavily influenced by English).

____________________________

PACHISMO - thickness

POCKISMO - toughness, proved by surviving Variola

OCHISMO - the Eightfold Way
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: POOCHISMO - it's a dog's life! - 09/25/15 10:33 AM
PORCHISMO – Being fearless until just before reaching the front sidewalk.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc ANTONOMANIA - Cleopatra's Disease - 09/25/15 11:03 AM
ANTONOMASIA

PRONUNCIATION: (an-toh-noh-MAY-zhuh)

MEANING: noun
1. The use of an epithet or title for a proper name, for example, the Bard for Shakespeare.
2. The use of the name of a person known for a particular quality to describe others, such as calling someone brainy as Einstein. Also known as eponym.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin, from Greek antonomazein (to name differently), from anti- (instead of) + onoma (name). Earliest documented use: 1589.
____________________________


AUTONOMASIA - speaking without thinking

ANTONOMARIA - West Side Story in a nutshell

GANTONOMASIA - uneasiness about a Cuban port (and prison)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc DUNT - past tense of DOIT - 09/29/15 12:51 AM

DINT

PRONUNCIATION: (dint)

MEANING: noun: 1. Force, power. 2. A dent.
verb tr.: To make a dent or to drive in with force.

ETYMOLOGY: From Old English dynt (blow). Earliest documented use: 897.
____________________________

DONT - refrain from force or power

DINUT - a two-holed pastry enjoyed with coffee

DIPT - what you did with your DINUT
Posted By: wofahulicodoc MOIL - singer Haggard in Brooklyn - 09/29/15 12:48 PM

MOIL

PRONUNCIATION: (moyl)

MEANING:
verb intr.: 1. To work hard; to toil. 2. To churn.
verb tr.: To make wet or muddy.
noun: 1. Hard work. 2. Confusion or turmoil.

ETYMOLOGY: From Old French moillier (to moisten), from Latin mollis (soft). Ultimately from the Indo-European root mel- (soft), which also gave us malt, melt, mollify, smelt, enamel, and schmaltz. Earliest documented use: 1611.

_______________________________


HMOIL - electronic messaging in the mountainous regions of China, Vietnam, Laos, and Thailand

MONIL - my Parisian boy friend

MNIL - I remember nothing
Posted By: May Re: [b]MOIL[/b] - singer Haggard in Brooklyn - 09/29/15 01:29 PM
Mail- letters and packages conveyed by the postal system

Toil- to work extremely hard or incessantly
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Lay on, Mac - 09/30/15 10:18 PM

GUFF

PRONUNCIATION: (guf)

MEANING: noun:
1. Nonsense.
2. Insolent talk.

ETYMOLOGY: Perhaps imitative. Earliest documented use: 1825.
_____________________________

GUEFF - Thomaf Jefferfon takef a wild ftab at the anfwer

QUFF - "Have a drink? No way!" (Or, if you insist, "No A!"}

GUFOF - someone who wastes time when he should be working
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Lay on, Mac - 10/02/15 02:24 AM

WEFT

PRONUNCIATION: (weft)

MEANING: noun: The threads that run across the width of a woven fabric and are interlaced through the warp (threads that run lengthwise).

ETYMOLOGY: From Old English wefta (weft). Ultimately from the Indo-European root webh- (to weave; to move quickly), which also gave us weave, webster, waffle, wave, waver, and wobble. Earliest documented use: 725.
_________________________

WEET - what bred is made from

WET - what it used to be made from

WEPT - what they did to the crumbs on the floor after the bred was all et
Posted By: May Re: Lay on, Mac - 10/02/15 03:48 PM
guaff- typeset trickery in Plato's cave (no soup for you)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Lay on, Mac - 10/02/15 06:10 PM

QUAFF

PRONUNCIATION: (kwof)

MEANING:
verb tr., intr.: To drink deeply.
noun: An alcoholic drink; also the act of drinking.

ETYMOLOGY: Of unknown origin, probably imitative. Earliest documented use: 1521
______________________________

QUARF - a pier that can't make up its mind whether it's French (quai) or English (wharf)

QUAFFL - a libation served in a hollowed-out quiddich ball, enjoyed after a major victory
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Lay on, Mac - 10/02/15 08:29 PM
QUARF - a pier that can't make up its mind whether it's French (quai) or English (wharf)

laugh
Posted By: wofahulicodoc ARRRR... - 10/05/15 10:26 PM

GANNET

PRONUNCIATION: (GAN-it)

MEANING: noun:
1. A large seabird known for catching fish by diving from a height.
2. A greedy person.

ETYMOLOGY: From Old English ganot. Ultimately from the Indo-European root ghans- (goose), which also gave us goose, gosling, gander, and gunsel. Earliest documented use: before 1000. Gannets’ reputation for being greedy isn’t deserved though.

________________________


GARNET - a bird that swears mildly when it misses the fish it's diving for

GRANNET - a hard stone composed of little grains

RANNET - 1. sent up the flagpole (but no one saluted); 2. a small frog
Posted By: May Re: ARRRR... - 10/06/15 03:18 AM
bannet- bee bonnet

Posted By: wofahulicodoc buzzword - 10/06/15 09:13 PM

Well, that's certainly not the Bees Knees...
Posted By: wofahulicodoc SNIPE - a Cockney Potions Master - 10/06/15 09:23 PM

SNIPE

PRONUNCIATION: (snyp)

MEANING:
noun:
1. Any of various long-billed birds inhabiting marshy areas.
2. A shot from a concealed position.

verb intr.:
1. To shoot from a concealed position.
2. To criticize in a harsh and unfair way, especially anonymously.

ETYMOLOGY: Probably of Scandinavian origin. The shooting sense comes from the practice of snipe hunting. Earliest documented use: 1325.
_____________________________

SNILE - 1. the longest river in SAfrica
2. an ambivalent facial gesture, combining a sneer and a smile

STIPE - infinite reimbursement (payment without end)

SRIPE - the fruit is ready to eat
Posted By: May Re: buzzword - 10/07/15 05:41 AM
Originally Posted By: wofahulicodoc

Well, that's certainly not the Bees Knees...


...lol

I thought it was funny when I went back to the link (after I posted the image). Arrr! I'm not sure what this bannet says; maybe, "I'm busy."

kiss me quick

get a room
Posted By: wofahulicodoc NODO - stop the shape-shifter! - 10/07/15 01:18 PM

DODO

PRONUNCIATION: (DO-do)

MEANING: noun:
1. An extinct, flightless bird from Mauritius, related to the pigeon but of the size of a turkey.
2. Someone or something that is old-fashioned, ineffective, or outdated.
3. A stupid person.

ETYMOLOGY: From Portuguese doudo/doido (silly, fool). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ors- (buttocks) which also gave us ass, cynosure, and squirrel. Earliest documented use: 1628

____________________________

DONO - what a physician should avoid before all other things (before "harm")

CODO - 1. work together; see also DIDO
2. last word in an arbitrary line in an arbitrary fisherman's sea chanty

DONDO - singular of DONDI, an extinct, flightless orphan from a 60-year-old comic strip
Posted By: May Winter is - 10/07/15 03:30 PM
Hodo-

Lodo-

Oodo-
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Beastmasters pet ferrets - 10/07/15 04:35 PM
PODO AND TODO
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Winter is - 10/07/15 04:36 PM
Originally Posted By: May
Hodo-

Lodo-

Oodo-



Daffy definitions?
Posted By: wofahulicodoc without form, and void - 10/07/15 06:45 PM

I'll take a shot at them:

HODO - G-d's bounty (from the Hebrew)

LODO - the yeast hasn't worked yet; give it more time to rise

ÖODO - what you make egg-bread from

(And speaking of Hebrew, be sure not to mix up PODO AND KODO with TOHU AND BOHU...)
Posted By: May Re: Winter is - 10/07/15 11:48 PM
Originally Posted By: LukeJavan8
Originally Posted By: May
Hodo-

Lodo-

Oodo-



Daffy definitions?


Hodo. Keeping things "simple." It rarely is.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc the Ns have it - 10/08/15 12:53 PM

MAGPIE

PRONUNCIATION: (MAG-py)

MEANING: noun:
1. Any of various birds, typically having a long tail and black-and-white plumage; also various other birds that resemble a magpie.
2. A chatterer.
3. A person who indiscriminately collect things, especially things of little value.

ETYMOLOGY: From Mag (a nickname for Margaret) + pie (magpie), from Latin pica (magpie). The use of the name Mag is from the stereotypical association of women with chattering. Magpies have a (rather undeserved) reputation for chattering and hoarding, but they are some of the most intelligent animals. Two other words coined after them are pied and pica. Earliest documented use: 1589.
________________________________

NAGPIE - an inveterate collector of things of little value who won't stop chattering about it

MANGPIE - a baked dessert made from a sweet aromatic tropical fruit

MAGPINE - a conifer that attracts iron

MAGNIE - any object that looks larger that it really is
Posted By: May 4-n-20 naughty boys - 10/08/15 02:39 PM
Tagpie- pie sent out at Christmas, often regifted

Lagpie- thy breath is like the Steeme of apples; busted

Agpie- pie used to transport vampire trappings; other ingredients include a deadly dose of garlic (Death at first bite)
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: 4-n-20 naughty boys - 10/08/15 04:43 PM
Agpie- pie used to transport vampire trappings; other ingredients include a deadly dose of garlic (Death at first bite)


laugh
Posted By: wofahulicodoc DOTTEREL - my little girl - 10/09/15 12:54 PM

DOTTEREL

PRONUNCIATION: (DOT-uhr-uhl)

MEANING: noun:
1. Any of various plovers breeding in mountainous areas.
2. Someone who is easily duped.

ETYMOLOGY: From dote (to be weak-minded from old age), from Middle English doten (to be foolish) + -rel (diminutive or pejorative suffix), as in doggerel and wastrel. The metaphorical sense of the word derives from the apparently unsuspecting nature of the bird. Earliest documented use: 1440.
__________________________________

DONTEREL - Stop, Mr Flynn!

DOTTEREI - Pointillism, in Germany

GOTTEREL - how the German language sounds
Posted By: May Re: DOTTEREL - my little girl - 10/09/15 03:27 PM
DOTterel- department of transportation flagged

Lotterel- salt of the earth

AMBIT

PRONUNCIATION: (AM-bit)

MEANING: noun: Scope, range, limit, or boundary.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin ambitus (going around), from ambire (to go around), from ambi- (both, around) + ire (to go). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ei- (to go), which also gave us exit, transit, circuit, itinerary, obituary, adit, and arrant. Earliest documented use: 1398.
___________________________________

AMBILT - completed in not just a day, but in a single morning. Unlike Rome.

AMFIT - a proclamation of one's excellent physical condition

AMOBIT - like he used to love, sorta, like, in Old Rome

Posted By: May Rakhi Road - 10/13/15 04:24 AM
Tambit- real sweet
Posted By: May Fictionary - 10/13/15 12:59 PM
Feculate- bad breath feculate

PECULATE

PRONUNCIATION: (PEK-yuh-layt)

MEANING: verb tr., intr.: To steal or misuse money or property entrusted to one’s care.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin pecu (cattle, money). Ultimately from the Indo-European root peku- (wealth), which also gave us fee, fief, fellow, peculiar, impecunious, and pecuniary. Earliest documented use: 1715.

_______________________________

PERCULATE - mispronunciation of an old-style coffee pot

OPECULATE - the oil cartel missed a bond payment

PECULANTE - petty theft at the poker table
RESUMPTIVE

PRONUNCIATION: (ri-ZUHMP-tiv)

MEANING: adjective: Tending to resume, repeat, or summarize.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin resumere (to resume), from re- (again) + sumere (to take). Earliest documented use: 1398.

____________________________________


RESUMPTIRE - the doughnut spare in your trunk

RESUMATIVE - 1. permitting you to continue on (see RESUMPTIRE above);
2. You made a mistake, add 'em up again

ARESUMPTIVE - afflicted with Martian tuberculosis


Posted By: May We came to pump you up - 10/14/15 04:04 PM
[video:youtube]https://youtu.be/I5Zk2vUmjpk[/video]

Repumptive- adding air to your Jacko lantern, similar to a facelift.

Posted By: May Re: We came to pump you up - 10/14/15 04:16 PM
Relumptive- adding lumps to duchess potatoes

Resumptine- King Triton's trident used to part the ocean
Posted By: May Ides- always an angle - 10/15/15 01:43 PM
Uberous (YOO-buhr-uhs)-

Cuberous- Charlie Brown



P.F. post find "It's hip to be square."

UBEROUS

PRONUNCIATION: (YOO-buhr-uhs)

MEANING: adjective: Abundant; fruitful.

ETYMOLOGY: from Latin uber (rich, fruitful, abundant, etc.). Earliest documented use: 1624.
_______________________________

BUBEROUS - plagued

UMBEROUS - shadowy

UBERONUS - the cross we all bear

OLIO

PRONUNCIATION: (OH-lee-oh)

MEANING: noun: A miscellaneous collection of things, for example, a variety show.

ETYMOLOGY: From Spanish olla (pot, stew), from Latin olla (pot). Earliest documented use: 1642. Also see olla podrida.

_______________________________

OLLO -- a male earthenware jar

OFIO -- pertaining to one of Jupiter's larger satellites (out of 67 known so far!)

OIIO -- betcha didn't know 6 in binary is a palindrome!
Posted By: May Wink, wink - 10/16/15 02:46 PM
Oliyo- "O-Ee-Yah! Eoh-Ah!. The chant acts as a sort of audio inkblot."
Posted By: wofahulicodoc well, I'll be a Dutch uncle ! - 10/20/15 02:13 AM

HOGEN-MOGEN

PRONUNCIATION: (HOH-guhn-moh-guhn)

MEANING:
noun: A person having or affecting high power.
adjective: Powerful; grand.

ETYMOLOGY: From Dutch hoogmogend (all powerful), from Hooge en Mogende (high and mighty), honorific for addressing States General (legislature) of the Netherlands. Earliest documented use: 1639.

