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#212639 - 09/26/13 08:38 PM slip of the tongue, actually... [Re: Tromboniator]
wofahulicodoc Online   content
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 08/06/01
Posts: 4483
Loc: Worcester, MA

LAPSUS LINGUAE

PRONUNCIATION:
(LAP-suhs LING-gwee, LAHP-soos LING-gwy)

MEANING:
noun: A slip of the tongue.

ETYMOLOGY: From Latin lapsus linguae (slip of the tongue). Earliest documented use: 1668.

NOTES: Malapropisms and spoonerisms are two examples of lapsus linguae.

------------------------------

LIPSUS LINGUAE - a fancy kiss

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#212643 - 09/26/13 11:50 PM Re: slip of the tongue, actually... [Re: wofahulicodoc]
jenny jenny Online   content
veteran

Registered: 06/05/10
Posts: 1301
Loc: Lower Aberdeen, Mississippi
RAPSUS LINGUAE - Snoop Dog's explanation to the FCC as to why he rapped the word motherfucker on National TV (slip of the tongue).

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#212647 - 09/27/13 09:38 AM wordy words [Re: jenny jenny]
wofahulicodoc Online   content
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 08/06/01
Posts: 4483
Loc: Worcester, MA

PAREGMENON

PRONUNCIATION:
(puh-REG-muh-non)

MEANING: noun: The juxtaposition of words that have the same roots. Examples: sense and sensibility, a manly man, the texture of textile.

ETYMOLOGY: From Greek paregmenon, from paragein (to bring side by side). Earliest documented use: 1577.

---------------------------------------------------


PAREGGMENON --

Depending on how you parse it.
1. two guys fomenting a riot (pair-egg-men-on)
Less commonly:
2. Hey, you two guys, get off my back! (pair-egg-me-non)

----------------------------

BTW - AFK for most of the weekend.

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#212653 - 09/27/13 07:05 PM Re: wordy words [Re: wofahulicodoc]
jenny jenny Online   content
veteran

Registered: 06/05/10
Posts: 1301
Loc: Lower Aberdeen, Mississippi
PAREGMEANON noun: The juxtaposition of two mean words that have the same mean roots. Example: mean and meaner, etc.

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#212667 - 09/30/13 06:59 AM caution - grossness alert, sort of [Re: jenny jenny]
wofahulicodoc Online   content
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 08/06/01
Posts: 4483
Loc: Worcester, MA

PETARD

PRONUNCIATION:
(pe-TAHRD, pi-)

MEANING:
noun:
1. A small bomb used to blast down a gate or wall.
2. A loud firecracker.

ETYMOLOGY:
From French péter (to break wind), from Latin peditum (a breaking wind), from pedere (to break wind). Ultimately from the Indo-European root pezd- (to break wind) which also gave us feisty, fart, and French pet (fart). Earliest documented use: 1566.

NOTES:
A petard was a bell-shaped bomb used to breach a door or a wall. Now that we have advanced to ICBMs, this low-tech word survives in the phrase "to hoist by one's own petard" meaning "to have one's scheme backfire". The idiom was popularized by Shakespeare in his play Hamlet. Hamlet, having turned the tables on those tasked with killing him, says:
For 'tis the sport to have the engineer
Hoist with his own petard

--------------------------------

PETYARD = a Chinese abbatoir

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#212668 - 09/30/13 11:58 AM Re: caution - grossness alert, sort of [Re: wofahulicodoc]
LukeJavan8 Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/23/08
Posts: 6041
Loc: Land of the Flat Water
SETYARD = a sunny half acre filled with rocking chairs
for residents to 'set a spell' and reminisce.
_________________________
----please, draw me a sheep----

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#212675 - 09/30/13 09:13 PM Sometimes things too cute are gross [Re: LukeJavan8]
jenny jenny Online   content
veteran

Registered: 06/05/10
Posts: 1301
Loc: Lower Aberdeen, Mississippi
add C

PETCARD - a cardboard cutout getwell card of a cute fluffy dog who looks like your own dog when he was just a little puppy given to you as you lie on a less-than-hospitable bed in pain amongst an over-abundance of incompetent doctoring.

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#212679 - 10/01/13 10:23 AM Re: Sometimes things too cute are gross [Re: jenny jenny]
LukeJavan8 Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/23/08
Posts: 6041
Loc: Land of the Flat Water
I like your definition.
_________________________
----please, draw me a sheep----

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#212684 - 10/01/13 08:18 PM Li'l Abner in London [Re: LukeJavan8]
jenny jenny Online   content
veteran

Registered: 06/05/10
Posts: 1301
Loc: Lower Aberdeen, Mississippi
druthers

PRONUNCIATION:(DRUTH-uhrz)
MEANING:
noun: One's own way; preference.
ETYMOLOGY:
Plural of druther, contraction of ’d rather, as in "I/he/etc. would rather ..." Earliest documented use: 1895.
-----------------------------------------------------
U to A
DRATHERS - spoken/sung lyrics of Rex Harrison's opening song in the 1959 English version of the Broadway play "Li'l Abner".

If I had my drathers,
I'd drather have my drathers
Than work any wheres at all
It ain't that I hates it,
I often contemplates it
while watchin' the rain drops fall

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#212693 - 10/02/13 10:28 PM Hi ! [Re: jenny jenny]
wofahulicodoc Online   content
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 08/06/01
Posts: 4483
Loc: Worcester, MA

DUDGEON

PRONUNCIATION:
(DUHJ-uhn)

MEANING:
noun: A feeling of anger, resentment, indignation, etc.

ETYMOLOGY:
Of unknown origin. Earliest documented use: 1380.

NOTES:
This word is often used in the term "in high dudgeon" as in "He went off in high dudgeon" meaning "He left in great anger and indignation."

---------------------------------------

DRUDGEON - a worker in a dull, boring, and repetitive job

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