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Posted By: maderiye Jimmies - word origin - 08/16/02 12:32 PM
Much controversy over the origin of the word "Jimmies" the now-trademarked name for the chocolate sprinkles on ice cream. I had heard Jimmies was a derogatory name for black people and Jimmies (the dark sprinkles) were a take on that. The other explanations: A slang form of Jim-Jams (useless knick-knacks) and a guy named Jimmie working the machine.Though I can determine Jimmies were invented by Samuel Born, of the lollipop and marshmallow peep fame, I cannot find the origin of the word any help?

Posted By: wwh Re: Jimmies - word origin - 08/16/02 04:30 PM
Nothing added by here is a site about it:
http://www.word-detective.com/030299.html#jimmies

I think I first saw them some time shortly after WWII, in Massachusetts. Never heard any
derogatory association.

Posted By: AnnaStrophic Re: Jimmies - word origin - 08/16/02 04:44 PM
What country/region are you from? That info might help the rest of us, if you're serious . (I've never heard of "Jimmies" before, in any context).

Posted By: Hyla Jimmies are way serious - 08/16/02 07:51 PM
Jimmies is a Northeastern USA usage - they're called "sprinkles" or "chocolate sprinkles" (to distinguish them from the rainbow species) in the rest of the country. I may have heard them called something else too, but it isn't coming to mind.

I've no clue about the origin, but I'm leaving tomorrow for New England, and I'll be sure to have some while I'm there.

Posted By: WhitmanO'Neill Re: Jimmies are way serious - 08/16/02 09:15 PM
Jimmies is a Northeastern USA usage

Yup...Jimmies were always a fixture of ice-creamery in these parts. Every Carvel, Dairy Queen, and Kohr's Custard stand on the boardwalks have always offered chocolate jimmies, red jimmies (cherry), and even multi-colored jimmies. They usually have bins full of jimmies and just quickly dip the cone into the jimmies to lightly coat the ice cream. You can have jimmies sprinkled on sundaes, too, of course!

Posted By: sjm Re: Jimmies - word origin - 08/16/02 10:02 PM
When I read the title of this thread, I thought it was asking how "Jimmy" came to be the generic nickname for Glaswegians. Perhaps jmh would know.

Posted By: Capital Kiwi Re: Jimmies - word origin - 08/16/02 10:08 PM
I think it's because of a certain type of Glaswegian's propensity to call "Hey, Jimmy!" just before planting a Liverpool kiss on the bridge of your nose.

Posted By: sjm Re: Jimmies - word origin - 08/16/02 10:11 PM
Thanks, I thought as much myself

Posted By: wwh Re: Jimmies - word origin - 08/16/02 10:44 PM
A frustratingly incomplete claim for invention of jimmies:
Two yummy treats he invented chocolate jimmies and the chocolate coating for
ice cream are still popular today.

It seems beleivable, because it is about a large chocolate maker:
http://www.usbusiness-review.com/0108/09.html



I found another quote about him:
"The Just Born candy tradition was conceived in 1910, when Sam Born immigrated to
the Uniited States from Russia. A candy maker by trade, Born was ingenious in the use
of technology. Some of his more famous inventions include chocolate sprinkles, known as
"jimmies" and the hard coating on ice cream bars"

http://www.demko.com/opal0898.htm

at

Posted By: wow Re: tenuous connection to cones chocolate dipped - 08/17/02 08:10 PM
True Story : A pilot stationed at Pease AFB in the late 1960s received permission to take his young son and wife to the classified area where pilots sit in a mock cockpit and are are tested in various flight conditions through a operator-manned control panel which simulates emergency conditions so pilots can practice.
Oddly enought the mockups are called Flight Simulators."
The boy, in the co-pilot's seat was fascinated by the profusion of flight control dials in the Simulator.
"What do these do, Daddy?" the youngster asked. Whereupon Dad launched into a technical explanation of how the dials tell where you are, how fast you are flying, where other aircraft are, what the status of engines is, armament and all that. The boy became more and more confused. His eyes glazed over.
His mother standing on the Simulator wing step leaned over and said "Sweetheart, you know how when we get an ice cream cone and the man dips it in the Magic Chocolate and it freezes on the cone? "
"Yes, Mon" the child said, his face clearing.
"Well," Mom said, "all these dials are Daddy's Magic Chocolate."
Comprehension dawned in the boys eyes. "Oh, OK," he said hoping out of the simulator in triumph - leaving Dad stunned.
Motherhood triumphs again.
P.S. That youngster later flew in combat - and the name on the nose of his fighter aircraft was : "Magic Chocolate."

