Wordsmith.org: the magic of words

Wordsmith Talk

About Us | What's New | Search | Site Map | Contact Us  

Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 >
Topic Options
#7354 - 10/05/00 09:56 AM "grow" as a transitive verb
AnnaStrophic Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 03/15/00
Posts: 6511
Loc: lower upstate New York
Can anyone help me figure out why "grow crops" is just fine but "grow a business" is irksome? (or is it just me.... )


Top
#7355 - 10/05/00 12:49 PM Re: "grow" as a transitive verb
Brandon Offline
enthusiast

Registered: 03/16/00
Posts: 218
Loc: Mountain West, USA
why "grow crops" is just fine but "grow a business" is irksome?

Perhaps it is because "grow" often refers to a natural process. When you "growing a business," you are more intimately involved with the clients and the marketing. Corn doesn't need much prompting to commence photosynthesis. Of course, I say this lightly and as I eat an apple that has more chemicals on it than my computer's motherboard.




Top
#7356 - 10/05/00 01:02 PM Re: "grow" as a transitive verb
Jackie Offline

Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 03/15/00
Posts: 11609
Loc: Louisville, Kentucky
Interesting question, Anna, You certainly hear "The
business has grown" without a wince. Yet we say, "I want to expand my business". I think Brandon's right;
it's a matter of usage.


Top
#7357 - 10/05/00 02:10 PM Re: "grow" as a transitive verb
AnnaStrophic Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 03/15/00
Posts: 6511
Loc: lower upstate New York
Thanks, Brandon and Jackie. We're getting somewhere. As Jackie said, though, I have no problem with the intransitive usage, e.g. "the business/economy is growing" ... maybe it does indeed have to do with the organic element (pesticides aside).


Top
#7358 - 10/07/00 11:15 AM Re: "grow" as a transitive verb
belMarduk Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 09/28/00
Posts: 2891
In Montreal (CDA) we say 'Grow a business' all the time. We use it mostly to mean increasing the business in a particular area (eg. I want to grow the shampoo business in grocery stores). I think it may be because the French say "faire grandir un marche" (oops, do not have French keyboard at moment as I am in an internet cafe in Florida, USA, so you will have to imagine the accent on the e there) Which means to 'make an area of business grow'. I believe that is why the expression is so widely used - and accepted. To be honest, I am not sure if the rest of the country uses grow in the same way. There seems to be some important differences between Quebec English and the rest of Canada English.

Well, I have officially crossed the line into being a fanatic. I am on vacation and, just had to come in to view AWAD. We are avoiding the noon-day sun and I thought this was the perfect place. Pretty good excuse no?


Top
#7359 - 10/07/00 11:42 AM Re: "grow" as a transitive verb
RhubarbCommando Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 08/23/00
Posts: 2204
(oops, do not have French keyboard at moment as I am in an internet cafe in Florida, USA, so you will have to imagine the accent on the e there)

Bel, é is achievable, if you are using Word for Windows, by holding down ALT and typing 0233. A whole range of accents is possible using this sort of technique.


Top
#7360 - 10/07/00 12:02 PM Re: "grow" as a transitive verb
tsuwm Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 04/03/00
Posts: 10522
Loc: this too shall pass
>Bel, é is achievable, if you are using Word for Windows

actually®, he said with élan, this works equally well inside our own ineffable AWAD editor, at least with most browsers.

here's a link I provided elsewhen for a complete(?) character set:
http://www.ramsch.org/martin/uni/fmi-hp/iso8859-1.html

Top
#7361 - 10/07/00 05:19 PM Re: "grow" as a transitive verb
jmh Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 03/22/00
Posts: 1981
Meanwhile ...

before we get too obsessed by the pleasures (?!) of the qwerty keyboard, what are the important differences between Quebec English and the rest of Canada English?


Top
#7362 - 10/07/00 08:35 PM Re: "grow" as a transitive verb
AnnaStrophic Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 03/15/00
Posts: 6511
Loc: lower upstate New York
We are avoiding the noon-day sun and I thought this was the perfect place. Pretty good excuse no?

..thus proving once and for all you are neither a mad dog nor an Englishman


Top
#7363 - 10/11/00 09:44 AM Re: Québec v.s. Canada English
belMarduk Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 09/28/00
Posts: 2891
One very important difference is the adoption of French Canadian words into the English vocabulary, eg: DÉPANNEUR (pronounced Day-pan-er) is ONLY used in Québec - not in any other French speaking country - to mean a convenience store; one of those open-all-night "mom 'n pop" stores. All English speaking people in Québec use this term. It is not used, nor understood, anywhere else in Canada. A second example is the word AUTOROUTE (pronounce OH-toe-route) to mean a highway (many-laned, high-speed road). It is pretty self evident when you look at the word - a road (route) for automobiles but is not used elsewhere.

CHECK is an example of a word that should be used the same everywhere but isn't. When I am at a restaurant in Quebec and I want to pay for my food I ask for the bill (la facture) not for the check like the rest of Cda (or the USA as I found out this week-end). A check is what you pay your bills with and in Québec is spelled the French way 'cheque' in both English and French.

I usually find out I've used a 'Québecism' when I say something and I get a blank look from the person I am speaking with.


Top
Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 >

Moderator:  Jackie 
Forum Stats
8738 Members
16 Forums
13806 Topics
215134 Posts

Max Online: 3341 @ 12/09/11 02:15 PM
Newest Members
KatieC, ashishsum, ackcat, mayne, Yesurbius
8738 Registered Users
Who's Online
0 registered (), 18 Guests and 4 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Top Posters (30 Days)
endymion6 84
LukeJavan8 82
wofahulicodoc 67
A C Bowden 38
Tromboniator 4
May 4
FoFong 3
LadyReader 2
tsuwm 1
KatieC 1
Top Posters
wwh 13858
Faldage 13803
Jackie 11609
tsuwm 10522
Buffalo Shrdlu 7210
AnnaStrophic 6511
LukeJavan8 6489
Wordwind 6296
of troy 5400
BranShea 5282

Disclaimer: Wordsmith.org is not responsible for views expressed on this site. Use of this forum is at your own risk and liability - you agree to hold Wordsmith.org and its associates harmless as a condition of using it.

Home | Today's Word | Yesterday's Word | Subscribe | FAQ | Archives | Search | Feedback
Wordsmith Talk | Wordsmith Chat

© 2014 Wordsmith