_________________________________

HOGEN-MOGEN - a sweet-wine-flavored ice cream, the antithesis of the complementary DOS-DAVID flavor

HOGEN-MOVEN - the pigs are going into a different sty for the winter

HOGER-MOGER - underhanded clandestine activity in the Hague (worth reading if you've never come across Elliot Paul before)
Posted By: May Re: well, I'll be a Dutch uncle ! - 10/20/15 01:50 PM
Toenapering- the precious toe ring, one to rule them all

Toenapering- a ring of Toenapers running amok
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: well, I'll be a Dutch uncle ! - 10/20/15 08:16 PM

TOENADERING

PRONUNCIATION: (TOO-nah-duhr-ing)

MEANING: noun: Establishing or reestablishing of cordial relations, especially between nations.

ETYMOLOGY: From Dutch toenadering (advance, approach), from toe (to) + nader (closer). Earliest documented use: 1920.

NOTES: The term is typically seen in South Africa, but it’s worth adopting everywhere. The French equivalent is rapprochement.
_______________________________

(Oh? And the English equivalent is "entente" ?)

_______________________________


TEENADERING - campaigning to improve safety on the golf course

TOENAGERING - a gang of adolescents with foot fetishes

TOKENADERING - a diplomatic ploy, in which a minority caucus agitates to pledge support to its allies, and then gives them a mere pittance

POPPYCOCK

PRONUNCIATION: (POP-ee-kok)

MEANING: noun: Nonsense.

ETYMOLOGY: From Dutch dialect pappekak (soft dung) or poppekak (doll’s excrement). Ultimately from the Indo-European root kakka-/kaka- (to defecate) which also gave us cacophony, cacography, and cucking stool. Earliest documented use: 1852.

_____________________________


POPPYCOOK - Orville Riedenbacher's mascot

POPPYCORK - be careful as you open the champagne bottle !

PROPPYCOCK - a pub for theater folk
Posted By: May Och - 10/21/15 02:10 PM
Poppylock- a useless lock with little to no value

Poppymock- beau- ootiful soo- oop

SOOTERKIN

PRONUNCIATION: (SOO-tuhr-kin)

MEANING: noun:
1. A sweetheart or mistress.
2. An afterbirth formerly believed to be gotten by Dutch women by warming themselves on stoves.
3. Something imperfect or unsuccessful.

ETYMOLOGY: Apparently from Dutch zoet (sweet). Earliest documented use: 1530.

__________________________________

SHOOTERKIN - Annie Oakley was my sister

SOOGERKIN - Sweet Pickles

SOOTHERKIN - Grandma makes everything all better
Posted By: May You can take the girl out of the country..... - 10/22/15 03:17 PM
Smooterkin- sweet home Alabama kin

w00terkin- the 1337 property room
Posted By: May Re: Och - 10/22/15 11:45 PM
Originally Posted By: May
Poppylock- a useless lock with little to no value

Poppymock- beau- ootiful soo- oop


Och = Dutch for Alas
Poppycock inspired Alice in Wonderland. I pass the following images daily at school. I take credit for none. Oh, I guess, we just finished soups, too.





Can anyone figure out the reflected quote?

Oliver Wendell Holmes...
Posted By: May Park the car at... - 10/23/15 02:45 PM
Brattle- My way or the highway
Posted By: wofahulicodoc The ayes have it - 10/23/15 04:59 PM

BRABBLE

PRONUNCIATION: (BRAB-uhl)

MEANING: verb intr.: To argue over petty matters.

ETYMOLOGY: From Middle Dutch brabbelen (to quarrel or jabber). Earliest documented use: 1500.
__________________________

BRIBBLE - a cloth tied loosely around Baby's neck to catch the drooling: a combination of "bib" and "dribble"

BRABIBLE - the Maidenform Handbook

BI-RABBLE - an undisciplined two-part group (like the US Congress)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc feeling no pain - 10/27/15 01:25 AM

ANODYNE

PRONUNCIATION: (AN-uh-dyn)

MEANING:
adjective:
1. Relieving pain; soothing.
2. Bland or insipid: not likely to provoke or offend.
noun:
1. Something that soothes or comforts.
2. A medicine that relieves pain.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin anodynos, from Greek anodynos, from a- (not) + odyne (pain). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ed- (to eat, to bite), which also gave us edible, comestible, obese, etch, fret, postprandial, esurient, and edacity. Earliest documented use: 1543.
_______________________________

ANUDYNE - a fragment of the force that keeps this Board going

ANODYE - what gives anodized metal its color

ANOMYNE -
1. (pronounced "ANN-o-mine") - the girl Raggedy Andy sings lovesongs to when he's a bit under the influence and feeling maudlin
2. (pronounced "a-NOM-in-ee") - a candidate for political office
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: feeling no pain - 10/27/15 07:40 PM

SALACIOUS

PRONUNCIATION: (suh-LAY-shuhs)

MEANING: adjective: 1. Obscene. 2. Lustful.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin salax (lustful, fond of leaping), from salire (to leap). Ultimately from the Indo-European root sel- (to jump), which also gave us salient, sally, sauté, assail, assault, exult, insult, result, somersault, resile, desultory, and saltant. Earliest documented use: 1661.
___________________________________

SALACIONUS - the burden of being lecherous

SALARIOUS - a laughable stipend

FALACIOUS - singing euphemistic choruses
Posted By: May Re: feeling no pain - 10/28/15 09:35 AM
Procity- for living in the city
Prodity- for doing it yourself, in regards to moving
Propity- for stone fruit
Propity- for the love of Mr. T, A Team
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: feeling no pain - 10/28/15 12:31 PM

PROBITY

PRONUNCIATION: (PRO-bi-tee)

MEANING: noun: Integrity and honesty.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin probus (upright, good). Ultimately from the Indo-European root per- (forward), which also gave us paramount, prime, proton, prow, German Frau (woman), and Hindi purana (old). Earliest documented use: 1425.

___________________________


PROBRITY - in favor of England

PROBITH - what one doth (or should) before one jumpith to conclusions

PYROBITY - burning small particles

RECTITUDE

PRONUNCIATION: (REK-ti-tood, -tyood)

MEANING: noun:
1. Moral uprightness.
2. Correctness.
3. Straightness.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin rectus (right, straight). Ultimately from the Indo-European root reg- (to move in a straight line, to lead or rule) that also gave us regime, direct, rectangle, erect, alert, source, surge, recto, abrogate, arrogate, incorrigible, interregnum, prorogue, regent, regnant, and supererogatory. Earliest documented use: 1425.
________________________________

REACTITUDE - a hair-trigger temper

RESTITUDE - just the opposite: slow to respond, verging on torpor

RECTITUNE - what the amateur band did to my song

Posted By: May Varicella - 10/29/15 03:08 PM
Rectimude- mood wrecker

(Profity, cent that is. Peace out word homies)

EMOLLIENT

PRONUNCIATION: (i-MOL-yuhnt)

MEANING:
adjective: Soothing or softening.
noun: Something that sooths or softens.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin emollire (to soften), from ex- (intensive prefix) + mollire (to soften), from mollis (soft). Ultimately from the same Indo-European root mel- (soft) as words such as malt, melt, mollify, smelt, enamel, schmaltz, and moil. Earliest documented use: 1643

____________________________

EXOLLIENT - Kukla and Fran have to go on on their own

EMBOLLIENT - broken off a larger object and carried to a different location

EFOLLIENT - recently discharged as an exotic dancer

STERNUTATE

PRONUNCIATION: (stuhr-NOO-tayt, -NYOO-)

MEANING: verb intr.: To sneeze.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin sternuere (to sneeze). Earliest documented use: 1745.
______________________________________

SATERNUTATE - the sixth planet is wobbling on its axis

STERNULATE - what you hear from your parents when you're not home in time

STERNNUTATE - shake your rear end

ERUCT

PRONUNCIATION: (i-RUKT)

MEANING: verb tr., intr.:
1. To belch: to expel gases from the stomach through the mouth.
2. To emit violently, fumes from a volcano, for example.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin eructare (to vomit, belch, discharge). Ultimately from the Indo-European root reug- (to vomit, to belch, smoke, cloud), which also gave us reek and German rauchen (to smoke). Earliest documented use: 1666.
__________________________________


KERUCT - Yer right!

RERUCT - belch again

ERUNT - (v) they were to have been; (n) even more runty than a D-runt
Posted By: wofahulicodoc the shape of things to come...? - 11/03/15 04:51 PM

I'm just waiting with dread for "singultus" = hiccup. And if he gives "bourbourygmi" (British spelling) we're up the creek altogether...
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Who you callin' a gasbag? - 11/04/15 10:37 PM

FLATULATE

PRONUNCIATION: (FLACH-uh-layt)

MEANING: verb intr.: To pass intestinal gas from the anus.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin flare (to blow). Earliest documented use: 1805.
_____________________________________

FLATULANE - the shoulder of a road, where you put your care when he tire loses its air

FLATULAE - small apartments shared by women (think of a FLAT: a small one is a FLATULE, women make it a FLATULA, and the plural makes them FLATULAE)

FLATULUTE - a stringed musical instrument that can't play any sharps
Posted By: May Ristretto - 11/05/15 07:13 AM
Flatulatte- time sensitive alternative energy
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Ristretto - 11/05/15 12:19 PM
Indeed.
Posted By: May My mother and your mother.... - 11/05/15 07:10 PM
Ingrugitate- "you poked my heart," something the female species is good at, causing confusion.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/video/news/video-1122832/You-poked-heart-Arguing-kids-cutest-thing.html
Posted By: wofahulicodoc INGURGITASTE - gourmandize - 11/05/15 09:54 PM

INGURGITATE

PRONUNCIATION: (in-GUHR-ji-tayt)

MEANING: verb tr.: To swallow greedily or in large amounts.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin gurgitare (to flood), from gurges (whirlpool). Earliest documented use: 1570
_________________________________

INSURGITATE - foment rebellion

INJURGITATE -
1. fill with hand lotion;
2. harm the London art gallery

INGURGITALE - the story of the Coney Island Hot-Dog-Eating Contest
Posted By: wofahulicodoc double mutation - 11/06/15 02:17 PM

NICTITATE

PRONUNCIATION: (NIK-ti-tayt)

MEANING: verb intr.: To wink or blink.

ETYMOLOGY: from Latin nictitare, frequentative of nictare (to wink). Earliest documented use: 1822.

____________________________

NICOTITASTE - why people chew tobacco

NICKITATE - to try to look like Santa Claus

NOCTITATE - close your eyes from drowsiness (see also NICTILATE)

Posted By: May Charybdis - 11/06/15 02:21 PM
Niceitate- to ingurgitate with accuracy and precision
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: double mutation - 11/10/15 03:06 AM

AFFECTIOUS

PRONUNCIATION: (uh-FEK-shuhs)

MEANING: adjective: Affectionate or cordial.

ETYMOLOGY: Via French, from Latin afficere (to affect or influence). Earliest documented use: 1580.

________________________

AFFECTUOUS - laden with projected emotional meaning

OAFFECTIOUS - replete with contagious stupidity

AFFICTIOUS - made up out of whole cloth
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Humph - 11/11/15 02:57 AM

CAMELIOUS

PRONUNCIATION: (kuh-MEE-lee-uhs)

MEANING: adjective: Relating to the camel or its hump.

ETYMOLOGY: From camel, from Latin camelus, from Greek kamelos. Ultimately from the Semitic root gml (camel), which also gave us jamal and gamal, the Arabic and Hebrew words for camel. Earliest documented use: 1902.

___________________________

CAMELLIOUS - flowery

CAMERIOUS - eidetic; exact in every detail

SCAMELIOUS - deceptive

ADVENTIOUS

PRONUNCIATION: (ad-VEN-shuhs)

MEANING: adjective:
1. Coming from outside: not inherent or native.
2. Happening by chance.
3. Appearing in an unusual or abnormal place.

ETYMOLOGY: A variant spelling of adventitious, from Latin adventicius (coming from without), from advenire (to arrive), from ad- (toward) + venire (to come). Earliest documented use: 1633.

_______________________________

AVENTIOUS - without a window

ADVERTIOUS - unfavorable

ADVENTIONS - national meetings of marketing professionals
Posted By: May Travel - 11/11/15 03:04 PM
Odvontooos- Oh, the places you'll go!
Posted By: Tromboniator Sorta like AVENTIOUS - 11/12/15 10:19 PM
BADVENTIOUS - tending to overheat; hard to breathe
Posted By: May Rudra (asymptotic comparison) - 11/13/15 01:55 AM

Rajestious- howling laughter, king's jester full of jokes
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Speaking of the Maharaja, - 11/13/15 03:06 AM

MAJESTIOUS

PRONUNCIATION: (muh-JUHS-shus)

MEANING: adjective: Impressive in a dignified or inspiring manner; stately; grand.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin major (greater), comparative of magnus (large). Ultimately from the Indo-European root meg- (great), which also gave us magnificent, maharajah, mahatma, master, mayor, maestro, magnate, magistrate, maximum, magnify, hermetic, magisterial, magnanimous, magnifico, mahatma, megalopolis, and mickle. Earliest documented use: 1685.

___________________________

MATESTIOUS - studying very hard to pass the examen for entry into the lycée

PAJESTIOUS - the father of all jongleurs

TAJESTIOUS - see here
Posted By: May Kitchari cleanse - 11/13/15 03:19 PM
Quodliberal- education which one deems non-technical, broad ranging
Posted By: wofahulicodoc ad-libetal - 11/13/15 05:31 PM

QUODLIBETAL

PRONUNCIATION: (kwod-LIB-uh-tuhl)

MEANING: adjective: Relating to a question or topic for debate or discussion.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin quodlibetum, from Latin quod (what) + libet (it pleases), meaning “whatever pleases”. Earlier the term referred to a mock exercise in discussion or debate. Earliest documented use: 1581.

____________________________


QUIDLIBETAL - a Member of Parliament who is quite free with spending other peoople's money

QUODLOBETAL - pneumonia that doesn't care which part of your lung it infects

DUODLIBETAL - feed your ulcer anything you like
Posted By: wofahulicodoc or current occupant - 11/16/15 10:26 PM

SITZMARK

PRONUNCIATION: (SITZ-mark, SITS-)

MEANING: noun: A mark made by someone falling backward in the snow.

ETYMOLOGY: From German sitzen (to sit) + mark. Earliest documented use: 1935. Two related words are sitzfleisch and sitzkrieg.