Posted By: wsieber Re: Jimmies - word origin - 08/19/02 01:02 PM
No direct relation to word origin, but..
When I was a child, we went to the Netherlands on holiday. The breakfast at the hotel was unforgettable. Among many other things there were those chocolate sprinkles on the table, to be sprinkled on the buttered bread. And we were told they are called "gestampte muisjes", which means: crushed mice.

Posted By: of troy gestampte muisjes! - 08/19/02 03:45 PM
Oh what i remember about breakfast in Amsterdam was "NY deli"-- hard crisp rolls, and thin, thin slices of ham, saugages, cheese, mustard, pickles and onions.
Served with great strong coffee!

but what a word, what an image! Crushed Mice!

(we have covered some of terms like this before-- so if this sets anyone thinking, you might want to search your term first.. One thread covered names for pasta shapes.. vermicelli-- little worms! and one was about funny names for other foods like pastries.. nun's fart! comes to mind!)

Posted By: RhubarbCommando Re: gestampte muisjes! - 08/20/02 09:30 AM
Over here, I think that "Jimmies" (a term I'd never come across before) are what we call either "Chocolate Vermicelli" (posh name) or "Mouse Dirts." This ties in very nicely with wsieber's and of troy's ideas.

Posted By: Jackie Re: Jimmies - word origin - 08/20/02 10:51 AM
Gestampte muisjes--of course! GM = Jimmy. I was surprised that no one mentioned that a Jimmy is a truck... [tongue in cheek e]

Posted By: RhubarbCommando Re: Jimmies - word origin - 08/20/02 11:38 AM
One reason why they would never be called "Jimmies" over here is that the word was a very usual piece of rhyming slang - a contraction for "Jimmy Riddle."



Posted By: belMarduk Re: Jimmies - word origin - 08/20/02 07:50 PM
Jimmy is a truck? Or sprinkles?

I always though jimmy was what you did to the window when you were trying to sneak back into the house without your Mom & Dad noticing. Jimmy = pry, chez nous.

Posted By: Faldage Re: Jimmies - word origin - 08/21/02 12:25 AM
Hey! My old pappy was known as Jimmy. Not a Glaswegian, but he *was born in Paisley, which ain't all that far from Glesga.

Posted By: rkay Re: Jimmies - word origin - 08/22/02 03:43 PM
When I was a child, we went to the Netherlands on holiday. The breakfast at the hotel was unforgettable. Among many other things there were those chocolate sprinkles on the table, to be sprinkled on the buttered bread. And we were told they are called "gestampte muisjes", which means: crushed mice.
_______________________________________________

oooh, sorry, as someone of dutch origin I have to disagree on this one - muisjes are the tiny little pink and white aniseed balls that you sprinkle on your bread. The chocolate stuff is called 'hagelslag' (not sure how to describe how to pronounce that one though!).

Back to the original topic, jimmies or jim-jams were what we called our pyjamas when we were little. Hadn't ever heard of the words referring to anything else. Are these American usages or are they found elsewhere?

Posted By: of troy Re: Jimmies - word origin - 08/22/02 03:49 PM
Jimmie
1) a G M truck (pick up/suv type truck)
3) childish name for pyjamams
3) (verb) forcing a window (or door) open
4) chocolate sprinkles for ice cream or cookies
5) generic nickname for Glaswegians
6) a bit of rude rhyming slang.
7) a common nickname for boys named James
8) ? any More?

Posted By: Faldage Re: Jimmies - word origin - 08/22/02 03:52 PM
5) ? (was there an other one?)

5) A Glaswegian.

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