Wordsmith.org: the magic of words

Wordsmith Talk

About Us | What's New | Search | Site Map | Contact Us  

Page 2 of 2 < 1 2
Topic Options
#75628 - 07/11/02 04:54 AM Re: write me call me
FishonaBike Offline
veteran

Registered: 10/11/00
Posts: 1346
Loc: Sussex, England
write a letter to me
fax the results to me


D'oh!

They get bollixed around
Here's an interesting (??) thing, MG - Brits would say "bollocksed [sic, I think] up" or (more frequently) "ballsed up". Occasionally "bollocksed/ballsed about". But I've never heard "bollocksed around". I was thinking we'd maybe say "buggered around", but it's the same story there, I think. Opinions from other Brits?

'Don't let's' - it's a contraction of 'Do not let us'
Amazing. I've used "let's" loads of times, but never thought about what the "'s" was short for. Of course I'd have guessed it was short for "us", but that just makes it even more weird.

I suspect more people would say "Let's not" than "Don't let's". Which is a contraction of a contraction, come to think of it.




Top
#75629 - 07/11/02 10:35 PM Re: don't let's
slithy toves Offline
enthusiast

Registered: 01/29/02
Posts: 320
Loc: Sarasota, Florida, US
In the old Bette Davis flick "Now Voyager," the one where Paul Henried was always lighting two cigarettes and handing one to Bette, her final line was, I believe, "Oh, don't let's ask for the moon. We've already got the stars." Everyone loved hearing her say stuff like that, even though no one in the US audience would ever say it that way. Meanwhile, she taught us kids how glamorous it could be to take huge drags on a king-size filter-tip.


Top
#75630 - 07/12/02 04:19 AM Re: don't let's
FishonaBike Offline
veteran

Registered: 10/11/00
Posts: 1346
Loc: Sussex, England
Everyone loved hearing her say stuff like that, even though no one in the US audience would ever say it that way

Yes, slithy. Maybe when Now Voyager came out people in England would actually have said "don't let's", but it sounds quite old fashioned - albeit quaintly upper-crust - these days.

The phrase has a touch of public schoolgirl about it somehow, which has (naturally) led to its occasional abuse by a certain type of older Englishwoman. Cue that wonderful phrase "Mutton dressed as lamb".




Top
Page 2 of 2 < 1 2


Moderator:  Jackie 
Forum Stats
8687 Members
16 Forums
13783 Topics
213023 Posts

Max Online: 3341 @ 12/09/11 02:15 PM
Newest Members
csmoore, Jane Luckner, anjela, MR LOGOPHILE, PlayRiter
8686 Registered Users
Who's Online
0 registered (), 32 Guests and 1 Spider online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Top Posters (30 Days)
wofahulicodoc 77
LukeJavan8 61
endymion6 56
jenny jenny 49
Tromboniator 11
Faldage 5
Mercur10 1
Jane Luckner 1
MR LOGOPHILE 1
csmoore 1
April
Su M Tu W Th F Sa
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30

Disclaimer: Wordsmith.org is not responsible for views expressed on this site. Use of this forum is at your own risk and liability - you agree to hold Wordsmith.org and its associates harmless as a condition of using it.

Home | Today's Word | Yesterday's Word | Subscribe | FAQ | Archives | Search | Feedback
Wordsmith Talk | Wordsmith Chat

© 2014 Wordsmith