USAGE: “He’d practically worn a sitzmark in the concrete there, so fond was he of that particular fishing hole.”
Marthanne Shubert; A Woman to Blame; Uncial Press; 2009.
_____________________________

HITZMARK - is well and truly aimed

SITZMART - the best place in Berlin to buy chairs

SPITZMARK - how junk mail to a champion Olympic swimmer is addressed

Posted By: May Bananals and appals for sale - 11/16/15 11:51 PM
Xitzmark- x marks the spot, Lore is the name of Data's evil brother....?
Posted By: wofahulicodoc in, out, let's get cracking! - 11/18/15 03:16 AM

OUTRO

PRONUNCIATION: (OU-tro)

MEANING: noun: The concluding part of a piece of music, program, etc.

ETYMOLOGY: Modeled after intro. Earliest documented use: 1967.
________________________

O'UTERO - an Irish womb

OUTRON - a gene that paradoxically is active only when it's deleted

YOUTRO - toss me da dam ball, arreddy!


Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: in, out, let's get cracking! - 11/18/15 02:00 PM

SOLIPSISM

PRONUNCIATION: (SOL-ip-siz-uhm)

MEANING: noun
1. The view or theory that the self is all that exists or can be known to exist.
2. Self-absorption or self-centeredness.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin solus (alone) + ipse (self). Earliest documented use: 1836.
_____________________________________________

SOLIPSIESM - an idea of earth-shaking importance

SOLIPRISM - breaks sunlight into its spectrum of colors

SLIPSISM - a momentary mental lapse
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: in, out, let's get cracking! - 11/18/15 04:41 PM
SLOPSISM -any attempt of mine to cook.
Posted By: May Re: in, out, let's get cracking! - 11/18/15 05:50 PM
Isolipsism- opening the mind's eye (toe-may-toe); similar, in theory, to TBBT and tomatoes cracking. When one becomes too big for their breeches.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc start your own business - 11/20/15 02:38 AM

INTRAPRENEUR

PRONUNCIATION: (in-truh-pruh-NUHR, -NOOR, -NYOOR)

MEANING: noun: An employee who works as an entrepreneur within an established company, having the freedom to take risks and act independently.

ETYMOLOGY: A blend of intra- (within) + entrepreneur, from French entreprendre (to undertake), from Latin inter- (between) + prendere (to take). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ghend-/ghed- (to seize or to take), which also gave us pry, prey, spree, reprise, surprise, osprey, prison, impregnable, impresa, pernancy, and prise. Earliest documented use: 1978.

________________________________________


INTRAPRETEUR - a translator so my multiple personalities can understand each other

INTRAPYRENEUR - a Basque businessman with customers in both France to the North and Spain to the South

ISNTRAPRENEUR - a risk-aversive would-be innovator. See also AINTRAPRENEUR [substandard]
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: start your own business - 11/20/15 06:29 PM

INTRAPRETEUR - a translator so my multiple personalities can understand each other


laugh
Posted By: wofahulicodoc from the sublilme to the ridiculous - 11/20/15 08:26 PM

BATHOS

PRONUNCIATION: (BAY-thas, -thos)

MEANING: noun: An abrupt descent from lofty or sublime to the commonplace; anticlimax.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek bathos (depth). Earliest documented use: 1638.

______________________________

BIATHOS - the Muskeeteer swings both ways

BUTHOS - an enema tube

BATHOUS - 1. a lavatorium
2. Bruce Wayne's mansion in Berlin
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: from the sublilme to the ridiculous - 11/21/15 01:11 AM
BOTHOS – replacement for Mac and Windows
Posted By: wofahulicodoc The As have it! - 11/24/15 02:26 AM

STRIDULOUS

PRONUNCIATION: (STRIJ-uh-luhs)

MEANING: adjective: 1. Having or making a harsh grating sound. 2. Shrill or grating.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin stridere (to make a harsh sound). Earliest documented use: 1611.
_____________________________

STRADULOUS - sounding ike an old violin

ASTRIDULOUS - one leg on one side, one leg on the other

'STRIADULOUS - it sounds like a I-III-V chord

(Compare with the word for June 4, 2015. Something's not really cricket here!
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Egotistical remarks - 11/25/15 01:47 AM

TORPID

PRONUNCIATION: (TOR-pid)

MEANING: adjective:
1. Sluggish or inactive.
2. Apathetic.
3. Dormant, as when hibernating.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin torpidus (numb), from torpere (to be stiff or numb). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ster- (stiff), which also gave us starch, stare, stork, starve, cholesterol, and torpedo. Earliest documented use: 1613.

_________________________________

PORPID - dolphin-like

TORNID - my driver's license is torn up

TOROID - horny, like a bull (What, you were expecting something doughnut-shaped?)

Posted By: wofahulicodoc not so silly after all - 11/25/15 02:25 PM

FASTUOUS

PRONUNCIATION: (FAS-choo-uhs)

MEANING: adjective: 1. Haughty; arrogant. 2. Pretentious.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin fastuosus, from fastus (arrogance). Earliest documented use: 1638.
________________________________

FISTUOUS - given to hitting, with minimal provocation

FASTULOUS - tends to protest by going on a hunger strike

FASTUOUT - our bouncer is very efficient here
Posted By: wofahulicodoc well of all the nerve... - 11/26/15 04:54 PM

IMPERTINENT

PRONUNCIATION: (im-PURT-nuhnt)

MEANING: adjective: 1. Presumptuous or rude. 2. Irrelevant.

ETYMOLOGY: From in- (not) + pertinere (to pertain), from per- (through) + tenere (to hold). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ten- (to stretch), which also gave us tense, tenet, tendon, tent, tenor, tender, pretend, extend, tenure, tetanus, hypotenuse, tenuous, tenable, extenuate, distend, detente, countenance, and abstentious. Earliest documented use: 1380.

_________________________


IMPERATINENT - the Emperor's realm fills this entire land mass

IMBERTINENT - Hi, my name is Bertinent !

IMPEXTINENT - that naughty little critter used to rent an apartment in the building I own
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Drunk again - 11/27/15 04:42 PM

BIBULOUS

PRONUNCIATION: (BIB-yuh-luhs)

MEANING: adjective: 1. Excessively fond of drinking. 2. Highly absorbent.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin bibere (to drink). Ultimately from the Indo-European root poi- (to drink), which also gave us potion, poison, potable, beverage, and Sanskrit paatram (pot). Earliest documented use: 1676.
________________________

BIMBULOUS - airheaded

BIBBULOUS - like lettuce

BIBLOUS - Scriptural
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Drunk again - 12/01/15 02:31 AM

GRAMARYE

PRONUNCIATION: (GRAM-uh-ree)

MEANING: noun: Occult learning; magic.

ETYMOLOGY: From Old French gramaire (grammar, book of magic), from Greek gramma (letter). Ultimately from the Indo-European root gerbh- (to scratch), which also gave us crab, crayfish, carve, crawl, grammar, program, graphite, glamor, anagram, paraph, and graffiti. Earliest documented use: 1320.

___________________________

GRAMAREYE - what it takes to be a good editor and proofreader

GRAMPARYE - the ancestor of all blended whiskey

GAMARYE - a very short, high-energy wave studied by Australian physicists
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Drunk again - 12/01/15 09:42 PM

QUACKSALVER

PRONUNCIATION: (KWAK-sal-vuhr)

MEANING: noun: A quack: one pretending to have skills or knowledge, especially in medicine.

ETYMOLOGY: From obsolete Dutch (now kwakzalver), from quack (boast) + salve (ointment). Earliest documented use: 1579.
____________________________


QUARKSALVER - what to serve your sub-atomic - nay, sub-nuclear - particles on

QUACKSALTER - what you use to make Pickled Duck

QUACKSAVER - what you suck on when you hanker after a toroidal fowl-flavored hard candy
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Drunk again - 12/02/15 11:56 AM

VIRIDITY

PRONUNCIATION: (vi-RID-i-tee)

MEANING: noun: 1. The quality or state of being green. 2. Youthful innocence.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin viridis (green). Earliest documented use: 1430.
___________________________

VIRGIDITY - the maiden has a cold

VIXIDITY - foxiness

VIRIDITE - 1. a native or Viridia; 2. a copper-containing ore; it shows green sparkles in bright light
Posted By: LukeJavan8 - - -not really helping - 12/02/15 05:25 PM
QUICKSALVER BandAid on a Cancer
Posted By: LukeJavan8 - - -colorful perhaps - 12/02/15 05:27 PM
VIVIDITY Brightly seen
Posted By: wofahulicodoc malicious mischief - 12/03/15 06:03 PM

YOBBERY

PRONUNCIATION: (YOB-uh-ree)

MEANING: noun: Rowdy, destructive behavior by the youth.

ETYMOLOGY: From yob (a rowdy youth), coined by reversing the spelling of the word boy. Earliest documented use: 1974.
________________________________

YOBEERY - how to catch the attention of a venerable American comic actor from both silent and sound film eras

BYOBBERY - being invited to a party and then finding out you're expected to bring your own booze

COBBERY - the relationship between BFFs in Australia
Posted By: wofahulicodoc wine not? - 12/04/15 07:48 PM

XENOPHILE

PRONUNCIATION: (ZEN-uh-fyl, ZEE-nuh-)

MEANING: noun: One who is attracted to foreign things or people.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek xeno- (foreign) + -phile (love). Earliest documented use: 1934.

_____________________________

OENOPHILE is a real word, and so is XENOPHILE. Rats.
_____________________________

LENOPHILE - Jimmy's good, and Stephen is better, but they'll never take Jay's place

X-NO-PHILE - it's so secret, even Mulder and Scully can't talk about it...

OXENOPHILE - What are you, some kind of pervert?
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: wine not? - 12/08/15 03:12 AM

JACULATE

PRONUNCIATION: (JAK-yuh-layt)

MEANING: verb tr.: To emit or hurl.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin jaculare (to dart), from jaculum (dart, javelin), from jacere (to throw). Earliest documented use: 1623.
_________________________________

JACULATTE - last season's pumpkin-flavored drink from Starbucks

MACULATE - a mis-conception

JACKULATE - what Jackie said to JFK when he didn't show up on time
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: wine not? - 12/08/15 07:43 AM
JAMULATE - You started your improvised solo a beat or two off.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc no relation to COGNAC ? - 12/08/15 08:34 PM

COGNIZE

PRONUNCIATION: (KOG-nyz)

MEANING: verb tr.: To perceive; to understand; to know.

ETYMOLOGY: Back-formation from cognizance, via French from Latin cognoscere (to learn). Ultimately from the Indo-European root gno- (to know), which is also the source of know, recognize, acquaint, ignore, diagnosis, notice, normal, anagnorisis (the moment of recognition or discovery), and prosopagnosia (inability to recognize faces). Earliest documented use: 1659.
_________________________________________

COIGNIZE - to turn a corner; to place the keystone in an arch; to insert two stepped wedges to fill up space

COGNITE - a word in a foreign language that comes from the same origin as Austrailian word

CYGNIZE - a fancy word meant to hide the fact that you're calling something ugly (like the Ugly Duckling)

PLAINT

PRONUNCIATION: (playnt)

MEANING: noun: 1. Complaint. 2. Protest. 3. Lamentation.

ETYMOLOGY: From from Old French plainte (complaint, cry), from Latin planctus (lamentation), from plangere (to beat one’s breast). Ultimately from the Indo-European root plak- (to strike), which also gave us plaintiff, plague, plankton, fling, complain, apoplectic and plangent. Earliest documented use: 1225.

_______________________________

PLAINST - most undistinguished

SLAINT - What St George hath done to the Dragon

SPLAINT - I told you all about it already!
PLAINCT "Walk the....." in pirate speak.

PLA-INC - an early candidate for the toy-store name, before they settled on Toys-R-Us
Posted By: May I love Lucy - 12/09/15 11:14 PM
Splaint- past tense of Splain. What Lucy does when Ricky starts the finger waggin.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc maybe this will help - 12/10/15 01:50 PM

SUAGE

PRONUNCIATION: (swaz)

MEANING: verb tr.: To assuage: to make something unpleasant less severe.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin suavis (sweet). Ultimately from the Indo-European root swad- (sweet, pleasant), which also gave us sweet, suave, hedonism, persuade, and Hindi swad (taste). Earliest documented use: 1400.
___________________________________

SUARE - utter an oath

SQUAGE - past tense of SQUEEGE, to dry a pane of glass by scraping across it with a flexible rubber straightedge

SUAZE - what tall grass does in the breeze

Posted By: May 'sup - 12/10/15 09:31 PM
supage- the action or process of eating, something, sometime.

Phở
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: maybe this will help - 12/12/15 03:05 AM

GRATULATE

PRONUNCIATION: (GRACH-uh-layt)

MEANING: verb tr.:
1. To congratulate.
2. To express joy at the sight of something or someone.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin gratulari (to congratulate), from con- (with) + gratulari (to show joy), from gratus (pleasing). Earliest documented use: 1567.
___________________________

GYRATULATE - composed of many small particles going around in circles

GRATUIATE - tipsy

GRABULATE - Personal Foul, loss of 15 yards from the point of the infraction, automatic First Down
Posted By: May Re: maybe this will help - 12/12/15 03:58 PM
Granulate- subatomic fairy dust your gran uses during the winter solstice
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: maybe this will help - 12/12/15 04:22 PM
smile

BOUILLABAISSE

PRONUNCIATION: (boo-yuh-BAYS, BOO-yuh-bays, BOOL-yuh-bays, bool-yuh-BAYS)

MEANING: noun: 1. A rich and spicy fish stew or soup. 2. A mixture of incongruous things.

ETYMOLOGY: From French bouillabaisse, from Provençal bouiabaisso, from Latin bullire (to boil) + bassus (low). Earliest documented use: 1855.
____________________________________

BOOILLABAISSE - a special soup served at a Halloween party

BOUILLABAISTE - or use it to moisten your turkey as it roasts

BOULLABAISSE - first or second or third sack at a Yale baseball game

BROUILLABAISSE - the ultimate in before-dinner beers, rich and spicy
Posted By: May klah/foo/tee - 12/15/15 07:59 PM
Behry-Pick- paint your clafoutis
Posted By: wofahulicodoc take only the best and easiest - 12/15/15 08:01 PM

CHERRY-PICK

PRONUNCIATION: (CHER-ee-pik)

MEANING: verb tr.: To pick in a highly selective manner. Example, to cherry-pick data to suit a hypothesis.

ETYMOLOGY: From the idea of picking the best cherries from a tree. Earliest documented use: 1966.
________________________________


CHEERY-PICK - an upbeat banjo or guitar riff (like this one)

CHERRY-PUCK - a bizarre award given to the Boston Bruins coach in 1979 after a particularly egregious hockey maneuver backfired

SHERRY-PICK - "I'll have the Bristol Cream, please"
Posted By: wofahulicodoc warmed-over words - 12/16/15 01:29 PM

RECHAUFFE

PRONUNCIATION: (ray-sho-FAY)

MEANING: noun: 1. Warmed leftover food. 2. Rehash: old reworked material.

ETYMOLOGY: From French réchauffé (reheated, rehashed), from chauffer (to warm), from Latin calefacere (to make warm), from calere (to be hot) + facere (to make). Other (some hot, some not) words derived from the Latin root calere are chafe, nonchalant, calefacient, and chauffeur (literally, a stoker, who warmed up the engine in early steam-driven cars). Earliest documented use: 1778.
_________________________________

PRECHAUFFE - eaten unwarmed, like biftek tartare or cold pizza

RECHUFFE - Angry again?

RICHAUFFE - having a lot of French loud iron
Posted By: May 21B Baker St. - 12/16/15 04:35 PM
Rechauffed- afternoon tea and biscuits
Posted By: wofahulicodoc all sweeetness and light - 12/17/15 02:12 PM

SACCHARINE

PRONUNCIATION: (SAK-uh-rin, -REEN, -ruhn, -ryn)

MEANING: adjective: Excessively sweet, sentimental, or ingratiating.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin saccharum (sugar), from Greek sakkharon, from Sanskrit sarkara (gravel, sugar). Earliest documented use: 1674.

NOTES: The name of the synthetic sweetening compound, saccharin, is derived from the same Latin word as today’s term. The compound was first produced in 1879, but the usage of the word saccharine goes much earlier. For example, Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote in 1841:
“One might find argument for optimism in the abundant flow of this saccharine element of pleasure in every suburb and extremity of the good world.”

_______________________________

BACCHARINE - orgiastic

SACCHORINE - fire the singer!

SACCHARMINE- a bag of soft toilet paper
Posted By: May Malarkey - 12/17/15 06:08 PM
Sacchagrine- seersucker at the zoo in the land of milk and honey
Posted By: Tromboniator Don't trip - 12/18/15 09:57 AM
FARRAGO

PRONUNCIATION:
(fuh-RAH-goh)

MEANING:
noun: A confused mixture.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin farrago (mixed fodder). Ultimately from the Indo-European root bhares- (barley), which also gave us barn, barley, and farina. Earliest documented use: 1637.
____________________________________

FARTAGO – usual response to, "Are we there yet?"
Posted By: wofahulicodoc a distant galaxy farraway - 12/18/15 02:20 PM

FARRAGO

PRONUNCIATION: (fuh-RAH-goh)

MEANING: noun: A confused mixture.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin farrago (mixed fodder). Ultimately from the Indo-European root bhares- (barley), which also gave us barn, barley, and farina. Earliest documented use: 1637.

________________________________

FARRAGNO - an Incredibly Hulking actor from Boston

FARRAGE - horseshoeness

BARRAGO - what I go into when I want a drink
Posted By: May Music to my ears! Do Rei Mi - 12/18/15 05:51 PM
Farraso- a quilting party song...farr a long, long way to sooo a camel pulling thread

Farrado- a hip square dance...farr a long, long way back to dosido

Yehaw! Everybody cut loose, footloose!
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: a distant galaxy farraway - 12/21/15 01:46 PM

QUOZ

PRONUNCIATION: (kwaz)

MEANING: noun: An odd person or thing.

ETYMOLOGY: Of uncertain origin. Perhaps it’s a variant of the word quiz which has a similar meaning. Or maybe the word quiz is a variant of quoz. It’s all very quizzical. Or quozzical. Earliest documented use: 1780.
__________________________________

QUON - a hybrid particle, combining the qualities of a quark and a muon

IQUOZ - the intelligence of the Wizard

SQUOZ - pluperfect subjunctive for what you shouldn't do to the Charmin'
Posted By: LukeJavan8 - - -too many holiday parties - 12/21/15 04:20 PM
QUOF (hic)eggnog
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: - - -too many holiday parties - 12/21/15 08:20 PM
Originally Posted By: LukeJavan8
QUOF (hic)eggnog

...or, QUOF = what the Raven faid, nevermore ?
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Publius Naso - 12/22/15 09:41 PM

VIDIMUS

PRONUNCIATION: (VAI-di-muhs)

MEANING: noun: 1. An attested copy of a document. 2. An official inspection.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin vidimus (we have seen), from videre (to see). Ultimately from the Indo-European root weid- (to see), which also gave us guide, wise, vision, advice, idea, story, history, vizard, videlicet, prudential, previse, and invidious. Earliest documented use: 1436.

_______________________________


OVIDIMUS - We have written a poem in Latin

VIDIPUS - Oedipus before he plucked his eyes out, so he could still see

VIDIMUST - You just have to watch this!
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Publius Naso - 12/23/15 02:17 AM
VIODIMUS inspector of violins, violas, etc.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Publius Naso - 12/23/15 12:03 PM

PINCHBECK

PRONUNCIATION: (PINCH-bek)

MEANING: adjective: Counterfeit or spurious.
noun: An alloy of zinc and copper, used as imitation gold in jewelry.

ETYMOLOGY: After watchmaker Christopher Pinchbeck (1670-1732), who invented it. It’s ironic that today his name is a synonym for something counterfeit, but in his time his fame was worldwide, not only as the inventor of this curious alloy, but also as a maker of musical clocks and orreries. The composition of this gold-like alloy was a closely-guarded secret, but it didn’t prevent others from passing off articles as if made from this alloy... faking fake gold!
_________________________________

PINCHBACK - what you should do to the rhododendrons after they finish blooming (see "deadheading")

PINCHNECK - a Vulcan maneuver to disable one's opponents without causing permanent harm

PUNCHBECK - what a kid does in a Brooklyn schoolyard when someone hits him
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Publius Naso - 12/23/15 03:57 PM
BUNCHBACK What many people need to do with hair that is always falling
in their faces.



I like your kid in Brooklyn
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Publius Naso - 12/24/15 06:47 PM

JAYHAWKER

PRONUNCIATION: (JAY-haw-kuhr)

MEANING: noun: 1. A robber. 2. A native or resident of Kansas.

ETYMOLOGY: Originally, a Jayhawker was a member of antislavery guerrillas in Kansas or Missouri during the US Civil War. It’s not clear why they were called Jayhawkers. Earliest documented use: 1860.

____________________________

JAYHAWKERY - the downfall of Panem and its Hunger Games; selling the Revolution to the outlying provinces

JOYHAWKER -
1. G-d Rest Ye Merry, Merchants, May you make the Yuletide pay (Tom Lehrer)
2. It's the old Dope Peddler, with his powdered happiness (also Tom Lehrer)

JAYHAWSER - (nautical) a rope one grade thicker than an I-hawser

Posted By: wofahulicodoc ABCDEFGHIJK MNOPQRSTUVWXYZ - 12/25/15 01:39 PM

EXPERGEFACIENT

PRONUNCIATION: (eks-puhr-juh-FAY-shuhnt)

MEANING: adjective: Awakening or arousing.
noun: A drug or other agent that awakens or arouses.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin expergefacere (to awaken), from expergisci (to become awake) + facere (to make or do). Earliest documented use: 1821.
__________________________________

EXPURGEFACIENT - laxative

EXPERGEFACIEST - the best pepper-upper in the whole wide world !

EXPERTEFACIENT - it'll teach you everything in just six quick lessons


Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: ABCDEFGHIJKMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ - 12/25/15 04:38 PM
SEXPERGEFACIENT teen age hormones
Posted By: wofahulicodoc first things first - 12/28/15 03:09 PM

PATERNOSTER

PRONUNCIATION: (PAY-tuhr NOS-tuhr, PAH-, PAT-)

MEANING: noun
1. A sequence of words used as a formula, a charm, etc.
2. A continuously moving endless elevator that goes in a loop.
3. The Lord’s Prayer; one of the certain larger beads in a rosary on which the Lord’s Prayer is said.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin pater noster (our father), opening words of the Lord’s Prayer in Latin. Earliest documented use: before 900.

_____________________________

PASTERNOSTER - our local parish priest, who can't spell

PATTERN OSTER - how to assemble your new blender

PATEROOSTER - alpha male in the henhouse
Posted By: wofahulicodoc animal farm - 12/29/15 02:18 PM

MITTIMUS

PRONUNCIATION: (MIT-uh-muhs)

MEANING: noun: An official order to commit someone to prison.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin mittimus (we send), the first word of such an order, from mittere (to send). Earliest documented use: 1443.
_________________________________________

MUTTIMUS - Superdog

MITTIPUS - Supercat

MITTIMAUS - Mighty Mouse
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: animal farm - 12/30/15 04:35 AM
TITTIMUS – A cheery little bird that makes your heart go pittipat.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: animal farm - 12/30/15 01:47 PM
Originally Posted By: Tromboniator
TITTIMUS – A cheery little bird that makes your heart go pittipat.

That's the tufted one, right?
Posted By: wofahulicodoc igitur - 12/30/15 01:50 PM

GAUDEAMUS

PRONUNCIATION: (gau-di-AHM-uhs)

MEANING: noun: A convivial gathering or merry-making of students at a college or university.

ETYMOLOGY: From the students’ song “De Brevitate Vitae” (On the Shortness of Life) whose first word is gaudeamus (let’s rejoice). Earliest documented use: 1823.

_______________________________

GAUZEAMUS - let's wrap him up like a mummy

GAUDEAMOS - celebrate the famous cookie-maker

EAUDEAMUS - the new fragrance from Paris
Posted By: wofahulicodoc ...and a dollar short - 01/01/16 04:02 PM

DEBENTURE

PRONUNCIATION: (di-BEN-chuhr)

MEANING: noun: A certificate acknowledging a debt.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin debentur (they are due/owing), the first word in early certificates of indebtedness. From Latin debere (to owe), ultimately from the Indo-European root ghabh- (to give or to receive), which is also the source of give, gift, able, habit, prohibit, due, duty, adhibit, and habile. Earliest documented use: 1455.
____________________________________

DEBENTIRE - the Compleat Devorah

DEVENTURE - withdraw from a dubious enterprise

DECENTURE - Of course my clothes are on, some on in!
Posted By: wofahulicodoc a Magnificent New Year to all :-) - 01/01/16 04:18 PM

MAGNIFICAT

PRONUNCIATION: (mag-NIF-i-kat)

MEANING: noun:
1. The hymn of the Virgin Mary in Luke, 1:46-55.
2. An utterance of praise.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin magnificat (magnifies), the first word of the Latin version of the hymn that opens with “Magnificat anima mea Dominum” (“My soul magnifies the Lord”), from Latin magnus (great). Ultimately from the Indo-European root meg- (great), which is also the source of magnificent, maharajah, master, mayor, maestro, magnate, magistrate, maximum, magnify, mickle, mahatma, magnanimous, magisterial, magnifico, majestious, and hermetic. Earliest documented use: before 450.
____________________________________

MAGNIFICT - an epic lie

MAGNITICAT - Rub it against a glass rod and it'll stick to the wall

MUGNIFICAT - What a beautiful face !
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: a Magnificent New Year to all :-) - 01/01/16 05:19 PM
MALNIFICAT something wicked this way comes
Posted By: May Sam I am - 01/02/16 06:45 AM
Magnifiscat- a mighty magnifying monocle
Posted By: wofahulicodoc is two of them a paradox? - 01/05/16 03:11 AM

DOX

PRONUNCIATION: (doks)

MEANING: verb tr.: To gather and publish someone’s personal information, such as phone number, address, email messages, credit card numbers, etc., especially with a malicious intent.
noun: Personal information about someone, collected and published without permission.

ETYMOLOGY: Phonetic respelling of docs, short for documents, from Latin documentum (lesson, proof, specimen), from docere (to teach), which also gave us doctor and docent. Earliest documented use: early 2000s.

__________________________________


DROX - black and white cookie, often enjoyed with cold milk, competitor of Reo, but it doesn't really matter 'cause they're both owned by the same company. YCLIU.

DOXU - the latest Star Wars villian

GOX - phonetic respelling of GOKS, acronym of God Only KnowS.
You hope your doctor never has to tell you "You have GOKS Disease;" there's no cure.
Posted By: May Double Jeopardy - 01/05/16 03:24 AM
- not just no, but hella no







Click to reveal..
- NOx
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: Double Jeopardy - 01/05/16 05:20 PM
DOX'S A "Physician, heal thyself" Convention of the AMA.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc just picture this - 01/05/16 06:28 PM

PHOTOSHOP

PRONUNCIATION: (FOT-uh-shop)

MEANING: verb tr.: To digitally alter an image, especially in order to distort reality.

ETYMOLOGY: From Adobe Photoshop, a widely-used software package for editing images. Earliest documented use: 1992.
___________________________________


PROTOSHOP - the dawn of commerce

PHOTOSHOE - erotica for a foot-fetishist

PHOTOSTOP - a Papparazzi-repellent for the rich and famous
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: just picture this - 01/05/16 10:25 PM
PHOTOSHIP - a vessel that travels at c.

PHYTOSHOP - software that does everything from flower arrangement to enhanced-yield crops.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: just picture this - 01/06/16 06:56 PM

DEFRIEND

PRONUNCIATION: (di-FREND)

MEANING: verb tr.: To remove someone from one’s list of online friends.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin de- (from, away) + friend, from Old English freond. Ultimately from the Indo-European root pri- (to love), which also gave us free, Friday, and Sanskrit priya (beloved). Earliest documented use: 2004.

NOTES: The first use of the word ‘defriend’ in the Oxford English Dictionary is from 2004. In contrast, the first use of the word ‘befriend’ goes all the way to 1559. It took us another 100 years to ‘unfriend’ someone -- 1659. The verb ‘to friend’ goes way back to 1225. Finally, the noun ‘friend’ is attested in Old English (c. 450-1150).]
______________________________


DEFIEND - exorcise

DOEFRIEND - Bambi's momma

DERRIEND - horse's a** can't make up his mind whether he's French or English
Posted By: wofahulicodoc adulterated pictures of cleverness - 01/06/16 10:08 PM
Originally Posted By: Tromboniator
PHOTOSHIP - a vessel that travels at c.

PHYTOSHOP - software that does everything from flower arrangement to enhanced-yield crops.

...where's that "LIKE" button?

AFFLUENZA

PRONUNCIATION: (af-loo-EN-zuh)

MEANING: noun: A feeling of malaise accompanied by lack of motivation, dissatisfaction, feelings of guilt, especially among wealthy young people.

ETYMOLOGY: A blend of affluence + influenza. Both words are from Latin fluere (to flow). Ultimately from the Indo-European root bhleu- (to swell or overflow), from which flow words such as influence, fluctuate, fluent, fluid, fluoride, flush, flux, reflux, superfluous, fluvial, and profluent. Earliest documented use: 1973.

USAGE: “When Ethan Couch was 16, he was spared prison after killing four people in a drink-driving accident because a judge found that he suffered from affluenza ...
“Couch’s blood-alcohol level was three times the legal limit and there were traces of Valium and marijuana in his system when he took seven friends for a high-speed ride in his pick-up truck on June 15, 2013. He ploughed into a broken-down car at over 70 mph, killing four people who were working on it. Two of his friends were critically injured and one was left paralysed. ...
“Couch’s defence hinged on a psychologist’s evidence that the boy could not understand the consequences of his actions because he had been raised by ‘profoundly dysfunctional’ millionaire parents who encouraged his bad behaviour. ‘Instead of the golden rule, which was -- Do unto others as you would have them do unto you -- he was taught ‘We have the gold, we make the rules,’ Dick Miller [a psychologist hired by the defense] testified.”
Ben Hoyle; Boy Who was Too Rich for Jail Goes on the Run; The Times (London, UK); Dec 18, 2015.

_____________________________________

ARFLUENZA - my dog is sick, I can tell just from hearing him bark

WAFFLUENZA - a pathological inability to make up one's mind

AFFLUENNA - the chaperone is very well-heeled...
BAFFLUENZA- -totally clueless all the time.
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: adulterated pictures of cleverness - 01/07/16 11:39 PM
Thank you, wofa.
AFFLUENDA - terminus of a chimney, eh?

PEEPS

PRONUNCIATION: (peeps)

MEANING: noun: People, especially when referring to one’s friends or associates.

ETYMOLOGY: Shortened form of people. Earliest documented use: 1847.

________________________________

PEPS - Shortened form of a popular soda

OPEEPS - Whose sheep did you say these are?

PEEPHS - measures of urinary acidity
Posted By: wofahulicodoc today's task is heterological - 01/11/16 03:56 PM

ONEROUS

PRONUNCIATION: (ON-uh-ruhs, OH-nuhr-)

MEANING: adjective:
1. Oppressively burdensome.
2. Having obligations or responsibilities that outweigh the benefits.

ETYMOLOGY: From Old French onereus, from Latin onerosus, from onus (burden). Earliest documented use: 1395.

______________________________________________

GONEROUS - 1. like Lear's eldest daughter; 2. like a venereal disease (OK, if you insist, an STD)

ONE-R OPUS - a specific lipogram, wherein every word has one and exactly one R

ÂNEROUS - like an ass (how's your French?); not unlike "asinine"

Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: today's task is heterological - 01/11/16 04:42 PM
ODEROUS-badly in need of a tic-tac
Posted By: May Re: today's task is heterological - 01/12/16 01:17 AM
Onedrous- David Bowie, "a divinely inspired and purposefully lived life"




Rolling Stone's contemporary review of Hunky Dory considered that "Changes" could be "construed as a young man's attempt to reckon how he'll react when it's his time to be on the maligned side of the generation schism".[8] -Wikipedia
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: today's task is heterological - 01/13/16 03:38 AM

TORPOR

PRONUNCIATION: (TOR-puhr)

MEANING: noun: A state marked by apathy, lethargy, and inactivity.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin torpere (to be stiff or numb). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ster- (stiff), which also gave us starch, stare, stork, starve, cholesterol, torpedo, and torpid. Earliest documented use: 1607.
___________________________________

TORMOR - rent into smaller pieces

TORPORK - spareribs, eaten without benefit of cutlery

TORROR - mortal fear of getting a run in one's stockings
TORTOR -raw steak
Originally Posted By: LukeJavan8
TORTOR -raw steak

"row steak," maybe? or even more precisely, "row steok"?
Posted By: wofahulicodoc bees in my bonnet today - 01/13/16 02:05 PM

WELTER

PRONUNCIATION: (WEL-tuhr)

MEANING: noun: 1. A confused mass; a jumble. 2. A state of upheaval.
verb intr.: 1. To roll, writhe, or toss. 2. To lie soaked in something, such as blood.

ETYMOLOGY: From Middle Dutch welteren or Middle Low German weltern (to roll). Ultimately from the Indo-European root wel- (to turn or roll), which also gave us waltz, revolve, valley, walk, vault, volume, wallet, helix, devolve, and voluble. Earliest documented use: 1400.

____________________________________

BELTER - 1. an inhabitant of Ceres (or any other asteroid)
2. Ethel Merman

BWELTER - someone trying to portray a loud, evil laugh (BWA-ha-ha-ha...)

WEBTER - the best dictionary to use if you have a speech impediment
Posted By: May Re: bees in my bonnet today - 01/13/16 10:35 PM
How wood!

Welper- someone who says welp a lot. "Welp, what are you going to do."

-\_(°_°)_/-
Posted By: wofahulicodoc time marches on - 01/14/16 01:31 PM

Originally Posted By: May

-\_(°_°)_/-



ASCII art - a vanishing practice, more's the pity
Posted By: wofahulicodoc making an S of myself again - 01/14/16 01:39 PM

INVECTIVE

PRONUNCIATION: (in-VEK-tiv)

MEANING: noun: An insulting or abusive criticism or expression.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin invehi (to attack with words), from invehere (to carry in). Ultimately from the Indo-European root wegh- (to go or to transport in a vehicle), which also gave us deviate, way, weight, wagon, vogue, vehicle, vector, envoy, trivial, and inveigh. Earliest documented use: 1430.

_________________________________

INVESTIVE - 1. pertaining to the ascension to a new position of power, reponsibility, and respect
2. placing assets where they will grow

INSECTIVE - encouraging the spread of arthropods

SINVECTIVE - dramatic exhortation against evil and transgression

Posted By: wofahulicodoc blow your own trumpet - not - 01/15/16 02:37 PM

RETICENCE

PRONUNCIATION: (RE-tuh-sens)

MEANING: - noun: A reluctance to express one’s thoughts and feelings.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin reticere (to be silent), from re- (again, back), from tacere (to be silent). Earliest documented use: 1603.
_____________________________

RELICENCE - obtain a new permit

RETICENSE - make a new macrame holder for the aroma-spreader in church

ARETICENCE - awareness of the purity and the virtue and the goodness of the ideal world


Posted By: May Re: time marches on - 01/15/16 04:57 PM
Originally Posted By: wofahulicodoc

Originally Posted By: May

-\_(°_°)_/-



ASCII art - a vanishing practice, more's the pity


smile
Posted By: May Re: time marches on - 01/15/16 05:11 PM
Rétifence- An opening in a fence

Far from the madding crowd's ignoble strife
Their sober wishes never learn'd to stray;
Along the cool sequester'd vale of life
They kept the noiseless tenor of their way.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Reti fence - 01/16/16 05:43 PM

Reti? Wasn't he a chess player? Who would want to peddle stuff they stole from him?
Posted By: May Re: Reti fence - 01/17/16 03:07 AM
Apparently he was a chess player. I have no idea, in answer to your question. I don't play, nor do I follow chess. I just combined The Reti Opening with Gabriel Oaks poor luck at the beginning of Far From The Madding Crowd. Coincidence I watched the movie on Thursday or Friday (HBO) and thought it went well with the quote by Sir Alan Bates.

Fact checking, I just now noticed that he, too, died of cancer at age 69. Strange enough for this week.
Posted By: May Decifering The Man of Law's Prologue and Tale - 01/18/16 05:18 PM
Brasst Hat- an eye popping headache causing ones head to explode.
laugh

BRASS HAT

PRONUNCIATION: (bras hat)

MEANING: noun: A high-ranking official, especially from the military or police.

ETYMOLOGY: From the gilt insignia worn on the cap. Also see brass ring, brass collar, brassy. Earliest documented use: 1887.

___________________________________


BRASSCAT Out, you impudent metal statue of a feline!

BASS HAT - for discriminating fishermen

BRA'S SHOT - need a new Maidenform
Posted By: wofahulicodoc what you carry a Hacky in - 01/19/16 09:32 PM

SACKCLOTH

PRONUNCIATION: (SAK-kloth)

MEANING: noun:
1. A coarse cloth of jute, flax, etc., used for making sacks.
2. A garment made of this cloth, worn to express remorse, humility, grief, etc.
3. An expression of penitence, mourning, humility, etc.

ETYMOLOGY: From the Bible in which wearing of sackcloth and sprinkling of ashes is indicated as a sign of repentance, mourning, humility, etc. Earliest documented use: before 1400.

_______________________________________

Is "epithet" when one word is almost always associated with another, like "rosy-fingered / dawn" in Homer? I've never heard of "Sackcloth" when it wasn't followed by "and ashes"...
_______________________________________

SACKCLOTH - 1. Hoity-toity name for sheeets

and in the same vein (so to speak)
SACKCLOTS - pulmonary thromboemboli from too much bed rest
and
SACKSLOTH - major-league couch potato

BACKCLOTH - what the shirt is made of that I'd give you off mine

Posted By: wofahulicodoc bound by custom - 01/20/16 01:44 PM

STRAIGHTLACED
or STRAITLACED

PRONUNCIATION: (STRAYT-layst)

MEANING: adjective: Excessively strict, rigid, old-fashioned, or prudish.

ETYMOLOGY: From Middle English streit (narrow), from Old French estreit, from Latin strictus, past particle of stringere (to bind, draw tight) + laqueus (noose). Earliest documented use: 1630.
__________________________________

STRAINLACED - wearing an EXTREMELY tight corset

STRAIGHTLACKED - poker player went bust

STRAIGHTLAXED - booked non-stop to Los Angeles
Posted By: May Re: bound by custom - 01/20/16 05:27 PM
straight-maced - living without bear hugs

straight-paced - living


Potential as a spoiler~

“The Revenant”: An Interview With Costume Designer Jacqueline West
Authenticity and Symbolism
Posted By: May path of least resistance - 01/21/16 04:13 PM
sandsculotte- bathing suit made of sand; circa 2016


Bathing is a sport
Enjoyed by great and small
In suits of any sort
Though better none at all.
[Anonymous, 19th-century poem]
history of bating suits
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: path of least resistance - 01/21/16 05:15 PM
After perusing your site, I agree with ' none at all '.

SANSCULOTTE
or SANS-CULOTTE

PRONUNCIATION: (sanz-kyoo-LOT)

MEANING: noun:
1. An extreme radical republican during the French Revolution.
2. A radical or revolutionary.

ETYMOLOGY: From French, literally, without knee breeches. In the French Revolution, this was the aristocrats’ term of contempt for the ill-clad volunteers of the Revolutionary army who rejected knee breeches as a symbol of the upper class and adopted pantaloons. As often happens with such epithets, the revolutionaries themselves adopted it as a term of pride. Earliest documented use: 1790.
___________________________________


SASS-CULOTTE - hot pants

SAN OSCULOTTE - Valentine, the Kissing Saint

SANS-CURLOTTE - just donated all her ringlets to Locks of Love
Posted By: May Sayeth the sooth - 01/22/16 02:42 PM
Sootleg- firefighter of the Moab Desert Peoples
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Das Boot - 01/22/16 11:16 PM

BOOTLEG

PRONUNCIATION: (BOOT-leg)

MEANING:
verb tr., intr.: To make, sell, or transport something illegally.
noun: Something illegally made, sold, or distributed.
adjective: Made, sold, or distributed illegally.

ETYMOLOGY: From the practice of concealing a liquor flask in the leg of a boot. Earliest documented use: 1889.
____________________________________

BOOTLUG - the nut used to keep the trunk of a British vehicle locked

BOATLEG - one part of a sailing race

BOOTLOG - the daily entries of a German U-boat commander
Posted By: Tromboniator Also water on the knee - 01/23/16 08:35 PM
BOATLEG - having undergone a ship replacement.

Oops, sorry, Wofa. I didn't see you there.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Also water on the knee - 01/24/16 02:06 AM

No huhu; never a problem having another definition!
Posted By: May Carl! - 01/25/16 06:43 AM
autolycans- are one of the primary factions in the transformer mythos
Posted By: wofahulicodoc esoterica warning - 01/26/16 02:37 AM

AUTOLYCAN

PRONUNCIATION: (o-TOL-uh-kuhn)

MEANING: adjective: Characterized by thievery or trickery.

ETYMOLOGY: From Autolycus, the son of Hermes and Chione in Greek mythology, who was skilled in theft and trickery. He was able to make himself (or things he touched) invisible, which greatly helped him in his trade. Shakespeare named a con artist after Autolycus in A Winter’s Tale. Earliest documented use: 1890.
__________________________________

AUTOGLYCAN - a long chain-like molecule that forms out of a soup of small sugar molecules without need of a catalyst

TAUTOLYCAN - self-evidently able

ALTOLYCAN - a she-wolf with a low-pitched voice
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: esoterica warning - 01/26/16 06:55 AM
AUTOLYCAB – self-propelled taxi, as distinguished from a cab that is propelled horsely.
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: esoterica warning - 01/26/16 04:49 PM
"...propelled horsely" crazy
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: esoterica warning - 01/26/16 08:02 PM

HERCULEAN

PRONUNCIATION: (hur-kyuh-LEE-uhn, hur-KYOO-lee-)

MEANING: adjective:
1. Requiring extraordinary strength or effort.
2. Having great strength or size.

ETYMOLOGY: From Hercules, the son of Zeus and Alcmene in Greek mythology. Hercules performed many feats requiring extraordinary strength and effort, such as cleaning the Augean stables. Earliest documented use: 1594.
_____________________________

FERCULEAN - made of iron and copper

HERCLEAN - Mr Clean's wife

HERCULEXAN - an extremely strong clear plastic to form into storm windows and doors (see also "Gorilla Glass")
Posted By: wofahulicodoc major moon of Saturn - 01/27/16 01:32 PM

TITAN

PRONUNCIATION: (TYT-n)

MEANING: noun: A person, organization, or thing of great strength, size, or achievement.

ETYMOLOGY: From Titan, any of a family of giant gods in Greek mythology who were overthrown by Zeus and company. Atlas was a titan. Earliest documented use: 1412.
________________________________

TIXAN - along with chiggers, what you get camping out if you aren't careful

MITAN - 1. what the three little kitans lost;
2. a graduate of an engineering school in Cambridge, MA

TATAN - a plaid worn by the Boston Scottish

SIREN SONG

PRONUNCIATION: (SYR-uhn song)

MEANING: noun: An enticing appeal that ultimately leads to disaster.

ETYMOLOGY: From Siren, one of a group of sea nymphs, whose enchanting singing lured sailors to shipwreck on the rocks around their island. Also see femme fatale. Earliest documented use: 1568.
____________________________


STIREN' SONG - a real tear-jerker

SIRE NO SONG - words from the Jester with laryngitis

SIREN BONG - too many smokers at once really make it wail
SIREN SON – seems that one of those sailors actually made it.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc ...hence "bacchanalia" - 01/29/16 10:30 PM

BACCHANT

PRONUNCIATION: (buh-KANT, -KAHNT, BAK-uhnt)

MEANING: noun: A boisterous reveler.

ETYMOLOGY: From Bacchus, the god of wine in Roman mythology. His Greek equivalent is Dionysus who gave us the word dionysian. Earliest documented use:1699.
_____________________________

BATCHANT - one of a small army of six-legged arthropods

BACCHIANT - simultaneously smoking and drinking cheap wine from a straw-wrapped bottle

BACHCHANT - Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring
Posted By: wofahulicodoc The Hurkle is a Happy Beast - 02/01/16 02:38 PM

YERK

PRONUNCIATION: (yuhrk)

MEANING:
verb tr., intr.: To rise, stir, strike, whip, pull, kick, etc.
noun: A sudden movement, kick, jerk, stab, etc.

ETYMOLOGY: Of uncertain origin. Perhaps imitative. Earliest documented use: 1424.

_____________________________

YEARK - the First Millennium

YEROK - just a scratch; don't worry, it'll heal before the wedding

BYERK - the tennis player is an idiot
Live and learn.
_______________________________

UNCO

PRONUNCIATION: (UHNG-koh)

MEANING:
adjective: Unusual; remarkable; strange.
adverb: Remarkably; extremely.
noun: 1. A stranger. 2. News.

ETYMOLOGY: A variant of uncouth, from uncuth, from un- (not) + cuth (known), from cunnan (to know). Ultimately from the Indo-European root gno- (to know), which also gave us know, recognize, acquaint, ignore, diagnosis, notice, normal, agnosia, anagnorisis, prosopagnosia, cognize, gnomon, and kenning. Earliest documented use: 1410.
____________________________________

UNCOA -
1. the Other Aluminum Company ("Aluminium," if you prefer)
2. 7-Up's Christmas ad campaign (no L)

FUNCO - Walt Disney Inc, after the makeover

UNGO - Come again?
Posted By: LukeJavan8 - - -Go - 02/02/16 10:43 PM
UNTO all the Nations.....
Posted By: wofahulicodoc T. Cruzi is a parasite - 02/03/16 02:05 PM

SAGA

PRONUNCIATION: (SAH-guh)

MEANING: noun: 1. A long narrative of heroic exploits. 2. A long detailed report.

ETYMOLOGY: From Old Norse, literally (narrative). Originally, a saga was an Old Norse or Icelandic prose narrative dealing with historic or legendary figures. Earliest documented use: 1709.

_______________________________

SHAGA - a parasitic disease caused by a trypanosome, endemic to Mexico, Central and South America

SPAGA - a large hunk of pasta; a little one is a Spaghet, pl. Spaghetti

SANGA - Funiculi, Funicula emerging from a bar in Milan
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: T. Cruzi is a parasite - 02/03/16 04:04 PM

SPAGA - a large hunk of pasta; a little one is a Spaghet, pl. Spaghetti
laugh
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: T. Cruzi is a parasite - 02/04/16 05:48 AM
JAGA – narrative of a really long bender or cry.

DIEL

PRONUNCIATION: (DY-uhl, deel)

MEANING:
noun: A period of 24 hours.
adjective: Lasting 24 hours or having a 24-hour period.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin dies (day), which also gave us adjourn, diary, diet, circadian, journal, journey, quotidian, and sojourn. Earliest documented use: 1934.
_____________________________________

DO-EL - Christmas with a very stuffed nose

DIELA - the one who turns over the cards in a Boston casino

DIXEL - a single element in a double-density computer-generated image
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Winged Victory - 02/05/16 04:02 PM

ALAR

PRONUNCIATION: (AY-luhr)

MEANING: adjective: 1. Relating to wings; wing-shaped. 2. Relating to the armpit.

EDIT: "Armpit"? That's AXIL/AXILLARY. Is it ALA too?)

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin ala (wing), which also gave us aisle and aileron. Earliest documented use: 1791.

______________________________

ALARA - OSHA jargon for radiation safety: acronym for "As Low As Reasonably Achievable"

ALER - a pub-crawler with very limited taste

AR-AR - a Cockney pirate's 'earty laugh
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: Winged Victory - 02/08/16 07:11 PM

MAECENAS

PRONUNCIATION: (mee-SEE-nuhs, mi-)

MEANING: noun: A generous patron, especially of art, music, or literature.

ETYMOLOGY: From Gaius Cilnius Maecenas (c. 70-8 BCE), patron of Horace and Virgil. Earliest documented use: 1542.
________________________________

MAXECENAS - very-large-scale Hollywood mob scenes

MAKECENAS - draw attention to oneself in a very public fashion

MALECENAS - (pron. MA-lay-SAY-noss) very bad dinners prepared by a Madrid chef
Posted By: wofahulicodoc you mean it's not clarified butter? - 02/10/16 03:30 AM

GUY

PRONUNCIATION: (guy)

MEANING:
noun: A man (in plural, persons of either sex).
verb tr.: To make fun of; ridicule.

noun: A rope to steady, guide, or secure something.
verb tr.: To steady, guide, or secure something with a rope.

ETYMOLOGY:
For set 1:After Guy Fawkes (1570-1606), a conspirator in the failed attempt to blow up England’s Parliament in 1605. Earliest documented use: 1874.

For set 2: From Old French guie (guide), from guier (to guide). Ultimately from the Indo-European root weid- (to see), which is also the source of guide, wise, vision, advice, idea, story, history, polyhistor, invidious, hades, eidos, eidetic, previse, vidimus, and vizard. Earliest documented use: 1375.
______________________________________

QUY - what you use to unlock the door to the pagoda

AGUY - feelng like you're coming down with the flu

GNUY - nickname for a baby wildebeest

VICTORIAN

PRONUNCIATION: (vik-TOR-ee-uhn)

MEANING: adjective:
1. Prudish; outdated; exaggeratedly proper; hypocritical.
2. Relating to the period of the reign of Queen Victoria (1837-1901).
3. Relating to ornate architecture, furnishings, etc., characteristic of the period.

ETYMOLOGY: After Queen Victoria of the UK (1819-1901). Earliest documented use: 1839.

_____________________________________

VICTO-RICAN - pertaining to the capture of a pirate ship full of plunder

VICTOURIAN - being taken around a famous old London theater

VECTORIAN - 1. having both a magnitude and a direction
2. pertaining to the spread of disease via an intermediate species

GONGORISM

PRONUNCIATION: (GONG-uh-riz-uhm)

MEANING: noun: An affected literary style marked by intricate language and elaborate figures of speech.

ETYMOLOGY: After Spanish baroque poet Luis de Góngora y Argote (1561-1627). Earliest documented use: 1813.

NOTES: Some Gongorisms from Luis de Góngora y Argote:
• La vida es ciervo herido, que las flechas le dan alas. (Life is a wounded stag in whom the fast-stuck arrows function as wings.)
• A batallas de amor, campo de pluma. (Feathers are love’s most fitting battle-ground.)
____________________________________________

GOGORISM - Disco music beat

GONGPRISM - a special piezo-sonic crystal that reverberates when white light shines through it

GONORISM - combining a venereal disease with an ineffective contraceptive method


ADDISONIAN

PRONUNCIATION: (ad-uh-SO-nee-uhn)

MEANING: adjective: Having clarity and elegance.

ETYMOLOGY: After Joseph Addison (1672-1719), English essayist and poet. Earliest documented use: 1789.

NOTES: Some aphorisms by Addison:
-- What sculpture is to a block of marble, education is to a human soul.
-- Three grand essentials to happiness in this life are something to do, something to love, and something to hope for.
-- Content thyself to be obscurely good. When vice prevails, and impious men bear sway, the post of honor is a private station.
__________________________________

[This definition applies to the Addison of Addison and Steele, the two pioneering journalists of the
Tatler and the Spectator. These days the eponym is more likely to be associated with Dr. Thomas Addison, who "...first described the clinical presentation of primary adrenocortical insufficiency (Addison disease) in 1855 in his classic paper...". Even as a cardiologist I know Addison's Disease and Addisonian Crisis. If your adrenal glands don't make hydrocortisone, you're in BIG trouble, believe me.
-- Wofahulicodoc]

_______________________________________

ADDASONIAN - adopt a male child into your family

DADDISONIAN - Patriarchal

EDDISONIAN - figured out by the inventor AFTER he received his Doctorate in Education

MEGRIM

PRONUNCIATION: (MEE-grim)

MEANING: noun:
1. (In plural, megrims) Low spirits.
2. Whim.
3. Migraine.

ETYMOLOGY: From misreading of in as m in the word migraine. From French migraine, from Latin hemicrania (pain in one side of the head), from Greek hemi- (half) + kranion (skull). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ker- (horn or head), which also gave us unicorn, horn, hornet, rhinoceros, reindeer, carrot, carat, and cerebrate. Earliest documented use: 1440.
________________________

HEGRIM - the other guy doesn't feel so good

MEGRAM - a narcissist's billet-doux

MUGRIM - where the lipstick goes
Posted By: wofahulicodoc We are not amused - 02/17/16 03:21 AM

POSTHUMOUS

PRONUNCIATION: (POS-chuh-muhs)

MEANING: adjective: Happening after someone’s death, but relating to something done earlier. For example, a book published after the death of the author, a child born after the death of the father, an award given after the death of a person.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin posthumus, alteration of postumus, superlative of posterus (coming after). The word literally means “subsequent” but since it was often used in contexts relating to someone’s death, people began associating the word with humus (earth) or humare (to bury) and amended the spelling. Earliest documented use: 1608.
_________________________________

POSTHUMORUS - translation of "LOL"

POSTHUMOUR - British translation of "LOL"

PESTHUMOUS - soil with earthworms in it
Posted By: wofahulicodoc ...and bushytailed - 02/17/16 01:37 PM

LUTESTRING

PRONUNCIATION: (LOOT-string)

MEANING: noun: A glossy silk fabric.

ETYMOLOGY: This fabric has nothing to do with a lute string. The word is a corruption of French lustrine, from Italian lustrino, from Latin lustrare (to make bright). Ultimately from the Indo-European root leuk- (light), which also gave us lunar, lunatic, light, lightning, lucid, illuminate, illustrate, translucent, lux, lynx, pellucid, lucubrate, limn, levin, and lea. Earliest documented use: 1661.
______________________________________

LUTESTRINE - the latest contraceptive

LURESTRING - what your well-dressed Siren wears

CUTESTRING - a long line of puppies and kittens and penguin chicks and
panda cubs and the like
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: We are not amused - 02/17/16 09:17 PM
POSTHUMMOUS - relating to that after-garbonzoid feeling.

MESSUAGE

PRONUNCIATION: (MES-wij)

MEANING: noun: A residential building with outbuildings and the attached land.

ETYMOLOGY: From the misreading of the letter n as u in Old French mesnage (household), from Latin manere (to remain, dwell). Ultimately from the Indo-European root men- (to remain), which also gave us manor, mansion, ménage, immanent, permanent, menagerie, menial, and remain. Earliest documented use: 1490.
_______________________________

MASSUAGE - (pron. mass-WAGE) - paying everybody at least $15/hour!

MESSUAVE - (pron. me-SWAV) - "I am the smoothest!"

MESSTAGE - (pron mess-STAGE) - after the wild theater party
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Picture that! - 02/19/16 07:51 PM

FRONTISPIECE

PRONUNCIATION: (FRUN-ti-spees)

MEANING: noun:
1. An illustration facing or preceding the title page of a book.
2. A facade, especially an ornamental facade, of a building.
3. An ornamental pediment over a door or window.

ETYMOLOGY: The word was formed by corruption of French frontispice by association with the word ‘piece’. It’s from Latin frontispicium (facade), from front- (front) + specere (to look). Ultimately from the Indo-European root spek- (to observe), which also gave us spy, spice, species, suspect, expect, spectrum, despise, despicable, bishop, telescope, specious, speciesism, soupcon, prospicient, perspicuous, speculum, omphaloskepsis, and conspectus. Earliest documented use: 1598.

_______________________________________________

FRONDISPIECE - many leaflets of a fern, all on one single stem

FRONTISPICE - the most prominent condiment in the cabinet, often a chili or a curry

FRONTISPIERCE - a direct attack from straight ahead using a sharp instrument

Posted By: wofahulicodoc nerd alert - 02/22/16 01:28 PM

PIACULAR

PRONUNCIATION: (pie-AK-yuh-luhr)

MEANING: adjective: Making or requiring atonement.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin piare (to appease). Earliest documented use: 1606.
___________________________________


PIARCULAR - extending half-way around a circle (measured in radians)

SPIACULAR - the latest James Bond flick

APIACULAR - a truly overwhelming swarm of bees
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: nerd alert - 02/23/16 10:51 PM
PIOCULAR (also pinocular) - glasses with piarcular lenses
Posted By: wofahulicodoc DEMOTICK: See my metronome - 02/24/16 03:01 AM

DEMOTIC

PRONUNCIATION: (di-MOT-ik)

MEANING:
adjective: Relating to common people; popular.
noun: Modern Greek.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek demos (people). Earliest documented use: 1782.
_________________________


DEMONTIC - gives the worst Lyme infection ever

DEMOTEC - computerized Show-and-Tell

DEMOSTIC - Superglue


Posted By: wofahulicodoc Occam's Razor, in principle... - 02/24/16 07:58 PM

PARSIMONY

PRONUNCIATION: (PAR-si-mo-nee)

MEANING: noun: Excessive frugality; stinginess.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin parsimonia, from parcere (to spare). Earliest documented use: 1475.
____________________________

PARISIMONY - how you finance the trip to France after the divorce

FARSIMONY - "pool" is as close a transliteration as I can find, written as one of these. The currency of Iran is the rial.

PARSIPONY - a town in New Jersey
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: Occam's Razor, in principle... - 02/24/16 09:22 PM
PARSNIMONY – 1. Mon(e)y is the root of all evil. 2. A replacement for the gold standard.

PARSIMON
– A tree that is reluctant to give up its orange fruit.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc appetite spoiler alert - 02/25/16 02:30 PM

GAUCHERIE

PRONUNCIATION: (goh-shuh-REE)

MEANING: noun: A lack of tact or grace; also an instance of this.

ETYMOLOGY: From French gauche (literally left-handed, awkward), from gauchir (to turn). Earliest documented use: 1798.
______________________________

GAUCHO-ERIE - folly on the pampas

LAUCHERIE - underwear for Cape Canaveral

GACHERIE - gourmet food for Klingons
Posted By: wofahulicodoc no window top-dressing here - 02/26/16 08:48 PM

VALENCE

PRONUNCIATION: (VAY-luhns)

MEANING: noun:
1. The combining capacity of an atom or a group of atoms to form molecules.
2. The capacity of someone or something to affect another.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin valentia (power, worth, or strength), from valere (to be well or strong). Ultimately from the Indo-European root wal- (to be strong) that also gave us valiant, avail, valor, value, wieldy, countervail, valetudinarian, and valorize, Earliest documented use: 1425.
_________________________

VALENE - one of the ameno acids

VIALENCE(1) - the orchestral string section

VIALENCE(2) - riot in the perfume-bottling factory
Posted By: wofahulicodoc no real property allowed - 02/29/16 04:48 PM

PERSONALTY

PRONUNCIATION: (PUHR-suh-nuhl-tee)

MEANING: noun: Personal property: movable property, as contrasted with real estate.

ETYMOLOGY: From Anglo-French personalté, from Latin personalitas, from persona (mask, person), from Etruscan phersu, from Greek prosopa (face, mask). Earliest documented use: 1528.
__________________________________

PERSONALTA - a high muckety-muck of the feminine gender

PERSONASTY - any one of many unpleasant folk

PARSONALTY - things owned by a local church officer
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Historians R Us, said Barbara - 03/01/16 07:52 PM

TRUCHMAN

PRONUNCIATION: (TRUHCH-muhn)

MEANING: noun: An interpreter.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin turchemannus, from Arabic tarjuman, from Aramaic turgemana, from Akkadian targumanu (interpreter). Earliest documented use: 1485.
___________________________

TRACHMAN - the guy who puts the hole in your throat so you can breathe better

TRUTHMAN - a Fair Witness, male gender

TRUCHBAN - no cargo vehicles with more than two axles allowed
Posted By: May I just called to say...surprise! - 03/02/16 07:10 AM
Popinsay- a children's toy that outwardly consists of a box with ocular-based biometric technology. When the unique patterns on a person's retina blood vessels is recognized it plays a melody. The melody utilizes synthesizers for ancillary effects.

POPINJAY

PRONUNCIATION: (POP-in-jay)

MEANING: noun: Someone who indulges in vain and empty chatter.

ETYMOLOGY: Via French and Spanish from Arabic babbaga (parrot). The last syllable changed to jay because some thought the word referred to that bird instead of a parrot. Earliest documented use: 1322.
_________________________


POPINDAY - A holiday in honour of British Nannies in general and author P.L. Travers' character in particular

POPINJAW - vernacular for TMJ syndrome (temporo-mandibular joint)

POPINJOY - the gleeful pleasure of bubble-wrap
POPENJAY's - the Pope's PJ's.

ARSENIOUS

PRONUNCIATION: (ahr-SEE-nee-uhs)

MEANING: adjective: Relating to or containing arsenic (especially when trivalent).

ETYMOLOGY: From Old French arsenic, from Latin arsenicum, from Greek arsenikon (yellow orpiment), from Arabic zarnik, from Persian zar (gold). Ultimately from the Indo-European root ghel- (to shine), which also gave us yellow, gold, glimmer, glimpse, glass, gloaming, melancholy, and choleric. Earliest documented use: 1818.
_____________________

ARENIOUS - occurring in a place with seats all around so a lot of people can watch

ARSENIORS - the class that's going to graduate at the end of the year

ARSENIONUS - Mr Hall's burden
Posted By: May When it's in tea it has a distinct odor... - 03/03/16 03:57 PM
Arsenios- Irish for a thing that is an arse.

"At least people in plays act like they've got sense." Dr. Einstein, Arsenic and Old Lace

Arsenios- a new fad that brings back "Hammer Time", joggers
ABSENIOUS – Rather inclined not to be here.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc and don't forget the allegro - 03/04/16 06:41 PM

BRIO

PRONUNCIATION: (BREE-oh)

MEANING: noun: Vigor or vivacity.

ETYMOLOGY: From Italian brio (liveliness), from Spanish brio (spirit), from Celtic brigos (strength). Earliest documented use: 1731.
_____________________________

BRRIO - cold but spirited

ORIO - egotistical sandwich cream cookie

GRIO - a Spanish cricket

Posted By: Tromboniator Re: and don't forget the allegro - 03/04/16 08:11 PM
BRION –One of a pair of bonded charged particles.
Posted By: LukeJavan8 Re: and don't forget the allegro - 03/05/16 05:27 PM
BRIOS - alternate spelling for name (Bruce, Bryce,Brace, etc.)
Posted By: May Art though where - 03/06/16 05:16 AM
Brioh- Oh! Brother
Posted By: wofahulicodoc mischief afoot! - 03/07/16 05:22 PM

CHICANE

PRONUNCIATION: (shi-KAYN)

MEANING: verb tr.: To trick or deceive.
noun: 1. Deception. 2. An artificial narrowing or a turn added to a road to slow traffic down.
____________________________

[Doesn't it also mean, in Bridge, void in a suit?]

____________________________

ETYMOLOGY: From French chicaner (to quibble). Earliest documented use: 1672.
_________________________

CHICAGE - the alternative to free-range pullets

CHICARE - Medical Assistance for the impoverished and uninsured in urban Illinois

CHOCANE - when she got older, Harry Potter's first crush developed a sore hip and used this
Posted By: May Re: mischief afoot! - 03/08/16 07:04 PM
Chipane- bubbly drink, often imbibed as part of a celebration (she a pain) when wife is out of town.
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: mischief afoot! - 03/09/16 03:45 AM

DEROGATE

PRONUNCIATION: (DER-uh-gayt)

MEANING: verb tr.: To disparage or belittle.
verb intr.: 1. To detract from (authority, value, etc.). 2. To deviate from (a standard, for example).

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin derogare (to repeal), from de- (from) + rogare (to ask, propose a law). Ultimately from the Indo-European root reg- (to move in a straight line, to lead or rule), which is also the source of regime, direct, rectangle, erect, rectum, alert, source, surge, abrogate, and queen regnant. Earliest documented use: 1513.
__________________________________

AEROGATE - scandal at Boeing

ZEROGATE - a binary Maxwell's Demon, which selectively excludes ones

DEDOGATE - what happened to my homework
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Man is the only animal who plays? - 03/09/16 02:03 PM

LUDIC

PRONUNCIATION: (LOO-dik)

MEANING: adjective: Relating to play; playful.

ETYMOLOGY: From French ludique, from Latin ludere (to play), from ludus (play). Ultimately from Indo-European root leid- (to play), which is also the ancestor of allude, collude, delude, elude, illusion, ludicrous, and Ludo. Earliest documented use: 1940.

______________________________________

LUPIC - wolfish

LAUDIC - complimentary

LUXIC - very bright (and energy-efficient; see also LEDIC)
Posted By: wofahulicodoc I didn't know he was broken - 03/10/16 01:32 PM

ALTERCATE

PRONUNCIATION: (AL-tuhr-kayt)

MEANING: verb intr.: To argue or dispute heatedly.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin altercari (to quarrel with another), from alter (other). Earliest documented use: 1530.
__________________________________

ALTARCATE - when religious extremists of two different faiths have a disagreement

ALTERCYTE - a stem cell that just differentiated

ALTERCAT - Garfield got fixed
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: I didn't know he was broken - 03/10/16 08:26 PM
ALTERCAFE – Put stuff into your morning beverage.
ALTERCASE – Press the shIFt key.
ACTERCATE - Blanchett
Posted By: May Re: I didn't know he was broken - 03/11/16 12:09 PM
Tomplot- Tom and Jerry's ensuing mayhem and destruction

Domplot- is that the reason your security certificate is often in question? Whodunit?
Posted By: wofahulicodoc COPLOT - partner in crime... - 03/11/16 06:18 PM

COMPLOT

PRONUNCIATION:
(KOM-plot, for verb: kuhm-PLOT)

MEANING: noun: A plot or conspiracy.
verb tr., intr.: To plot or conspire.

ETYMOLOGY: From French complot (crowd, plot). Earliest documented use: 1577.

_________________________

COMAPLOT - Cliff Notes for Robin Cook's book

COMPLOST - I can't find my free tickets

COWPLOT - Where's the beef?
Posted By: May Re: COPLOT - partner in crime... - 03/13/16 02:53 AM
Camplot- good taste of bad taste mentalese
Posted By: wofahulicodoc I'm puzzled by this one - 03/14/16 03:00 PM

REBUS

PRONUNCIATION: (REE-buhs)

MEANING: noun: A representation of a word or phrase using pictures, symbols, letters, etc.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin rebus (by things), from res (thing). Earliest documented use: 1605.
______________________________________

H.R.E.BUS - public transportation in the days of Charlemagne

RE-BAUS - to look up again in the authoritative Crossword Puzzle Dictionary

REB-OUS - characterized by old Southern chivalry

CALLIGRAM

PRONUNCIATION:
(KAL-i-gram)

MEANING:
noun: A word, phrase, or piece of text arranged to form a picture of the subject described.

ETYMOLOGY: From French calligramme, from Greek calli- (beautiful) + -gram (something written). Earliest documented use: 1923. A word with the same root is callipygian.

NOTES: One of the best-known practitioners of the form was the French poet and writer Guillaume Apollinaire, whose work was published in the book Calligrammes.
____________________________________

CALLINGRAM - Here, Truckie, Here truckie!

CALLIGRAM - Hi, Nana, How're ya doing?

CARLIGRAM - Ran your Company into ground stop what made you think could do better as POTUS?
Callingram- technopathic mesage for guardian of the universe, Ram

Palligram- calling strength for someone in need
Posted By: wofahulicodoc and these ! - 03/16/16 03:20 PM

AMBIGRAM

PRONUNCIATION: (AM-bi-gram)

MEANING: noun: A word or phrase written in a manner that it reads the same (sometimes, a different word or phrase) when oriented in a different way, for example, when reflected or rotated.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin ambi- (both) + -gram (something written). Earliest documented use: 1985.
______________________________

(look up Scott Kim for more on the subject of Ambigrams!)
______________________________

AMBIGAM - kick equally well with left and right leg

AMEBIGRAM - letter to a one-celled protozoan

AMIGRAM - Son, did your wife give birth yet?
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: and these ! - 03/17/16 01:31 AM
ABBIGRAM – My boss wants me to salute when she comes into my office, and my sister's hamster accuses me of stealing his food in the middle of the night. What should I do?

AMBIGRAD – An alumnus who couldn't decide on a major.
Posted By: May Face - 03/17/16 10:27 AM
Pangram- veil of veronica

Pangaram- outta the frying pan and into the fire

Pangrim- "I can't help this stupid look." "That's for scarin' me outa ten years of my life, I cant spare."
Posted By: wofahulicodoc alphabet soup - 03/17/16 12:44 PM

PANGRAM

PRONUNCIATION: (PAN-gram, -gruhm, PANG-)

MEANING: noun: A sentence that makes use of all the letters of the alphabet.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek pan- (all) + -gram (something written). Earliest documented use: 1873.

NOTES: The best-known pangram is: The quick brown fox jumps over a lazy dog. Here’s a pangram that makes use of the whole alphabet in a 26-letter sentence: Mr. Jock, TV quiz PhD, bags few lynx

______________________________

PANGRAY - the entire Fifty Shades series in one short Readers Digest Condensed Book

PANTRAM - stuff yourself into trousers that are way too small

PAYGRAM - how your salary gets electronically deposited straight into your bank account
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: alphabet soup - 03/18/16 10:04 PM

ACROSTIC

PRONUNCIATION: (a-KRAW-stik, a-KRAWS-tik)

MEANING: noun: A composition in which the first letter of each line spells out a word or message.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin acrostichis, from Greek akrostikhis, from akron (head) + stikhos (line). Earliest documented use: 1585. A word with the same root is acrophobia.

NOTES: When the spelled-out word is in the middle (instead of from the initial letters), it’s called a mesostic (example). Also see, a meta acrostic.
______________________________

AEROSTIC - used by pilots to make the plane go up, down, or sideways

ACROUTIC - soup from which all the buttons have been removed

LACROSTIC - (I don't think I even need to finish this!)
Posted By: May Re: alphabet soup - 03/20/16 01:35 PM
Acrostich- pass time of yore

Nacrostic- deep cover federal agent sent to the reservation

Acrosstic- hell bent tic
Posted By: Tromboniator Re: alphabet soup - 03/20/16 07:10 PM
Originally Posted By: wofahulicodoc

LACROSTIC - (I don't think I even need to finish this!)


YES‼️

BEMA

PRONUNCIATION: (BEE-muh)
plural bemata, bemas

Ed.: I've seen it more often as "BIMA"

MEANING: noun: 1. A platform for speaking. 2. An area around the altar in a place of worship.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek bema (step, platform), from bainein (to go). Earliest documented use: 1683.
________________________________

ABEMA - dyslexic protozoan

BEEMA - the Hive Queen

BEGA - a Boston Brahmin fallen on hard times
Posted By: wofahulicodoc a day late, due to server troubles - 03/23/16 06:29 PM

QUALE

PRONUNCIATION: (KWA-lee, -lay)
plural qualia

MEANING: noun: A quality or property as perceived by a person: a subjective experience.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin qualis (or what kind). Earliest documented use: 1654.
___________________________

QUALE - an orthographically-challenged Vice-Presidential candidate

'QUALL - a short intense rainstorm with gusts of high winds, described by
a fisherman with a 'peech impediment

QUALER - a sportsman who hunts small game birds for fun (and sometimes dinner)

STARETS

PRONUNCIATION: (STAHR-its, -yits)
plural startsy

MEANING: noun: A religious teacher or adviser.

ETYMOLOGY: From Russian starets (elder). In the Eastern Orthodox Church a starets is a spiritual adviser who is not necessarily a priest. Earliest documented use: 1923.
_______________________________


STARETSK - plainclothes cop from a 70s TV show. (pl STARTSKY, usually found working with HUTCH)

STARETH - see title above

OSTARETS - miniature blenders

STARPETS - Lassie, and Rin-Tin-Tin, and sometimes Topper's Neil or The Thin Man's Asta.
(Do I date myself, or what? And why are they all dogs?)
Starnets

Posted By: wofahulicodoc (If I had an "I" I'd be much smarter) - 03/24/16 02:16 PM

GENUS

PRONUNCIATION: (JEE-nuhs)
plural genera, genuses

MEANING: noun: 1. In biology, a group covering one or more species. 2. A kind, class, group, etc.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin genus (race, birth, kind). Earliest documented use: 1551.
_______________________________


GENNUS - the Book of Wurld Rekkerds

GELUS - covetous and grasping, but uneducated

GENUX - an computer Operating System only the nerdiest can use

PARIES

PRONUNCIATION: (PAR-ee-eez)
plural parietes

MEANING: noun: A wall of a body part or cavity.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin paries (wall). Earliest documented use: 1694. Also see parietal.
__________________________________

SPARIES - "do-over" (Mulligan) on the bowling alley

PARIEST - best golfer on the course

PHARIES - magical things happen when you adjust the acidity
Posted By: May Mother May I - 03/25/16 12:45 PM
[World] Parties-divided by a wall, pertaining to the parietal globe, otherwise known as "little man syndrome"
Posted By: May Re: Trump's idea of Paradise: Walled-In Pond - 03/25/16 12:47 PM
Originally Posted By: wofahulicodoc

PARIES

PRONUNCIATION: (PAR-ee-eez)
plural parietes

MEANING: noun: A wall of a body part or cavity.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin paries (wall). Earliest documented use: 1694. Also see parietal.
__________________________________

SPARIES - "do-over" (Mulligan) on the bowling alley

PARIEST - best golfer on the course

PHARIES - magical things happen when you adjust the acidity


Lol, walled in pond

CLARIGATION

PRONUNCIATION: (klar-i-GAY-shuhn)

MEANING: noun: A demand for restitution for some wrong, as a precursor to declaring war.

ETYMOLOGY: from Latin clarigare (to make clear), from clarus (clear). Earliest documented use: 1432.
________________________

CLAVIGATION - after they give you the Key to the City, finding your way around with it

CLARINATION - an entire country of woodwinds

CLARIGATICON - a statue used for the worship of Clarigat the Great
Posted By: wofahulicodoc APRILITY - the power to rain - 03/29/16 08:11 PM

APRICITY

PRONUNCIATION: (a-PRIS-i-tee)

MEANING: noun: Warmth of the sun; basking in the sun.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin apricari (to bask in the sun). Earliest documented use: 1623.
_______________________________

ATRICITY - the power is out all over

APRICOTY - like an orange fuzzy-skinned stoned fruit

CAPRICITY - goatiness
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: APRILITY - the power to rain - 03/30/16 10:51 PM

PUNALUA

PRONUNCIATION: (poo-nuh-LOO-uh)

MEANING: noun: A group of brothers marrying a group of sisters.

ETYMOLOGY: From Hawaiian. Earliest documented use: 1860.

_________________________________

PUMALUA - a pride of mountain lions looking for mates

PUNALOA - wordplay at the volcano

PUNALUAU - tell a bad joke and they make you eat your words
Posted By: May Punalua - 03/31/16 01:28 AM
Punalua- an optimized path to a collection of the lowest form of humor

Pinalua- a Polynesian pignatta

CONSTATIVE

PRONUNCIATION: (kuhn-STAY-tiv, KON-stuh-)

MEANING: noun: A statement that can be judged as true or false.
adjective: Capable of being true or false.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin constare (to stand firm). Earliest documented use: 1901. This word is often contrasted with performative.
_________________________________

CORNSTATIVE - pertaining to Iowa

CONESTATIVE - covered-wagonish

CONSTAFIVE - the number between four and six does not change
Posted By: May Horoscopes are rarely clear - 03/31/16 03:11 PM
Consnative-careful study of native terminology.

Context- To serve black drink to the natives.

Potential explanation- high tea, serving compost tea in the garden.

ENTOPTIC

PRONUNCIATION: (en-TOP-tik)

MEANING: adjective: Relating to images that originate within the eye (as opposed to images resulting from the light entering the eye).

Example: floaters, the thread-like fragments that appear to float in front of the eye but are caused by the matter within the eye.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek ento- (within) + optic (relating to the eye or sight). Earliest documented use: 1876

_______________________________________

BENTOPTIC - a twisted microscope lens

ENTOPHIC - inside the gouty lump

ENSTOPTIC - how to get rid of your inner twitch
Posted By: May Re: ENTOPTIC - the tree-creatures can see you ! - 04/01/16 09:28 PM
Kodama? ♡ Studio Ghibli. Princess Mononoke!

Endtoptic- fervent forward focus

LUNKHEAD

PRONUNCIATION: (LUNGK-hed)

MEANING: noun: A dull or slow-witted person.

ETYMOLOGY: From lunk (a blend of lump + hunk) + head. Earliest documented use: 1884.
_____________________________

FLUNKHEAD - repeating sixth grade for the third time

LINKHEAD - Port-a-Potty on the golf course

Lazy quiet day
Bullfrog jumps in the water
Listen! A LUNKHEARD!
Posted By: wofahulicodoc I hear you, I hear you - 04/06/16 02:16 AM

CLAIRAUDUEBCE CLAIRAUDIENCE

PRONUNCIATION: (kler-AW-dee-uhns)

MEANING: noun: The supposed ability to hear what is inaudible.

ETYMOLOGY: A blend of clairvoyance + audience (the act of hearing), from audire (to hear). Ultimately from the Indo-European root au- (to perceive), which also gave us audio, audit, obey, auditorium, anesthesia, aesthetic, and synesthesia. Earliest documented use: 1864.

______________________________


CLAVIRAUDIENCE - attendees at a Bach Recital

ECLAIRAUDIENCE - attendees at the dessert-chef competition

CLAIRAUDIFENCE - transparent barrier around a German car dealership
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: let me be clear about that - 04/06/16 02:50 PM

AFFLUENTIAL

PRONUNCIATION: (a-floo-EN-shuhl)

MEANING: adjective: Having power and influence because of wealth.
noun: Rich and powerful person.

ETYMOLOGY: A blend of affluence + influential. Both words are from Latin fluere (to flow). Ultimately from the Indo-European root bhleu- (to swell or overflow), from which flow words such as influence, fluctuate, fluent, fluid, fluoride, flush, flux, reflux, superfluous, fluvial, profluent, and affluenza. Earliest documented use: 1842.
______________________________________


AFLUENTIAL - without a chimney

LAFFLUENTIAL - manipulating with comedy

WAFFLUENTIAL - radiating uncertainty and indecision
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: let me be clear about that - 04/07/16 12:54 PM

BANKSTER

PRONUNCIATION: (BANGK-stuhr)

MEANING: noun: A banker who engages in dishonest or illegal behavior.

ETYMOLOGY: A blend of banker + gangster. From the derogatory suffix -ster which also gave us poetaster, mathematicaster, and philosophaster. Earliest documented use: 1893.
______________________________

BLANKSTER - Scrabble maven

BALKSTER - a singularly inept pitcher

BANKSITER - Feng Shui expert for the Bank of Nippon, who helps decide where new branches should be located
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: let me be clear about that - 04/08/16 05:27 PM

SHEEPLE

PRONUNCIATION: (SHEE-puhl)

MEANING: noun: People who unquestioningly accept what’s said by a political leader, marketer, etc.

ETYMOLOGY: A blend of sheep + people. Earliest documented use: 1945
___________________________

SKEEPLE - devotees of penny arcades

THEEPLE - the Amish

SHEMPLE - place to worship the Three Stooges
Posted By: May Re: let me be clear about that - 04/08/16 06:11 PM
smeeple- smees, no two 'smees' are alike
Posted By: wofahulicodoc ("It is I," if you insist) - 04/08/16 07:14 PM
Originally Posted By: May
smeeple- smees, no two 'smees' are alike


Knock, knock!
Who's there?
'Smee!
Originally Posted By: wofahulicodoc
Originally Posted By: May
smeeple- smees, no two 'smees' are alike


Knock, knock!
Who's there?
'Smee!


Structure Mapping Engine?
Subsequent Memory Effect?
Subject Matter Expert?
....Anomia? Anomie.

P.S. further intrigued, I found this...
http://m.phys.org/news/2010-03-free-illusion-biologist.html
"As Francis Crick said, 'dream as we may'..."

Posted By: wofahulicodoc Re: let me be clear about that - 04/11/16 12:29 PM

SNOWCLONE

PRONUNCIATION: (SNO-klon)

MEANING: noun: A cliché adapted to a new use.
For example, a statement of the form “X is the new Y” (such as “Gray is the new black”). See more examples here.

ETYMOLOGY: Coined by economics professor Glen Whitman in 2004, after the popular (but erroneous) idea that Eskimos have many words for snow, which is extended by others into the form: If Eskimos have N words for snow, X surely have N words for Y.
__________________________________

SNOWCLOWNE - Yeti

SNOBCLONE - a Kardashian

SNOWCLONK - what happens after you lose your balance on the skijump
Posted By: wofahulicodoc if you prefer your salad undressed - 04/12/16 07:12 PM

ECDYSIAST

PRONUNCIATION: (ek-DIZ-ee-ast)

MEANING: noun: A person who disrobes to provide entertainment for others.

ETYMOLOGY: Coined by writer and editor H.L. Mencken in 1940, from ecdysis (shedding or molting), from Greek ekdysis (casting off), from ek- (out) + dyein (to put on).
_______________________________________


ENDYSIAST - a person who puts clothes on for the entertainment of others

ECODYSIAST - a strip-tease artist who donates all the revenue for environmental preservation

ECDYSIASE - the enzyme that causes molting in snakes and insects (come to think of it, that might even be a real word ! )
Posted By: May Re: if you prefer your salad undressed - 04/13/16 12:06 AM
ewww!
icdysiast- not so merry-go-round

PETRICHOR

PRONUNCIATION: (PET-ri-kuhr)

MEANING: noun: The pleasant smell that accompanies the first rain after a dry spell.

ETYMOLOGY: Coined by researchers I.J. Bear and R.G. Thomas in 1964, from Greek petros (stone) + ichor (the fluid that supposedly flows in the veins of the gods in Greek mythology).
______________________________

PET ICHOR - The unpleasant smell of a dog after it's gotten soaked in the first rain after a dry spell

PETRICLOR (sometimes PETRICHLOR) - the smell of this bleach will turn you to stone

PET RICHER - Leona Helmsley's dog was her sole heir

PERI CHOR - the space around the singers
Posted By: May Re: PETRITHOR - the Marvel hero's stone hammer - 04/14/16 10:39 AM
Petrichour- neurasthenic dish akin to ducky dessert, made with broken english. Best served with friends for dinner.
Posted By: May Re: PETRITHOR - the Marvel hero's stone hammer - 04/14/16 11:03 AM
Expatnation- a pop-up restaurant that only serves humans. Not to be confused with cainablenation.

EXAPTATION

PRONUNCIATION: (ek-sap-TAY-shuhn)

MEANING: noun: The adaptation of a trait for a purpose other than for which it was evolved.
For example, feathers were evolved for warmth and later co-opted for display and/or flight.

ETYMOLOGY: Coined by Stephen Jay Gould in 1981. A blend of ex- (out) + adaptation, from ad- (towards) + aptare (to fit), from aptus (apt).
_____________________________

EXAPSTATION - where I used to get on the subway to go take my Advanced Placement test

MEXAPTATION - major blockbuster movie translated into Spanish

ERAPTATION - emergence from a trance-like state
Posted By: May Blet - 04/16/16 11:27 AM
Blep- one vowel short of a bleep

Blit- not enough z's to make the effort

Slet- vohd kee naee doo (self-evident Russian accent)

BLET

PRONUNCIATION: (blet)

MEANING: - verb tr.: To overripen to the point of rotting.

ETYMOLOGY: - Coined by the botanist John Lindley in 1835, from French blettir (to overripen).
__________________________________


BLERT - greeting from an affectionate kitten

ILET - a young egotist
Posted By: wofahulicodoc with its head - 04/18/16 05:49 PM

GALUMPH

PRONUNCIATION: (guh-LUMF)

MEANING: verb intr.: To move clumsily or heavily.

ETYMOLOGY: Coined by Lewis Carroll in his 1871 novel Through the Looking-Glass A blend of gallop + triumph.
___________________________________

GALYMPH - a large amount of oozing serum

GOALUMPH - hard work required to score

GALHUMPH - She is Not Amused
Posted By: wofahulicodoc Gimble did the Tove - 04/20/16 03:43 AM

SLITHY

PRONUNCIATION: (SLY-thee)

MEANING: adjective: Smooth and active; slimy; slithery.

ETYMOLOGY: Coined by Lewis Carroll in his 1871 novel Through the Looking-Glass. A blend of slimy + lithe.
____________________________

SLITSHY - embarrassed by having to go through tall narrow openings

USLITHY - fancy new name of the former United States Stone Company

SITHY - the Dark Side of the Force is strong with this one
Posted By: May Re: Gimble did the Tove - 04/20/16 10:51 AM